1897-1898 Sumner County High School, Wellington, Kansas

Title

1897-1898 Sumner County High School, Wellington, Kansas

Scroll down to view and search inside this booklet.

Subject

Sumner County, Kansas--History

Sumner County, Kansas--Schools

Wellington, Kansas--History

Wellington, Kansas--Schools

Sumner County, Kansas -- Schools -- Yearbooks

Description

This was the first annual catalogue of the Sumner County High School. It includes the dates of events during the school year, names of the faculty, board of trustees and students. Also includes the school's mission statement, and the courses offered.

Creator

Sumner County High School

Voice Printery, Wellington

Source

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Publisher

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Date

1897-1898

Relation

Sumner County Schools Collection, Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

Catalogs

Coverage

1897-1898



Citation
Sumner County High School and Voice Printery, Wellington, “1897-1898 Sumner County High School, Wellington, Kansas,” Wellington Digital Collections, accessed September 30, 2022, https://wellington.digitalsckls.info/item/21.
Text

SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
WELLINGTON.
1897 - '98.
SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOl BUILDING.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE
OF THE SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
FOR THE YEAR 1897-'98.
VOICE PRINTERY, WELLINGTON.
WELLINGTON, KANSAS. 1898.
1898.
FEBRUARY,

S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 910 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28



1 2 3
6
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30

1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 30 24 25 26 27 28 29

SEPTEMBER,
OCTOBER,
NOVEMBER,
DECEMBER,
1839,
JANUARY,
MARCH,
APRIL,
MAY,
JUNE,
S M T W T F S
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30
1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 30 24 31 25 26 27 28 29
1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30
1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31

