Kansas Veteran Magazine
Collection: Kansas History

Title

Kansas Veteran Magazine

Volume 9

November, 1928

Number 11

Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice

Directory of Kansas Soldiers Buried in France

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Subject

Kansas History--World War I Veterans

World War I History--Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice

Kansas History--Directory of Kansas Soldiers Buried in France

Description

This Kansas Veteran Magazine contains a Directory of Kansas Soldiers buried in France from the Department of Kansas Veterans of Foreign Wars. It also contains the Department Officers, a Roster of the Posts in the Department of Kansas, and Posts under the process of re-organization.

Creator

Kansas Veterans of Foreign Wars

Source

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Publisher

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Date

1928

Rights

In Copyright

Relation

Wellington History Collection, Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

Periodicals

Coverage

1928



Citation
Kansas Veterans of Foreign Wars, “Kansas Veteran Magazine,” Digital Wellington, accessed August 12, 2020, https://wellington.digitalsckls.info/item/20.
Text

SOLDIER
SAILOR
MARINE
KANSAS VETERAN
Volume 9
NOVEMBER, 1928
Number 11
TENTH ANNIVERSARY
of
THE ARMISTICE
THIS ISSUE CONTAINS
A DIRECTORY OF KANSAS SOLDIERS BURIED IN FRANCE
Department of Kansas
Veterans of Foreign Wars





Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
GAS
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A constant, automatic heating service—giving you a wide variation of night and day temperatures to select from.
A fuel that is silent, odorless and efficient.
A home in which furnace drudgeries are eliminated.
A home that is warm, clean and comfortable— always without effort.
The Gas Service Company
"A Cities Service Company"
Leon S. Pickens Commander Wichita
Jack Moran Senior Vice Commander Kansas City
L. L. Carr Junior Vice Commander Fort Dodge
H. A. Lopshire Adjutant Wichita
A. E. McAdam Quartermaster Arkansas City
Louis Rosenberg Chief of Staff Wichita
Charles C. Hicks Inspector Kansas City
C. W. Meier Judge Advocate Kansas City
John C. Newman Service Officer Wichita
C. E. Coles Chaplain Hays
F. S. Carlton Patriotic Instructor Wichita
H. V. Hilton Historian Salina
Dr. R. Claude Young Surgeon Arkansas City
F. P. Strickland, Jr. Council of Administration Kansas City
A. D. Sutton Council of Administration Kansas City
Frank Stillwell Council of Administration Kansas City
Harry Abrams Council of Administration Kansas City
W. C. Keith Council of Administration Kansas City
Oscar Schaar Aide-de-Camp to Commander Fort Dodge
William H. Clark Deputy Chief of Staff National Military Home
James F. Pickens Deputy Chief of Staff Arkansas City
Earl E. Shiffer Deputy Chief of Staff Parsons
Albert M. Ray Deputy Chief of Staff Junction City
A. S. Beam Deputy Chief of Staff Leavenworth
A. L. Macredie Deputy Chief of Staff Clearwater
Moses Kerr Chairman, Funston Memorial Com. Leavenworth
ROSTER OF POSTS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF KANSAS
Name Number Location
Heart of America 111 Kansas City
Over There 112 Wichita
Brown-Bishop 704 Parsons
Robert L. Graham 846 Pittsburg
Frank P. Adams 408 Kansas City
Beck-Young 1250 Kansas City
Col. Ed C. Little 1235 National Military Home
Spencer-Ralston 1254 Arkansas City
Henry L. Edward 1295 Leavenworth
Lt. Col. John D. Riddell 1432 Salina
Howard Burnett 1520 Fort Dodge
Earl L. Jones 1594 Junction City
Lt. Col. Arthur Ferguson 1030 Burlington
Custer 1528 Hays
POSTS UNDER PROCESS OF RE-ORGANIZATION
Blakely-Sutherland 1141 Topeka
George E. White 56 Leavenworth
Kawkins-Carter 1158 Winfield
Gen. Alfred W. Ellet 1174 El Dorado
Don Matson 881 Wellington
Elliott-Dale 1022 Coffeyville
James Gibbs 1361 Jetmore
Alfred C. Alford 852 Lawrence
Page 2
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Beautiful Cross of Malta,
Badge of the Veteran Clan— Telling your simple story,
"This is a Gold Chevron Man."
Beautiful Cross of Malta,
Telling of tented fields;
Of hike and trench and battle Where Tyrant to Freeman yields.
Beautiful Cross of Malta,
Telling of battles won In foreign lands or waters
'Gainst Spaniard, Mex. or Hun.
Beautiful Cross of Malta,
Jewel which heroes wear— Telling of valiant service On land or sea or in air.
Beautiful Cross of Malta!
Badge of the Veteran Clan—
We honor the man who wears you For he is a "Gold Chevron Man”.
WEAR IT PROUDLY, Oh, comrade mine! For its foundation was wrought in the old days of The Crusades when first it became the Insignia of Knighthood. Superimposed upon it is the Eagle Shield which witnesses the service and sacrifice you rendered under the Starry Banner of the Free. Radiating out from it are rays of living light which glinted from burnished steel when our elder comrades stormed the heights of Chapultepec and held high their victorious banners in the ancient Halls of the Montezumas. Rays that symbolize the morning sun which looked down upon Santiago’s crimsoned heights and illumined grim, gray turrets in Manila’s shot-swept bay. Rays which gleamed from flashing sword and fixed bayonet when China’s Imperial walls crumbled and our comrades stood guard in the forbidden palaces of the Manchu Kings. Gleamed, too, when the hosts of Autocracy were hurled back at Chateau Thierry and shattered forever in the depths of the Argonne Forest. Radiant rays, which have carried Hope and Justice and Opportunity to the far lands of the earth, and caressed, lovingly, the folds of the Old Flag, far-flung wherever her hero sons have earned the right to wear THE BEAUTIFUL CROSS OF MALTA.
WEAR IT REVERENTLY! for it is a sign and symbol of sacrifice in Great Causes. King and Prince and Potentate alike are powerless to bestow it, and by no decree of Congress or Parliament or President may the highest in the land presume to wear it. It is precious beyond price; for rank, nor wealth, nor station may claim it, and only he who cherishes the priceless boon of comradeship may clasp it to his breast as he consecrates himself anew at our altars.
WEAR IT LOVINGLY! for it glorifies the blouse of the humblest and adds new lustre to the coat of the mightiest. It is a sign and a symbol of service; a beckoning beacon when grief and despair shadow the human heart and the insignia of nobility when we approach most nearly the Ideal of our best aspirations as WORTHY SONS OF NOBLE SIRES.
—J. I. Billman, National Historian, V. F. W.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 3
Eugene Carver, National
Page 4
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice

.HARPUR M. TOBIN
JUDGE ADVOCATE GENERAL

E. S. BETTELHEIM JR
CHAIRMAN NAT'L LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE
WALTER I. JOYCE
DIRECTOR NAT'L AMERICANIZATION COM.
J. H. BILLMAN
NATIONAL HISTORIAN
H. R.SEELINGER
SURGEON GENERAL
CLAUDE G. BEARDSLEE
NATIONAL CHAPLAIN
JOHN MULLIGAN
CHIEF-OF-STAFF
J. E. MACFARLAND
INSPECTOR GENERAL
PAUL C. WOLMAN
JUNIOR VICE COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF

R B. HANDY JR.
QUARTERMASTER GENERAL
The Chiefs Staff for 1928 - 29 29
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 5
V. F. W. Thirty Years Old
The Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States is in its 30th year of service to those men who have fought America’s wars on foreign soils and waters.
The V. F. W. was chartered in 1899 under the name "The American Veterans of Foreign Service”. In 1913, this organization amalgamated with the “Army of the Philippines” and the name changed to “The Veterans of Foreign Wars of the
U. S.”
When John Paul Jones led his American crew in successful raids on the commerce of Old England in the American Revolution; when the men of Decatur performed their gallant feats off the Barbary coast; when the sailors of the “Constitution” astounded the world with their exploits in the War of 1812, they laid the foundation for the traditions of heroism that have characterized the American service men down to the present day. For 150 years, Americans have, in foreign lands and seas, presented an unbroken line of courage, devotion and resource unsurpassed in the annals of warfare. The activities of the men who have fought America’s foreign campaigns have had much to do with giving our country her position as the dominant nation of the age.
These men, returning from the fields of glory, brought home with them, rich memories of experiences shared on battlefields and warships, in trench and camp, in hospital and prison, that bound them together in ties of comradeship unknown to those whose lives are spent in peaceful homes.
In order to perpetuate the memories and traditions of battle service, these veterans, upon their return, formed societies, the veterans of each campaign commonly associating themselves together.
In 1898, American troops were called upon in the cause of humanity, to drive the tyrannical Spaniards from Cuba and Porto Rico; hardly had this campaign ended when soldiers from Kansas and other states were sent to suppress the insurrection in far off Luzon; then came the Boxer Uprising in China, where Americans bore a heroic part in protecting the foreigners. These campaigns carried the traditions of American heroism into far lands, and instilled into the nations of the world a wholesome respect for the defenders of Old Glory.
The returning veterans came home with the common desire to organize to perpetuate their experiences; before the close of
hostilities, organizations were begun. With the return of all the troops, however, a new thought was injected into the process of organizing. Feeling that the experiences of foreign warfare were common to men of all the various campaigns, the veterans of '98 met on September 23, 1899, at Columbus, Ohio, and laid the foundation of a society which should admit to membership any man who had served, or who might in the future serve, under Old Glory in any foreign campaign, provided he showed an honorable discharge. This society, today, is the great Order of American Knighthood, The Veterans of Foreign Wars of the U. S.—one of the foremost patriotic societies of all time.
On its rolls are the names of living veterans who served in Mexico, in 1847-8, in the Tripoli Slave Suppression of 1857, in the navy in the Civil War, in the various campaigns in Mexico and the West Indies, in the Philippines, in China, in Hayti, Santo Domingo, Nicaragua, in the World War, and in many other campaigns throughout the world.
It is a society founded on the comradeship of men who have had battle experience,—the tie that binds men closer than the tie of brotherhood. The entrance fee and annual dues are small and within the reach of the poorest veteran, but the richest in the land can not enter the society unless he can unlock its door with the key of foreign service under Old Glory in time of war.
The V. F. W. has done a huge amount of work for the relief of the distressed service man and his family. Being composed of men of all campaigns, it has not restricted its activities to service men of any particular campaign but has worked for all. In the halls of Congress, it is recognized as one of the outstanding agencies that is really working for the good of the man who has worn the American uniform regardless of whether or not he saw foreign service.
In the melting pot of this society, the enthusiasm of youth and the conservatism of age are combined into a current that flows unceasingly through American life carrying with it our ideals of patriotism, loyalty, and help for the helpless.
Many posts organized 25 to 30 years ago are still active. John Stewart Post No. 1, of Denver, organized in the fall of 1899, has the honor of being the oldest Post in the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
America’s "Old Guard"
The Veterans of
Foreign Wars
ORGANIZED 1899
An association of men who have fought America's foreign wars on land and sea
Page 6
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Department of Kansas
1916-1928
Previous to 1920, the only V. F. W. Post in Kansas was the Geo. E. White Post at Leavenworth, which was chartered January 24, 1916. On June 1, 1920, the Frank P. Adams Post No. 408, of Kansas City, was instituted. Shortly thereafter, delegates from the two posts formed a Provisional State Department.
The First Annual Encampment of the Kansas Department was held at Kansas City, April 13, 1921. Frank P. Strickland, of Kansas City, was elected Department Commander. He served in that capacity four years until his retirement in 1925. The Second Annual Encampment was held at Parsons in 1922, the third at Lawrence in 1923, the fourth at Olathe in 1924.
Leon S. Pickens Department Commander
Department Commander, Leon S. Pickens, started his V. F. W. career as a member of Robert Graham Post No. 280, Columbia, Missouri. He served as adjutant of that post one year. In 1924 he served as adjutant of Post No. 112, Wichita. He was elected Depart-Senior Vice Commander in 1926 and a few months later became Department Commander when Commander Weisboro resigned. He was elected Department Commander in 1927 and again re-elected in 1928. He is Post Historian, No. 112, and President of the Wichita Veterans’ Council. He is District Agent, Minnesota Life Insurance Company, Wichita, Kansas.
A. E. McAdam Department Quartermaster
While McAdam is a new man in the
V. F. W., he is an old hand in Veteran Organization work.
In 1925, the Fifth Annual Encampment of the Kansas Department was held at Wichita. John W. Wood, of Wichita, was elected Department Commander. During the time intervening the First State Encampment in 1921 and the Fifth State Encampment in 1925, twenty-five additional Posts had been organized in the following Kansas cities: Wichita, Kansas City, Parsons, Pittsburg, Lawrence, Pleasanton, Girard, Wellington, Newton, Coffeyville, Burlington, Topeka, Winfield, Olathe, Fort Scott, El Dorado, Oswego, Ottawa, Independence, Cherryvale, Iola. Some of these had a short span of life but the majority remained active posts.
In 1926 the Sixth Annual Department Encampment was held at Parsons. K. F. Weisbrod, of Parsons, was elected Department Commander. Post No. 1432, of Salina, was born during this year.
The Seventh Annual Encampment, in 1927, was held in Kansas City. Leon S. Pickens, of Wichita, was elected Department Commander. During this year Post 1528, of Hays, and Post 1520, of Fort Dodge, was added to the Department.
In 1928, Wichita was the site of the Eighth Annual Department Encampment. Leon S. Pickens, of Wichita, was re-elected Department Commander.
A slight period of depression hit the Department from 1925 to 1928, and a number of Posts became inactive, but beginning with the year 1928 the clouds began to roll away; inactive Posts became active and new Posts were added. During the first part of the year Post 1254, at Arkansas City, and Post 1594, at Junction City, were chartered. Several others are in prospect before the year closes. The year 1929 promises to be a banner year for the V. F. W. in the State of Kansas.
H. A. Lopshire Department Adjutant
Harold A. Lopshire, Department Adjutant, has served Post 112, Wichita, as adjutant for the past four years, recently resigning to take the work of Department Adjutant. He is Past Aide-de-Camp to the Commander-in-Chief, Past Department Chief of Staff, and is Senior Vice Commander of Post 112. He is a hard worker for the V. F. W. and has helped a great deal in building up the Department. While not engaged in V. F. W. work, he is Court Reporter, City Court, Wichita.
He was formerly a member of Francis Lowery Post 501, Denver, Colo.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 7
From Post to Post
Howard Burnett Post No. 1520, Fort Dodge, was chartered July 14, 1927, with 28 charter members. The post was named in honor of Cadet Howard Dean Burnett, who was killed by a collision of two planes while in the Air Service during the World War.
Comrade Burnett came from a long line of patriotic ancestors. His father, David Burnett, served in the 21st Kansas Volunteers during the Spanish-American war; his grandfather, Jacob Burnett, Jr., served in the 7th Indiana Infantry during the Civil War and was wounded in action; his great grandfather, Jacob Burnett, Sr., served in the War of 1812, having fought in the battle of Tippecanoe and Battle of the Thames, while his great great grandfather served under General Nathaniel Green during the Revolutionary war.