1 2 3 4 5
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
For 1898-99.
Sept. 19, Monday—First term begins. General assembly of students in High School building at 9 a.m.
Nov. 16, 17, 18, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday—Half term examinations.
Nov. 21, Monday—Second half term begins.
Nov. 24, and 25, Thursday and Friday—Thanksgiving recess.
Dec. 23, Friday—Christmas recess begins.
Jan. 2, Monday—Christmas recess ends.
Jan. 18, Wednesday—Annual literary contest.
Jan. 25, 26, and 27, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday—Half term examinations
Jan. 27, Friday—First term closes.
Jan. 30, Monday—Second term begins.
March 29, 30, and 31, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday—Half term examinations.
April 3, Monday—Second half term begins.
May 28, Sunday, 8 p.m.—Baccalaureate sermon.
June 2, Friday, S p.m.—Commencement exercises.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
J. A. RYLAND.................................Caldwell
H. J. DONOHUE................................Portland
C. C. CURTIS.................................Wellington
CHAS. J. HUMPHREY.............. .............Wellington
E. L. CLINE .................................Conway Springs
MARCELLUS PIATT..............................Peck
J. W. McLAUGHLIN, County Superintendent .....Wellington
OFFICERS OF BOARD,
J. W. McLAUGHLIN..............President Ex-Officio
CHAS. J. HUMPHREY.............Secretary
H. J. DONOHUE.................Treasurer
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
J. W. McLAUGHLIN. MARCELLUS PIATT.
CHAS. J. HUMPHREY.
THOS. W. BUTCHER, A. B., Principal, Latin and German.
E. KELLEY,
Mathematics.
MAUDE A. PRICE,
English and Drawing.
VICTOR E. CREIGHTON, Sciences.
GEORGE C. WAKEFIELD, History and Civics.
CLARA H. SCOTT,
Vocal Music.
FLORENCE C. WILSON, Elocution.
(TO BE ELECTED,)
Assistant in Latin and English.
(TO BE ELECTED,)
Shorthand and Typewriting.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 5
MISSION OF THE COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
Through the efforts of J. H. Canfield, of the University of Kansas, now Chancellor of the University of Ohio, the legislature of 1SS6, passed a law which provides that “each county having a population of six thousand inhabitants or over, as shown by the last state or federal census, may establish a county high school on the conditions and in the manner hereinafter prescribed, for the purpose of affording better educational facilities for pupils more advanced than those attending district schools, and for persons who desire to fit themselves for the vocation of teaching.”
The county high school in Kansas is the connecting link in the public school system between the common school on the one hand, and the State University, State Normal, and State Agricultural College on the other. Without such a school the educational system of the state would be imperfect indeed. The state agrees to give every young man and woman within her borders a university training at public expense, but, in the absence of the county high school, the student graduating from the district school finds, that in order to reach the higher schools of the state, where tuition is again free, he must pay tuition four years in a preparatory school. The result of this condition in too many cases is that the graduate of the common school pursues his course no further, and the object of the public school system —a thoroughly educated citizen—is defeated. For years, educators have insisted upon a high school in the city which prepared students to enter the higher institutions of learning in the state, but not until recent years was an effort made to provide the country boy with the same educational advantages that are offered in the city; but the rights of the country boy have at last been recognized, and the township graded school in some states, and the county high school in other states, are the result.
It is sometimes urged that those graduates of the district school who desire to continue their course should pay tuition in a preparatory school and thereby relieve the county of supporting a school. In this connection there are three arguments to be made in favor of the county high school.
First, it can be shown that many ambitious students find it impossible to meet the extra expense of living away from home and at the same time pay tuition.
Again, the object of the county high school is not only to meet the demand for such a school, but also to create a demand for a higher school. That a school creates educational sentiment is shown in every community where a college or high school is located.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE.
7
HISTORY AND ORGANIZATION,
The Sumner County High School, which is operated under the general law governing county high schools in Kansas, was organized under a special act passed by the state legislature in the session of 1897.
This act empowered the board of education of the city of Wellington to lease, for a period of twenty-five years, to the board of county commissioners of Sumner county, a building to be used as a county high school building. On the 23rd day of July, 1897, a lease was executed by the terms of which Sumner county came into possession of "The Fourth ward school building in the city of Wellington, Kansas, together with the appurtenances thereunto belonging and the block of ground upon which said building is located. * * * *
Also the use of the auditorium in the Third ward building for commencement and other public exercises at such times as will not conflict with prior engagements. * * * * For the term of twenty-five years to commence on the first day of August, 1897."
Although the High School was not organized until after many of the young men and women of the county had decided to attend some other school, the enrollment on the first day, September 20, reached 208. Of this number 104 enrolled from outside Wellington school district. If the above number had constituted the total enrollment for the year, the school would have been considered a success from the standpoint of patronage. Instead, however, of stopping at this point, the enrollment rapidly increased, reaching, before the close of the year, 358, of which number the territory outside of Wellington furnished 212. In point of numbers, the Sunnier County High School ranks first among the county high schools of the state, and fifth among all high schools of the state, the Topeka, Lawrence, Kansas City, and Wichita high schools alone being larger.
Four regular teachers, Thos. W. Butcher, E. Kelley, Maude A. Price and Victor E. Creighton, together with two special teachers, Clara H. Scott and Florence Wilson, constituted the Faculty at the opening of the school year. The rapid growth of the school soon made the employment of another teacher necessary, and, in November, Geo. C. Wakefield, of the Wellington city schools, was added to the corps of instructors. Later in the year, when the Teachers’ Review Course was organized, W. M. Massey, principal of the Belle Plaine schools, was made a member of the Faculty.
The Preparatory, Junior, Middle, and Senior classes were organized at the opening of the school year, the Preparatory class numbering 202 and the Senior class numbering six.
The results of the first year’s work of the School are satisfactory indeed. The time was ripe for the establishment of such a school, and the young men and women of Sumner county are availing themselves of its opportunities.
S SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
OUTLINE 0F INSTRUCTION.
The following outline of the work offered in the various departments will give some idea of the thoroughness of the work done in the School.
Students are expected to spend approximately two hours in the preparation of each lesson assigned, and are not permitted to take work that will prevent their complying with this regulation. Recitations are heard daily in every subject except the drills in elocution, vocal music, and orthography.
MATHEMATICS
Arithmetic,—*One term. A thorough review of common and decimal fractions, compound numbers and measurements. Special stress is laid on percentage and its applications, simple interest, bank discount and exchange. The ability to perceive relations and to apply principles correctly is carefully cultivated, no drill or practice that will insure this result being omitted.
Commercial Arithmetic,—One term. The aim is to secure proficiency and rapidity in the solution of problems relating to business arithmetic, practical business forms and exercises.
Algebra.—Three terms. The work embraces the subjects usually given in first class texts through quadratic equations, proportion, progressions, and the binomial theorem. Students completing this course are well fitted to take up the higher parts of the work in our best colleges.