Post No. 1520 is one of the live posts of the Department. They have organized a Drum and Bugle Corps which they brought with them to the last Department Encampment to help make "Whoopee".
The Post and auxiliary are sending clothing supplies to the National V. F.
W. Home at Eaton Rapids, Michigan.
Frank P. Strickland, Jr., Council of Administration. Member of Pershing Class of Craig Post No. 8, founded Adams Post No. 408 and served four terms as Commander. Organized Department of Kansas and served four terms as Department Commander. Past Commander and Life Member of Heart of America Post No. 111. Past Member National Council of Administration, Past Member of National Legislative Committee, Past Aide to Commander-in-Chief, Past National Chief of Staff, Past Chairman, K. C. Kans.-K. C. Mo. Inter-city V. F. W. Executive Committee, etc.
------o------
Every member get a member.
Dr. C. E. Coles Department Chaplain
Dr. Coles served in the British Army during the Boer War and was in the United States service during the World War. He has been decorated by both the British and American Governments. He is Archdeacon of the Episcopal Church. He lives at Hays.
-----o-----
STATE ENCAMPMENT AT ARKANSAS CITY
If you have never attended a Department Encampment of the V. F. W. you have a new experience in store. Plan to attend the Encampment at Arkansas City next summer.
-----o-----
Brown-Bishop Post No. 704, Parsons, Kansas, was organized April 19, 1921, with 92 charter members. It was named for Carl Brown and Raymond Bishop, the first two men killed in action from Labette County during the World War. The bodies of these two comrades have been returned to America. Brown-Bishop Post has been the host to the Department Encampment on three different occasions. It has furnished two Department Commanders, the Department Adjutant for two years, and other Department officers. It has had its ups and downs, at one time having a membership of 170. According to its officers, it has just started to grow. Keep your eye on Parsons.
Earl L. Jones Post No. 1594, Junction City, is one of the new posts of the Department. This post was named in honor of Earl L. Jones, a Junction City boy, who was killed while leading his platoon in the Argonne Forest.
Earl L. Jones enlisted in Company "C", 3rd Kansas Infantry, April 20, 1917. When the Kansas National Guard entered Federal service August 5, 1917, this unit became Company "C", 139th Infantry, 35th Division. After spending the winter in training at Camp Doniphan, Oklahoma, Jones sailed with his organization for France, arriving there May 3, 1918. He took part in raids during the regiment's stay in the Vosges, and was a seasoned soldier at the time of his death in the Argonne. He is buried in the Argonne Cemetery.
Earl L. Jones came of soldier stock, his grandfather, the late T. T. Jones, of Junction City, having served during the Civil War in Company "B", 31st Ohio Infantry.
Every member get a member.
W. C. Keith, Council of Administration, Past Department Quartermaster, Past Quartermaster, Heart of America Post No. Ill, Past Grand Quartermaster, Kansas M. O. C., etc.
Frank L. Travis, Adams Post No. 408, was Colonel of the Ammunition Train, Rainbow Division. The Ammunition Train was recruited in Kansas. While serving in France, Col. Travis was elected Commissioner of Insurance for Kansas. He is now Executive Vice-President of the Federal Reserve Life Insurance Company and President of the Commonwealth Fire and Marine Insurance Company.
(Continued on Page 21)
PAge 8
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
KANSAS VETERAN
Vol. 9 OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE KANSAS DEPARTMENT, VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS No. 11
Leon S. Pickens, Editor. H. A. Lopshire, Associate Editor
J. M. Sturdyvin, Business Manager
--------------------------- 7 -------------------------—-
Editorials
A STATEMENT OF FACTS.
During the past few years there has been numerous charges and counter-charges in regard to what organization has or has not the right to sell the Poppy. It is not the purpose of this article to settle this controversy. We are simply making a statement of facts.
The first attempt by an organization and on any magnitude to use the Poppy for raising funds or in memory of departed or disabled soldiers, resulted from French efforts. Madame Guerin, an highly estimable French lady, worked with the French society organized for the protection and aid of French soldiers’ orphans. An immense number of Poppies were manufactured by the French orphans and Madame Guerin brought many millions to this country for the sale in New York City. Madame Guerin's efforts continued for a considerable length of time and when she returned to France, the Veterans of Foreign Wars purchased from her the Poppies which still remained unsold.
In 1920 the American Legion held a national Poppy sale. This sale was so decidedly a failure that at the next national convention, the Legion disavowed the Poppy and adopted the daisy. The following year they had a daisy campaign which was apparently equally unsuccessful.