Geometry,—Three terms. The subject is studied with direct reference to the ability of the student to make orginal investigation. The ability to reason logically on any subject is thus developed. Special attention, therefore, is given to the demonstration of orginal theorems. Two terms given to plane, and one term to solid geometry.
HISTORY.
United States History, advanced course.—One term. The library method of study is followed in this course, the important historical subjects being intensively studied. Among those receiving attention are: Civil and Political Relations of the Discovery of America, Events Leading to English Dominancy in America, Plans of Union and Local Self Government, Causes and Results of the Revolution, The Critical Period, Rise of Political Parties, Facts Leading to Civil
*The school year is divided into two terms of eighteen weeks each.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE.
9
War, including a study of slavery and the six attempts at nullification, Secession, Classification of Campaigns, Significant Results of the War, Industrial Development, Territorial Expansion, Silver, Tariff, Civil Service Legislation, Reasons for Endurance of America, and Value of the Study of History.
Books for reference, Schouler, McMaster, Andrews, Windsor, Fisk, Ridpath and American Statesmen series.
United States History, preparatory.—One term. Taylor's Model School History is used as a text. No supplementary work is attempted in this class except biographical studies of noted men, a study of important inventions and current events.
English History.—One term. Montgomery's text is used. Much attention is given to the English Reformation and Constitutional Development, including the Revolution of 1688 and causes leading to the American Revolt. The aim is to explain American history by a study of its English origin.
General History.—Two terms. Myer's text is used. Besides the text-book work, special attention is given to the following subjects: Homeric Age, Roman Constitution and Laws, Mohammedism, Feudalism and Chivaly, Crusades, Scholasticism, Development of the Holy Roman Empire, Rise of the Papacy, Reformation, and French Revolution. The object is to present facts in their relation to the art, commerce, government and civilization of mankind and to find the political value of history.
Claire’s, Ridpath’s and other histories are furnished for reference.
Civics.—One term. Wright and Kuhn’s text has been adopted. A clear and accurate understanding of the principles on which our government is based, and the machinery of government by which these principles are carried out, is kept in mind as the objects of study.
The course includes —
(1) Brief comparison of our government with other types—
advantages and disadvantages.
(2) Powers, duties, and privileges of (a) legislative department, (b) executive, (c) judicial.
(3) Defects in the systems and proposed changes.
(4) Kansas state, county, and town government.
NATURAL SCIENCES.
Physical Geography.—One term. Tarr’s First Book of Physical Geography is used as a guide in the study of this subject. Astronomical geography and the practical topics of weather, climate and rainfall are elaborated. Numerous experiments are given. Special attention is given to climatic zones, zones of life on land and water, movements of the earth, waves, tides and ocean currents, movements of the atmosphere, etc.
JO SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
A thousand word thesis on the movements of the atmosphere is required of all students in this subject.
Botany.—One term. A thorough knowledge of structural botany and the preparation of an herbarium of fifty plants will be required. Much attention will be given to the histology of plants, to the germination of seeds and the development of plant life. A study with observations, on physiology, elements of economic botany, and a brief view of the lower plants will be required. Students will be required to spend much time in the laboratory, using the microscope for themselves.
Physics.—Two terms. Hotze’s text is completed in ten weeks and the remainder of the year is spent on Appleton’s Scientific text. The properties of matter, mechanics, electricity, light and sound are carefully investigated. Although the county has done much toward providing the School with apparatus, the student is urged to make as much of his own apparatus as possible.
In dynamics, the composition, equilibrium and resolution of forces are taken up, much attention being given to statics, hydrostatics, hydraulics and heat. Much stress is placed upon the experimental feature of this work, the student being required to perform the most important experiments for himself.
Chemistry.—One term. Much of the time will be devoted to practical laboratory work, generating gases, decomposing new substances, and investigating the laws of chemical affinity. Much time will be given to chemical elements and their compounds. The chemistry of foods and chemical reactions will be given prominence.
Astronomy.—One term. The earth, moon, sun, eclipses, planets, stars, comets, and meteors will be carefully studied. The location of stars and planets will be given much importance. The determination of latitude and longitude, the Theory of Least Squares, and the physical condition of the planets will be carefully studied. This study will be made as practical as possible.
Physiology.—One term. Hotze’s text is used for six weeks, the remainder of the term being devoted to Martin’s Human Body. Much attention will be given to the histology of bones and muscles. Digestion, lymph, lymphatic vessels, blood, the nervous system, the brain, ear and eye will all be carefully studied. In this, as well as in all other subjects, students are urged to make original investigation.
DRAWING.
Two terms. Daily lessons throughout one school year will be given in drawing. The course includes the thorough study of the type solids; the principles, of work drawings, perspective, and light and shade; the free hand drawing of models and objects, and decorative designing. Drawings representing the pupil’s actual progress and
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 11
skill are required at all stages of the work to be filed with the teacher for examination.
BOOK-KEEPING.
One term. Double entry book-keeping in all its various forms and modifications is taught by the keeping of regular sets of books. Theory and practice arc combined and the student is led by degrees to understand and appreciate the shortest methods.
Stevenson’s text is used as a guide in definitions and forms. The work includes the principles of commercial law, partnership formations and settlements, shipments and consignments, special column journal, etc. Much attention is given to checks, drafts, notes, bills of exchange, mortgages, and letters of credit.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE
English Analysis.—Two terms. The grammatical structure of the English sentence in its more complex form is studied by the analysis of such selections as Whittier’s Snow Bound, Gray’s Elegy in a Country Churchyard, Lowell’s Present Crisis, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, or Webster’s First Bunker Hill Oration. Careful attention is given to encourage the forming of habits of using correct forms of speech. All the principles of grammar are reviewed, and by studying their application in the selection of continued discourse, they become no mean fixed constituent of the requirements for further work in this department.
Composition and Rhetoric.—One Term. Eight weeks are given to the study of the power of words. Practice is afforded in the study of their derivation and history, in discriminating synonyms, and their accurate present use. A student is thus taught from the beginning to realize that the character of his diction, whether precise, ample, forceful, scholarly or inaccurate, inadequate, weak, inelegant, determines the character of the whole composition. The study of fundamental processes, covering correct grammatical forms and the clear arrangement of modifiers, follows; the higher qualities of force, emphasis, rapidity, life, and smoothness are then studied.
The organism of the sentence, that “composition in small,” is then taken up; then the careful analysis of that larger whole, the paragraph or expanded sentence, follows until the student is ready for the grouping of paragraphs to form the whole discourse. Five processes of rhetorical invention are studied in detail; description, narration, exposition, argumentation, and persuasion.
Three elements enter into the method of teaching this subject: theory, example, and practice. The theory, those rhetorical laws and methods which are our heritage from the approved usage of the best authors, is given its due presentation. Rules do not fetter genius even; and the sooner the average writer regulates his creative impulse