After the Legion had disavowed the Poppy and officially adopted the daisy at its National Convention, the Veterans of Foreign Wars decided that in view of conditions and sentiment surrounding the Poppy, the Poppy was the most appropriate flower to be used as a memorial for raising funds for the aid of disabled soldiers and their dependents. Accordingly, the Veterans of Foreign Wars held their first Poppy drive and it was a magnificent success.
In the meanwhile the Legion strove to popularize the daisy. In the issue of May 5, 1922, the American Legion Weekly had a story regarding the daisy in which the daisy is called the Official Legion Flower. However, the daisy did not have enough significance attached to it to strike a popular chord and a short time later the Legion returned to the Poppy which by this time had been placed high in the sentiment and affection of the public, due to the efforts of the V. F. W.
It is a thing to be regretted that the Poppy, symbolizing as it does, high ideals and sacrifice, should be involved in petty quarrels and jealous misunderstandings. Far-sighted leaders in both organizations are striving to reach a solution to the situation. As the Kansas Veteran sees it, co-operation is the solution to the entire matter.
POST ATTENDANCE.
The problem of proper attendance at meetings is a bugaboo common among all fraternal and civic bodies where a member’s presence is voluntary and dependent upon his interest in the cause involved.
Nothing will make a Post Commander more discouraged than a bare corporal’s guard on hand for a regular meeting. The prospect of his voice echoing from wall to wall in an empty hall has more than once strangled the ambitions and ability of many a good Post executive.
The solution of the matter is found in one word—Interest. Impressive ritual work should always be the motto of every Post. The interest of the recruit is gained at his first meeting, when he absorbs the intent and purposes of the order at the hands of a degree team well versed in its duties. The Post Commander should know in advance the work to be done and see that it is presented and executed without needless discussion or delay.
After business matters have received the required attention, the decks are cleared for something new. Appointment of a different program committee at each meeting often gives assurance of varied entertainment at successive meetings. One night the Post listens to an address on some timely subject. Another night the committee has prepared a musical treat. Sparring bouts, wrestling matches, refreshments or various theatrical features may be introduced. Ingenious program committees will always serve to attract large numbers at Post meetings and soon a spirit of friendly competition develops between succeeding groups, each hoping to outdo its predecessor.
Herein lies the secret of success—Kill Old Man Monotony.
------o-----
POST ELECTIONS.
The time for the annual post elections is rapidly approaching. Section 3, Article VI, Rules and Regulations, states that Post Officers may be nominated at the last meeting in November, but shall be elected at a stated meeting in December. This stated meeting is the most important even in the Post of the entire year.
The Kansas Veteran is not at all interested in slates or steam rollers, but suggests that now is the time to begin considering available material in order that the best men for all the positions may be elected. Elect good officers and then get behind them and support them throughout the entire year.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 9
THE "ORPHAN” VETERAN.
Legislation already enacted in behalf of the ex-service man and proposed measures now before Congress should prove conclusively to the "Orphan" veteran the sophistry of his own indisposition to join some veteran order.
Government benefits, already secured for the well and disabled, were attained largely through the efforts of organizations like the V. F. W. Without this organized presentation of veteran problems to Congress, the lot of the veteran would indeed be a sorry one.
These facts should be impressed upon every unattached veteran in every community of the nation. He may be eligible to membership of one or more of a half dozen veteran societies that need his moral support and it is his duty to select at least one of these and give it his loyalty and assistance.
Although veterans who steer clear of all ex-service men’s societies will continue to enjoy the benefits secured in their behalf, they have no legitimate reason for staying on the outside. There are still untold numbers who should be brought into the fold and it behooves every V. F. W. Comrade to become a missionary, spreading the gospel of veterandom to the "Orphans” without, doing his utmost to hasten the day every veteran is a member of some ex-service man’s organization.

----------------------o-------------------------

VALUE OF MEMBERSHIP IN A VETERAN POST.
By Homer L. Roberts

Bureau Manager, United Press Association; Formerly Associate Editor, The Northwest Veteran
"A man, sir, should keep his friendships in constant repair.”
Thus spake Dr. Samuel Johnson, many years ago, but his words still carry great truth, none the less.
Perhaps Doc Johnson didn’t have in mind the G. A. R., the Spanish War Veterans, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the American Legion, or the Disabled American Veterans of the World War, when he uttered this bit of philosophy.
But as a piece of advice for ex-service men, it hits every one of us squarely between the eyes.
Test it upon yourself. You’re a veteran, say, of the Civil War, Spanish-American, Mexican, or World Wars. How about the men of your old outfit? Do you keep your friendships with them constantly alive?
Do you know anything about the new laws affecting ex-service men? Do you belong to a veteran organization of any kind? And how often do you drop around to visit your veteran neighbor and chat about his business, or call him on the telephone, or drop him a cordial note, now and then?
One successful veteran with whom I am acquainted, keeps a little memorandum book with the names of all his veteran friends and customers in it. He makes it a point to have some kind of personal contact with every person listed in his book, at least every six weeks.
Purchasable at such a small price of membership, the friendships you make in a veteran organization are certainly worth the money. Moreover, there is contact with men who were once your fellow-soldiers in a common cause, and of members of other similar organizations.
Make a careful check, and you’ll find that many of the worth-while activities in a community (and virtually all of these of a patriotic nature) are sponsored by service men’s organization.
Thus, if you are eligible, and are not a member, you are losing out on one of the greatest character-forming activities, and most valuable opportunities for unselfish community service that is open to you.—Sacramento Veteran.
POST PROBLEMS OF PUBLICITY
No newspaper has much space to devote to the aims, ideals and ambitions of any organized group of welfare workers, be it composed of veterans, church members, business men, farmers or laborers. It is the intent and desire of the daily press to record events of the greatest interest to the largest number of people. The editor wants news and he wants it fresh. Meet these requirements and you have solved your publicity problems. The Post that actually does something has little trouble winning this recognition. No editor can afford, nor does he desire, to ignore real news. At times he may seem prejudiced, often with good reason, but he will print the news if it makes him choke. The good newspaper man’s instinct will not permit him to do otherwise. When two organizations in the same city accomplish an equal amount of public service and one secures more publicity than the other, the blame can usually be attached to the group that suffers. In nine cases out of ten, proper contact with the editor and his staff has been neglected. Reporters and editors are human. They respond to friendliness and co-operation. Make them feel welcome in the participation of activities where news is apt to break. Be frank and withhold nothing. The average newspaper man has established a code of ethics and every confidence is observed upon request. Keep in mind that the newspaper of today has little time to deal in pretty phrases and altruistic dreams. This is an age of facts, the newspaper’s chief stock in trade.—Foreign Service.

------------o-------------

A MATTER FOR CONSIDERATION
The Grand Army of the Republic, the United Spanish War Veterans and the American Legion each receive a certain sum of money each year from the State of Kansas for the maintenance of State Headquarters. The Veterans of Foreign Wars have neither asked for or received state aid. However, with the increasing growth of our order in the State, we are contemplating asking for this aid. We believe that it is our right, inasmuch as others receive.
This matter will come up at the next session of the Legislature. It will be to the interest of every member of the V. F. W. in Kansas to get in touch with the member or members of the Legislature from your county. If we are to receive this aid, it will take the united action of each V. F. W. member in Kansas. Get behind the Department Officers and help put it across.
Patriotism should be an integral part of our every feeling at all times, for it is merely another name for those qualities of soul which make a man in peace or in war, by day or by night, think of his duty to his fellows and his duty to the nation, through which their and his loftiest aspirations must find their fitting expression.—Theodore Roosevelt.