12 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
by rules, the sooner will the author be formed whose art is so perfect as to conceal its processes.
But a standard of excellence must be formed in the student’s mind by contact with the master productions; hence, much time is given to the study of model forms. The pupils have access to Genung’s Handbook of Rhetorical Analysis, which contains studies from such masters of style as DeQuincey, Burke, Ruskin, Hawthorne, and Macaulay.
Rhetoric is the “constructive study of literature,’’ and such is felt to be the vital relation between these two subjects that the reading of a number of masterpieces is required as a preparation for orginal work.
But theory and ideals of excellence unaccompanied by much practice never made a great writer, “Not a day without a line,’’ and that line “ten times chastened’’ is the working motto of our classes. Sufficient original work is required to be submitted to the criticism of the teacher to afford the student at least an elementary knowledge of the requirements of clear, forceful authorship.
Original productions to meet a more exacting standard are required in the two remaining years of the course: two essays by the Middle Year students must be delivered before the entire school.
Literature.—Two terms. Literature proper is taught by means of the library. While the limited time of the High School forbids a detailed study of each English or American author, yet it oilers opportunity sufficient to study one or more representative works of each great writer in such a systematic way as may prove a guide for future reading. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Browning, and Tennyson are selected for typical studies, two months being devoted to three of Shakespeare’s dramas. Hawthorne and Lemmon’s American Literature is found a very helpful guide in American literature.
The aim of this work is not to cumber the pupil’s memory with dates, incidents, and names of works; but to open up to his mind and heart that vast wealth of English literary art, to foster an appreciation and love for its strength of thought and beauty of expression, and to impart that permanent impulse for noble reading that will conduct the pupil “deeper into life.”
GENERAL READING COURSE
The Sunnier County High School endeavors to cultivate a taste for the best in literature. It believes that this is no feeble ally in the formation of noble character. The common trashy reading matter gives way before the “expulsive power” of a love for the genuine and the beautiful. Hence we have prepared a graded, systematic course in supplementary reading for each pupil who completes the course. A number of the selections are made the subject of a critical literary

FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 13
study in the class room, and the interest of their reading is thereby enhanced. The following selections have been made:
group 1.
Hiawatha. —Longfellow.
Courtship of Miles Standish.—Longfellow.
Evangeline.—Longfellow.
Trumpet and Drum.—Field.
Love Songs of Childhood.—Field.
Snow Bound.—Whittier.
Enoch Arden.—Tennyson.
The Prisoner of Chillon.—Byron.
The Vision of Sir Launfal.—Lowell.
Present Crisis.—Lowell.
Tintcrn Abbey.—Wordsworth.
GROUP II.
Daflydowndilly.—Hawthorne.
Snow Image.—Hawthorne.
Great Stone Face.—Hawthorne.
Celestial Railroad.—Hawthorne.
Legend of Sleepy Hollow.—Irving.
A Hunting the Deer.—Warner.
Dissertation on Roast Pig.—Lamb.
My Garden Acquaintance.—Lowell.
A Doctor of the Old School.—Maclaren.
Address at Gettysburg.—Lincoln.
GROUP III.
Tom Brown’s School Days.-—Hughes.
Little Women.—Alcott.
Black Beauty.—Sewell.
Uncle Tom’s Cabin.—Stowe.
Ben Hur.—Wallace.
Mill on the Floss.—Eliot.
Adam Bede.—Eliot.
Ivanhoe.—Scott.
Old Mortality.—Scott.
Old Curiosity Shop.—Dickens.
David Copperfield.—Dickens.
Nicholas Nicklcby.—Dickens.
Tale of Two Cities.—Dickens.
GROUP IV.
Being a Boy.—Warner.
Dream Life.—Mitchell.
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.—Stevenson.
Ten Times One.—Hale.
Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush.—Maclaren.
Uncle Remus: His Songs and Sayings.—Harris.
Commemoration Ode.—Lowell. "
Pilgrim’s Progress:—Bunyan.
Hero as Poet.—Carlyle.
Student’s Manual. —Todd.
14 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
GROUP V.
The New Generation.—Schell.
Social Law of Service.—Ely.
In His Steps.—Sheldon.
GROUP VI.
As You Like It.—Shakespeare.
Merchant of Venice.—Shakespeare.
Hamlet.—Shakespeare.
Essay on Burns.—Carlyle.
Ode on Concord Bridge.—Lowell.
Groups I and II, and live selections of either Group III or IV, will be required of all Preparatory and Junior classes; five additional selections from Group III or IV, and two selections from Group V will be required of all Middle Year classes; and Groups V and VI of Senior classes.
LATIN.
Beginning Latin.—Two terms. Harkness’ First Year is used as a text. Conjugations, declensions, Latin idioms and the rules of grammar are emphasized, the object being to give the student a good foundation for a Latin course.
Caesar's Gallic War.—Two terms. Harper and Tolman’s text is used. Four books completed; Latin constructions, choice of words in translation, and Roman history.
Cicero.—One term. Five orations, the four against Catiline, and the one for poet Archias. Roman history continued; etymology throughout the course.
Vergil.—One term. Aeneid, six books. Study of Latin prosody.
GERMAN.
Otis Elementary German.—One term. A thorough knowledge of the declensions of adjectives and nouns is required. Conjugation of verbs; German idioms; order of sentences; translation of German into English, and English into German.
Brandt's German Reader.—One term. Translation with study of grammar continued.
Wilhelm Tell.—One term. Careful study of the literary merits of the play, with history of Schiller’s life and time.
Undine.—One term. One or two short stories are read in addition to Undine.
PSYCHOLOGY.
One term. A good text will be made the basis of the work in this course. Texts for reference will be furnished.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 15
METHODS, LAW, AND MANAGEMENT.
One term. White’s School Management and a general survey of school law.
ELOCUTION.
One term. A careful study of the principles of good reading; constant drill in vocal and physical culture, the object being to secure good enunciation and ease in delivery. As class work in elocution is required only in the Normal Course, special attention will be given to the best methods of teaching reading.
VOCAL MUSIC.
Students in all departments are given two lessons in vocal music each week throughout the year. Chorus classes are organized.
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING.
The best system of shorthand will be taught, an experienced teacher having charge of this department. Tuition free.
16 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
COURSES OF STUDY.
COLLEGIATE COURSE.
PREPARATORY YEAR.
FIRST TERM: SECOND TERM.
Arithmetic. Algebra.
English Analysis. English Analysis.
Physical Geography. Civil Government.
Drawing. | Drawing.
JUNIOR YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Algebra. Algebra.
Latin. Latin.
Composition and Rhetoric. Rhetoric.
Physics. Physics.
MIDDLE YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Geometry. Geometry.
Latin. Latin.
German. German.
General History. General History.
SENIOR YEAR.
first term. second term.
Geometry. Arithmetic.
Latin. Latin.
German. German.
English Literature. Eng. Literature and Grammar.
NORMAL COURSE,
PREPARATORY YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Arithmetic. Algebra.
English Analysis. English Analysis.
Physical Geography. Civil Government.
Drawing. Drawing.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE 17
JUNIOR YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Algebra. Algebra.
Composition and Rhetoric. Rhetoric.
Physics. Physics.
Book-Keeping. Mental Arithmetic.
MIDDLE YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Geometry. Geometry.
General History. General History.
. U. S. History. English History.
Physiology. Elocution.
SENIOR YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Geometry. Latin or German.
Latin or German. Eng.Literature and Grammar.
English Literature. Methods and Management.
Psychology. Review of Common Branches.
GENERAL, OR BUSINESS COURSE.
PREPARATORY YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Arithmetic. Algebra.
English Analysis. English Analysis.
Physical Geography. Civil Government.
Penmanship. Commercial Arithmetic.
JUNIOR YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Algebra. Algebra.
Composition and Rhetoric. Rhetoric.
Physics. Physics.
Book-Keeping. Business Practice and Com-
mercial Law.
MIDDLE YEAR.
FIRST TERM. SECOND TERM.
Geometry. Geometry.
General History. General History.
U. S. History.” English History.
Physiology. Chemistry or Botany.
SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
SENIOR YEAR.
FIRST TERM.
Geometry.
Latin, German or Shorthand and Typewriting.
English Literature.
Astronomy.
SECOND TERM.
Latin, German or Shorthand and Typewriting.
Eng. Literature and Grammar.
Review of Common Branches.
Required in all courses: Two essays in Middle Year of one thousand words each; two orations in Senior Year; drill in orthography one year, English classics one year; work in literary society throughout entire course; vocal music, penmanship, and drills on literary work.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 19
GENERAL INFORMATION.
Admission.
Students holding a teacher’s certificate, a common school diploma, or a card showing completion of the work in the eighth grade of an accredited city school, will be admitted without examination. All other applicants will be examined in arithmetic, geography, grammar, orthography, penmanship, physiology, reading and U. S. history.
Students entering at any time will find classes suited to their needs.
Location and Building.