DEDICATED
To those stalwart Americans who made the supreme sacrifice for the cause of Justice, Freedom and Democracy, the Kansas Veteran is respectfully dedicated with the unflinching pledge that we will safeguard and transmit to posterity, the noble and righteous principles for which they died.

Page 10
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
View of American military cemetery near Romagne, France.
MEUSE ARGONNE AMERICAN CEMETERY
Romagne-sous-Maufaucon (MEUSE) FRANCE List of Dead from the State of Kansas
Berry, Earl Noble, CpL, Co. D, 16th Infantry 1st Division; Grave 8, Row 15, Block E.
Davis, John O., CpL, Co. K, 16th Infantry 1st Division; Grave 21, Row 34, Block C.
Smiley, Charles, Pvt., Co. L, 18th Infantry 1st Division; Grave 18, Row 31, Block G.
Yokem, Virgil L., Pvt., Co. L, 18th Infantry 1st Division; Grave
36, Row 5, Block E.
Pilcher, Arthur, Pvt., Med. Det. 2nd Machine Gun Batt’n 1st Division; Grave 5, Row 30, Block B.
Trowbridge, Carl Boyl, 1st Lt., 1st Engineers, 1st Division, Grave 8, Row 18, Block A.
Hunter, Hale, Pvt., Co. D, 2nd Engineers, 2nd Division; Grave 35, Row 18, Block F.
Kennedy, Wm. Henry, Pvt., Co. 51st, 2nd Division, 5th Regt.
U. S. Marine Corps; Grave 7, Row 1, Block A.
Smith, Peter Sterling, Pvt., 67th Co. 2nd Division, 5th Regt.
U. S. Marine Corps; Grave 18, Row 4, Block B.
Miller, Charlie Otto, Pvt., 80th Co. 2nd Division, 6th Regt., U. S. Marine Corps; Grave 24, Row 32, Block H.
Kocher, Leo A., Pvt., Co. K, 4th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave
24, Row 1, Block C.
Pfannenstiel, Alex A., Sgt., Co. L, 7th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 3, Row 27, Block D.
Biernacki, Joseph S., CpL, Co. G, 30th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 3, Row 6, Block D.
Brouilette, John V., CpL, Co. G, 30th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 38, Row 9, Block H.
Carmel, Louis, Pvt., Co. H, 30th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 11, Row 18, Block C.
Gilson, Carl E., Pvt., Co. G, 30th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 15, Row 22, Block C.
Bevis, Glen L., Pvt., Co. H, 38th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 13, Row 3, Block H.
Hendricks, Raymond, CpL, Co. M, 38th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 2, Row 2, Block C.
Zemke, Carl A,, CpL, Co. L, 38th Infantry, 3rd Division; Grave 27, Row 5, Block E.
Terry, Paul, M. S. E., 76th Field Artillery, 3rd Division; Grave 15, Row 4, Block D.
Henry, Joe, Sgt., Co. I, 30th Infantry, 4th Division; Grave 17, Row 37, Block D.
Cole, Harold F., Mach., Co. K, 59th Infantry, 4th Division; Grave 31, Row 43, Block B.
Smith, Robert S., CpL, Bty B, 16th Field Artillery; Grave 9, Row 23, Block C.
Johnson, Carl D., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 60th Infantry,
5th Division; Grave 38, Row 12, Block H.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Lagrone, Robert E., Wag., Co. B, 13th Machine Gun Batt’n., 5th Division; Grave 2, Row 13, Block B.
Berg, Jack, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. D, 15th Machine Gunt Batt’n., 5th Division; Grave 35, Row 9, Block B.
Bale, Mike, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. D, 7th Engineers, 5th Division; Grave 25, Row 20, Block B.
Lane, Albert S., Sgt., Co. B, 7th Engineers, 5th Division; Grave 21, Row 2, Block E.
McCollum, Benjamin F., Pvt., Co. A, 103rd Infantry, 26th Division; Grave 1, Row 28, Block G.
Fawcett, David, Pvt., Co. B, 104th Infantry, 26th Division; Grave 16, Row 40, Block A.
Mathes, Floyd M., Pvt., Co. C, 109th Infantry, 28th Division; Grave 33, Row 32, Block E.
Campbell, Robert F., Pvt., Co. I, 126th Infantry, 32nd Division; Grave 22, Row 8, Block A.
Daniels, Fred, Cpl., Co. L, 128th Infantry, 32nd Division; Grave 25, Row 5, Block A.
Pierce, Frank, Pvt., Co. B, 128th Infantry, 32nd Division; Grave 15, Row 43, Block B.
Taylor, Chris. A., Cpl., Co. M, 128th Infantry, 32nd Division; Grave 2, Row 36, Block E.
Dorsey, Eli Ferrell, 1st Lt., Hq. Co. 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 20, Row 32, Block C.
Zeller, Clede R., 1st Lt., Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 2, Row 40, Block C.
Andrews, Harold R., Sgt., Co. K, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 36, Row 39, Block E.
Armstrong, Bliss, Pvt., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 36, Block C.
Arnold, Edward R., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 10, Row 6, Block C.
Ashley, Lloyd E., Pvt., Co. L, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 31, Row 32, Block F.
Asplund, Robert A., Mech., Co. A, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 9, Row 4, Block C.
Blackledge, Walter M., Sgt., Co. K, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 7, Row 35, Block H.
Blankenship, Bert M., Cpl., Co. F, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 26, Row 13, Block G.
Boyles, Arthur L., Cpl., Co. M, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 11, Row 22, Block B.
Brown, Henry F., Cpl., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 5, Row 8, Block F.
Brown, Paul R., Sgt., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 32, Row 35, Block B.