The Sumner County High School is situated in the center of a beautiful campus on an eminence in the northwest part of the city of Wellington. The building, which contains but six recitation rooms, having proved too small to accommodate all who desire to attend the School, additional room will be provided for the coming year.
Wellington is located almost in the geographical center of the county. Students living in the most remote parts of the county can reach their homes on Friday evening after the close of school for the week.
The healthful location of Wellington, her railroad facilities, her lecture course, her churches, and her interest in the cause of education, constitute a desirable location for a school.
Library
The library, necessarily small as yet, was selected to meet the requirements of a high school. It contains many of the best reference works in history, literature and science, as well as a large number of standard works on fiction, biography, poetry, etc.
Appreciating the importance of a library in a school, where, in the coming years, the character of the reading of thousands of young men and women may be determined for life, the Board of Trustees and the Faculty arc striving to build up a library that will be a boon to the School and a credit to Sumner county. Important additions will be made before the opening of school in September.
The High School is indebted to a number of its friends, whose names appear on another page, for donations to the library during the past year.
Expenses.
Tuition is free to all residents of the county regardless of age.
20 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
Non-residents are required to pay a fee of $2 per month. Board and furnished rooms can be secured at $2.50 per week.
Boarding clubs will be organized for the coming year which will „ we believe, reduce the price of table board to $1.50 per week.
During the past year, a large number of students rented unfurnished rooms, which they secured at 25 cents per week, and brought their furniture and provisions from home. Some of these students report that in this way they reduced the cash expense of attending school throughout the year to $25.
From an examination of the above figures it will be seen that a course in the High School is within reach of every young man and woman in the county.
Courses of Study
The law governing courses of study for county high schools is as follows:
“There shall be provided three courses of instruction, each requiring three years' study for completion, namely: A General Course, a Normal Course, and a Collegiate Course.
The General Course shall be designed for those who cannot continue school life after leaving said high school. The Normal Course shall be designed for those who intend to become teachers, and shall fully prepare those who wish to enter the Freshman class of the State University or of the State Agricultural College, or of any other institution of higher learning in the State.”
In accordance with the above law, three courses of study are offered by the Sumner County High School. These courses, as outlined on another page, meet the requirements of the law, and have been passed upon favorably by President Taylor, of the State Normal, and by Chancellor Snow, of the University of Kansas.
The General Course gives the student a thorough knowledge of the common branches, a course in penmanship, book-keeping, commercial law and business practice, a year of general history, a year and a half of science, three years of English, four years of mathematics, and a year of German, Latin, or shorthand and typewriting.
The Normal Course contains much of the work offered in the General Course, with the addition of drawing, psychology, and methods and management. Upon completion of the course, the student receives not only a diploma, but also a second grade teacher’s certificate. Graduates from this course will be given advanced standing in the State Normal.
The Collegiate Course places special emphasis upon English, mathematics, Latin and German. While this course is designed, primarily, to prepare students to enter college, it furnishes a most valuable training for teachers, and for those who do not intend to continue in school after graduation from the High School. Graduates of this course will be admitted, without examination, to the Freshman class of the University of Kansas.
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE. 21
Students who do not intend to graduate are not required to adhere to any course, but may choose subjects from any or all of them.
Business Course,
In response to a demand from all over the county, a complete business course is offered for the coming year. This course includes book-keeping, commercial law, commercial arithmetic, banking, business forms, shorthand, typewriting—everything offered in the best business colleges. As in other departments of the school, tuition is free to residents of the county.
Teachers’ Course,
A review course in the common branches is organized during the latter part of the second term to accommodate teachers who enter after the close of their schools.
Sub-Preparatory Course.
In order to accommodate students who complete the eighth grade work in city schools at the middle of the year, and those from the country who desire to enter after the close of their home school, a sub-preparatory class is organized for the second term. The subjects offered in this course arc: Arithmetic, English grammar, physiology, and United States history.
Examinations.
Written examinations are held twice each term. In addition to these examinations, written quizzes are given, without notice, at least once each month. In making up the term grade, the examination and quiz grades are averaged with the student’s daily grades. A general average of 8o per cent, is required for passing in any subject.
Report Cards.
Four times each year a record of the student’s work is sent to his parents, or guardian. Reports are made more frequently when the student’s work is not satisfactory.
Advanced Standing.
Students will be given advanced standing in the School upon presentation of grades from an accredited school, or upon examination.
Final Examinations.
Final examination on any subject will be given at any time a student may ask for it.
Literary Societies,
Three literary societies, the Cadmus, Gladstonian, and Literati
22 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
have been organized, one of which every student in the School is required to join. These societies meet on Monday afternoon and are managed by the students, one of the teachers acting as critic.
Every performance presented in the sessions of these societies is first passed upon by a member of the Faculty, after which the student is drilled by the instructor in elocution.
The Disciples of Demosthenes is a young men’s debating club which meets Thursday afternoon of each week. This club is controlled exclusively by the students, and is open to visitors on such occasions only as its members shall by vote decide, the embarrassment, which usually attends early efforts at debating and extemporaneous speaking, thus being removed.
A young women’s debating club will be organized for the coming year.
Appreciating the importance of literary work, every effort is being put forth to make this one of the strong features of the High School. In many schools literary work is made optional, but in this School it is required.
Prize Contest.
On Wednesday evening, January 18, the annual literary contest will be held. This contest is open to all students. The winners will be awarded prizes consisting of valuable books.
Paper.
High School Life is a monthly publication published by the High School and devoted to its interests.
Distribution of Patronage,
One of the most satisfactory results of the first year’s work of the High School is the fact that twenty-nine of the thirty townships in the county were represented in the school. That the school should draw patronage from all parts of the county during the first year of its existence, was not to be hoped for, and yet such was the result. The attendance, however, from the country is, we believe, only beginning. As the standard of the country schools is raised until they all meet the requirements for entrance into the High School, the attendance from the country will greatly increase.
Study Room.
Students, when not reciting, go to the assembly room. This room is in charge of the Librarian, or a member of the Faculty, and is kept quiet in order to permit students to study.
Recitation Periods.
Recitation periods are forty and forty-five minutes in length.
FIRST ANNUAL, CATALOGUE.
23
Discipline.
Realizing that discipline is an important factor in the education of every student, and that it is necessary to prevent students from abusing the generosity of their parents, and of the county, unexceptional deportment is required.
Piano Fund.
By means of entertainments the High School is raising money with which to purchase a piano. This fund has reached $150. A piano will be purchased before the opening of the coming year.
Prospective,
Two teachers will be added to the corps of last year. One of these will assist in the Latin and English departments, and the other will teach shorthand, typewriting and other subjects in the business department. More recitation rooms will be provided every effort will be made to better equip the school for the coming year.
24 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
ROLL OF STUDENTS.
SENIOR CLASS.
Amick, John Sherman, ..... Wellington
Camp, John Roland, ...... Wellington
Carter, William Henry, . . . . Mayfield
Hitchcock, Roy Wilbur, ..... Wellington
Renn, Walter B., ....... Wellington
Wolfe, Minerva May, ...... Wellington
—6
MIDDLE CLASS.
Barnett, Ruth, ....... Wellington.
Cheever, Alice, ....... Wellington
Cook, Mabel, ....... Wellington
Driver, Nettie,...........................Wellington
Forbes, Harry Bertis, . . . . . . Wellington
Fox, Noble,...............................Wellington
Henderson, Frances M.,....................Wellington
King, Ethel,..............................Wellington
Kise, Grace, ........ Wellington
Lambe, Cora, ....... Wellington
Moodie, Roy Lee, ...... Wellington
Nofsinger, Rollo,.............................Wellington
Pfeifer, Lena May,............................Wellington
Piatt, Mabel Vivian,..........................Wellington
Renick, Harry, ....... Wellington
Rhodes, Charles Harker, ..... Wellington
Shofner, Effie Pearl......................Wellington
Showalter, Meta Clare, Wellington
Ward, Merle, ....... Wellington
Wimer, Odie,..............................Wellington
JUNIOR CLASS.
Bailey, John G., . . . . . . Milan
Barlow, Nellie, ....... Wellington
Barnes, James E.,..........................Argonia
Barnett, Faraba, ....... Wellington
Barnett, Maude,............................Wellington
Bowers, Ethel C. ...... Wellington
Bowers, Eugene, ....... Wellington
Briggle, Vergil, ....... Wellington
Brummett, J. B.,...........................Mayfield
25
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE.
Bullock, Harry L., Millerton
Cobean, Harry Lester, Mayfield
Copeland, Carl, . . Wellington
Crider, Ethel, Wellington
Dey, Robert, Wellington
Downs, Edmond, Belle Plaine
Edwards, Effie, Wellington
Edwards, Emery, Wellington
Fado, Della, Wellington
Graff, Tacy, Wellington
Hackney, Will, Wellington
Haslett, Clarence, Wellington
Heasty, Russell I., Mayfield
Henry, Lizzie, Mayfield
Hibberd, Eva, Wellington
Hoge, Mamie, Wellington
Hurd, Leonard Thomas, Wellington
Jordan, Ollie, Rome
Kelley, Frank, Wellington
Kendrick, Ella R., Wellington
Neel, W. H., Mayfield
Neel, Lettie M., Mayfield
Newbold, Minnie, Wellington
Patton, Elia, Wellington
Pegram, Rephelius B., Argonia
Pile, Walter Clyde Wellington
Pugh, Claude, Wellington
Ray, Lawrence, Wellington
Scott, Vivian Bess, Wellington
Spitler, Olive, Wellington
Stewart, W. Edgar, Milan
Stipp, Georgia, Wellington
Tidwell, John E., Geuda Springs
Townsend, Annie May, Wellington
Williams, Homer V., Concord
Wise, Edith, Wellington
Abell, Minnie, Perth
Adams, Joseph Alexander, Mayfield
Adams, Rena, Perth
Andrews, Bertie L., Wellington
Armstrong, Mary L., Mayfield
Baker, Alvin W., Caldwell
Baker, Eunice Vivian, Wellington
Baker, John Edmondson, Wellington
Bartlett, Pearl, Perth
26
SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
Bartlett, Samuel Earl, .... Perth
Bartlett, Stacy Lavinia, Perth
Beheimer, Ira, ...... Portland
Beheimer, Otto, Portland
Beitel, Mary Elizabeth, .... Wellington
Bernstorf, Lydia S., Wellington
Bernstorf, Philip Harmon, .... Wellington
Bevers, Mary, Wellington
Billiter, Sarah Loutitia, .... Milan
Blewett, Addie, Wellington
Booth, Eva Madge, Conway Springs
Botkin, Arthur Leroy, Wellington
Botkin, George Oscar, Wellington
Bratches, Charles Edward, Portland
Bratches, William E., Portland
Brothers, Louie, Rome
Bullock, Julia Frances, Millerton
Bullock, Walter Laughlin, Millerton
Campbell, Mayme Alice, Carr, Bertha, Wellington Riverdale
Conner, Ada Maude, Cook, Albertha, Crider, Grace, Cromley, Edward, Czaplinski, Charles, Daratt, Fannie, Davis, Bertha, Wellington Enid, Okla. Wellington Wellington Caldwell Wellington Argonia
Davis, Edmund, Davis, Maude Lelok, Donahue, Henry Hilton, Lillivale, Okla. Wellington Cleardale
Doubleday, Henrietta, Doubleday, Sylvia, Edmondson, Maude, Fitzgerald, Edmund, Foraker, Dora, Wellington Wellington Riverdale Portland Wellington
Foraker, Nora, Ford, Groatus, Foster, Jennie, Fox, Birdie Belle, Freeman, Clara, Freeman, Lloyd, French, Pauline, Gambril, Frank Smiley, Gardner, Ida May, Wellington Drury Riverdale Rome Mayfield Mayfield Wellington Wellington Cicero
Garver, Myrtle Orissa, Gaunt, Dora, Wellington Perth
Gelino, Mildred Ella, Wellington
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE.
27
Gift, Clara Edna, Wellington
Green, Ora Lonzo, Wellington
Green, Lottie, Wellington
Griffice, Bessie, Wellington
Harbaugh, Nellie, Concord
Harper, Lora May, Hart, Ella, Argonia, Wellington
Heasty, Etta Lenora, Mayfield
Heasty, Grace, Mayfield
Heasty, William Joseph, Mayfield
Heskett, Carrie Belle, Riverdale
Hilton, Ada Jane, Mayfield
Hitchcock, Maude Stevens, Wellington
Hoge, Josie Clare, Wellington
Houston, Ella, Perth
Howe, Eva Lena, Wellington
Hufiington, Ethel, Guelph
Hughes, Mattie, Milan
Hurd, Lillian, Wellington
Jennings, Lulu, Medford, Okla.
Jewell, Dora May, Cicero
Jewell, Flora Edith, Cicero
Jewell, Sadie Ethel, Cicero
Jinks, Ida Lillian, Wellington
Johnston, James C., Ashton
Jones, Lot M., Portland
Kayser, Jesse, Milton
Keir, Maude Ellen, . . Wellington
Keist, Lois, Wellington
King, Joe Arthur, Wellington
Lane, Earl B., Milton
Lingenfelter, Rose Jane, Wellington
Logan, Roxie, Wellington
Loper, Helen Grace, Wellington
Manahan, Fred Harrison, Dalton
Maple, Amanda Lois, Portland
Marshall, Walter, Wellington
Matson, Flora Anna, Wellington
Matthews, Irena, Anson
McClintock, Paul, Peck
McCluskey, Alexander, Portland
McCluskey, William G., Portland
McCoy, Chas. E., Arkansas City
McIntyre, Jas. Arthur Garfield, Wellington Wellington
McKee, Leonard, Wellington
McLaughlin, Abner Earl, Wellington
McManis, Jennie, Wellington
28 SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
McManis, Walter Scott, McMulin, May,
Metcalf, Anna Adella, Metcalf, Grace,
Miller, Arthur,
Miller, Robert J.,
Milne, Dell, „
Milner, Arthur A., Moeser, Dollie,
Monley, Ambrose,
Monley, Mary Agnes,
Moore, Edwin L. ,
Murphy, Anna,
Nicholas, Bessie May, Nicholas, Dora Evelina, Noel, Nora Viola,
Oglebay, Keltie,
Owen, Frank Clifford, Owen, Myrtle,
Paisley, Adolphus, A., Paisley, Benj. Otis,
Paisley, Nellie, Pennypacker, Highley Clark Perkins, Guy Everett, Phillips, William,
Platt, Viola,
Plummer, Jo Alma,
Porter, John Hoke,
Potter, Elma,
Presnell, William Harlan, Purcell, Mary,
Rea, Walton,
Reeme, Fannie,
Reichard, Hattie,
Richards, Clarence,
Roberts, John W., Roberts, Marion,
Roberts, Wm. Roy,
Romig, Fred C.,
Rouse, Cora Grace, Ruggles, Anna Laura, Ruggles, Elsie Josephine
Rome
Anson
Wellington
Rome
Wellington
Caldwell Lamont, Okla. Wellington
Corbin
Argonia
Argonia
Hukle
Mayfield
Guelph
Wellington
Mayfield
Mayfield
Mayfield
South Haven
Wellington
Dalton
Wellington
"
" "
"
Riverdale
Wellington
"
"
Mayfield
Mayfield
Wellington
"
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE.
29
Schafer, Katherine, Cleardale
Schaper, Edith May, Mulvane
Schaper, Lorena Mabel, Mulvane
Schimmel, Katie M Cleardale
Seaburgh, William, Rome
Share, Arthur, Wellington
Sherman, Grace, Wellington
Showalter, Albert, Milan
Showalter, Jay, Wellington
Shull, Sherman H., Argonia
Shull, William, Mulvane
Sides, Mabel, Wellington
Sommerville, Sherman, Oxford
Spahr, Ora Lee, Wellington
Spear, Clinton C., Wellington
Spohr, John, Rome
Springgate, Arthur, Cleardale
Stevens, Claude, Wellington
Townsend, James A., Wellington
Trekell, Bertha, Riverdale
Trekell, Emery, Riverdale
Trekell, Mary, Riverdale
Tritt, Alfred, G., Wellington
Twyman, Anna B., Mayfield
Vandenburgh, Jesse, Wellington
VanHorn, Ida Pauline, Wellington
VanHorn, Alsace Lorraine, Wellington
Walker, Charles M., Wellington
Ward, Blanche E., Wellington
Ward, Lora, Geuda Springs
Watts, Allac W., Caldwell
Watts, Maude, Caldwell
Welin, Josephine, Wellington
Wengler, Bertha, Oxford
Wengler, Katie, Oxford
Wenger, Owen, Wellington
Whiteside, Grace, Portland
Whitfield, Maude, Wellington
Williams, Alvin V., Concord
Wilson, Lizzie M., Wellington
Windell, Ida, Argonia
Worden, Ruby, Wellington
Worden, Thomas Edwin, Wellington
Worth, Ethelyn Elma, Argonia
Worth, Lena,. Argonia
Young, Gertrude, Wellington
SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL.
30
SUB-PREPARATORY CLASS.
UNCLASSIFIED.
Ziegler, Ada, Wellington
Ziegler, Louise, . . . Wellington
Zimmerman, Flora, .... Wellington
Zimmerman, Tilla, .... Wellington
Zinn, Zaidee, Wellington
Brown, Pearl, Corbett, Florita, Cox, Amazette, Ebright, Maggie, Flandro, Edna, Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington
Fox, Wily, .... Green, Prudence, Wellington Wellington
Green, Stella, Grinstead, Ben, Keiger, Grace, Lambe, Armour, Lambe, Warren, Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington
Lawrence, Clara, Lester, Lettie, Lingenfelter, Clara, Wellington Wellington Wellington
Logan, Pearl, Wellington
Logan, Leroy, Wellington
McLaughlin, Fairee, Ruggles, Katie, Wellington Wellington
Tritt, Oliver, Wetmore, Earl, White, Cora, White, Fred, Wellington Wellington Wellington Wellington
Wenger, Anna, Wellington
Brower, Lloyd Dennis, Wellington
Doubleday, Gertrude, Wellington
Ebright, Alpha Mills, Wellington
Ellsworth, Ferd, Hunnewell
Ellsworth, Thadd, Hunnewell
Foraker, Wesley, Wellington
French, 0. J., Wellington
Harrelson, Major, Wellington
Herring, Ada, Wellington
Hoge, Blanche, Wellington
Horn, Daisy, Wellington
Klein, Mabel, Wellington
Lambe, William J., Wellington
Lee, Edith, Wellington
Lindley, Clifford, Wellington
FIRST ANNUAL CATALOGUE.
31
Luening, Kate, Wellington
Magill, Robert, Mayfield
Marshall, Eva, Wellington
Marshall, Maggie, Wellington
McIntyre, Mary Wellington
McLeod, May, Wellington
Milne, Lewis, Wellington
Palmer, Mary, Wellington
Pitts, William, Wellington
Pomeroy, Lulu, Wellington
Pugh, Joe, Wellington
Roberts, Thos. J., Mayfield
Smith, June, Wellington
Tegder, Blanche, Wellington
Townsend, Whitfield, Wellington
Teachers' Course Anderson, May Wellington
Boory, John, Rome
Boory, Luther, Rome
Burford, Clara, Belle Plaine
Davenport, Clara, Wellington
Earhart, Bernice, Oxford
Fultz, Flora, Wellington
Hatfield, Daisy, Belle Plaine
Houston, Charlie, Perth
Huston, Mary, Belle Plaine
Kelley, Mary, Corbin
Lindsey, Nellie, Anson
Logan, Clara, Caldwell
McKibben, Mary, Conway Springs
Miller, Belle, Milan
Miller, Mary, Milan
Morris, Blanche, Cicero
Morris, Dora, Riverdale
Nelson, Myrtle, Wellington
Newbold, Austin L Argonia
Paxton, Helen, Pennypacker, Anna, Reid, Gertie, Renick, Maggie, Belle Plaine South Haven Hunnewell Wellington
Richardson, Adalaide, Robinson, Josie, Robinson, William J., Oxford Dalton Dalton
Showalter, Bertha, Wellington
Taylor, Thomas W Wallace, Bessie, Belle Plaine Anson
Wengler, John, Oxford
SUMNER COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL-
CLASSIFICATION BY TOWNSHIPS,
32
Avon Belle Plaine Bluff Caldwell Chikaskia Creek 17 4 2 6 5 2
Dixon 7
Downs 5
Eden 2
Falls 4
Gore 3
Greene 11
Guelph 14
Harmon 9
Illinois 3
Jackson 13
London 5
Morris 4
Osborne 14
Oxford 5
Palestine, 1
Ryan 9
Seventy Six 14
South Haven 2
Springdale 1
Sumner 13
Valverde 2
Walton 4
Wellington (exclusive of
Wellington City) 24
Total 205
Oklahoma 7
Total enrollment, exclusive
of Wellington City.... 212
Wellington City 146
Total enrollment 358
DONATIONS TO LIBRARY,
VOLS.
vols.
Bailey, Geo. W 1 McLaughlin, Supt. J. W... Price, Miss Maude 1
Carson, Mrs. M. M 1 1
Folks, W. K 12 Price, Rev. Samuel 2
Hackney, Hon. E. T 1 Scott, I. I 1
Haslett, Clarence 1 Wakefield, Geo. C 1
Lambe, W. J Long, Hon. Chester I 1 50 Wellington Reading Room 40
SUMMARY OF EXPENSES—1897-98,
The following is a statement of the High School warrants issued to July 5, 1898, and includes salaries and other expenses, as shown by warrants numbered 1 to 172, inclusive:
Library account .. Freight on furniture Apparatus account Furniture account $204.16 $252.90 $116.29 $994.47
Total permanent expenditures Salary account Expense account $4286.75 $ 524.27 $1,567.82
Total running expenses $4,811.02
Total expenditures to date Received from treasurer to date $6,378.84 $5,800.00
Balance overdrawn $ 578.84
It will be noted that the total running expenses of the School for the year were $4,811.02, the balance being put into permanent improvements.
H. J. DONAHUE, Treasurer.

Original Format

Small bound booklet/pamphlet/school catalogue, 5 3/4" wide x 8 3/4" Tall, in printed cover