Carnes, Earl E., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. G, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 14, Row 42, Block F.
Cochran, Julian Card, Cpl., Co. G, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 26, Row 15, Block G.
Congdon, Hobson R., Pvt., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 17, Row 25, Block D.
Davies, George T., Cpl., Co. G, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 12, Row 11, Block B.
Defries, Ruel E., Cpl., Co. A, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 5, Row 1, Block A.
Demeritt, Everitt, Cpl., Co. H, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 15, Row 36, Block G.
Devlin, Otis C., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. K, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 31, Row 35, Block C.
Doll, Claude B., Pvt., Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 23, Block G.
Ferguson, Sidney F., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 16, Row 1, Block B.
Fiori, Seraphin, Cpl., Mg. Co., 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 21, Row 40, Block D.
Page 11
Gibson, Hugh H., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. M, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 1, Row 28, Block B.
Harkey, Clair C., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. G, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 33, Row 34, Block E.
Hodgson, Carroll D., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 7, Row 34, Block H.
Noehn, Isadore J., Pvt., Co. H, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 2, Row 34, Block E.
Horton, Francis A., Cpl., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 13, Row 44, Block A.
Hughes, Bert F., Pvt., Co. L, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 15, Row 41, Block C.
Hull, Clarence H., Cpl., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 15, Row 43, Block H.
Jeffords, Paul, Cpl., Co. A, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 8, Row 22, Block D.
Kimble, Herman, Cpl., Co. L, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 37, Row 38, Block H.
Kreps, Leslie V., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. M, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 13, Row 29, Block D.
Layton, Fred, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. A, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 37, Row 33, Block C.
Lieurance, Clarence J., Pvt., Co. L, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 36, Row 36, Block F.
Malherbe, Arthur L., Pvt. 1st cl., Hq. Co., 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 32, Row 37, Block E.
Malm, Andrew, Pvt., Sup. Co 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 39, Row 45, Block A.
Manning, Lauren T., Pvt., Co. M, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 20, Row 15, Block E.
McAlister, John, Pvt., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 39, Row 43, Block H.
McCracken, Jesse E., Pvt., Co. L, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 4, Row 7, Block D.
McDuffie, Norman L., Cook, Sup. Co., 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 11, Row 34, Block F.
McMahan, Ira E., Pvt., Co. D, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 18, Row 21, Block 6.
Mettler, Lee, Pvt., Co. K, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 2, Row 44, Block C.
Mitschler, Paul Henry, Cpl.; Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 6, Row 21, Block A.
Munkers, Gilmer H., Pvt., Co. A, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 33, Row T, Block A.
Munson, Charles L., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 14, Row 34, Block A.
Musser, Jo. D., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. M., 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 35, Row 44, Block B.
Norl, William B., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 8, Row 35, Block D.
Pearson, Varlaurd, Sgt., Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 10, Block B.
Phillips, Theodore, Pvt., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 18, Row 44, Block A.
Raber, Walter E., Pvt., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 26, Row 26, Block D.
Ream, Leland L., Pvt., Co. C, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 34, Row 22, Block B.
Richards, Aden R., Pvt., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 14, Block B.
Scheufler, William F., Bug., Co. G, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 22, Row 27, Block F.
Schwaub, John H., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. B, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 19, Row 19, Block G.
Shirkey, Earl F., Cpl., Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division;
Grave 27, Row 31, Block B.
Page
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Sloan, William E., Mech., Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division, Grave 23, Row 28, Block C.
Suppes, George, Pvt., Co. H, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 3, Row 34, Block E.
Swain, Roy, Pvt. 1st cl; Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 4, Row 33, Block F.
Taylor, Earle W., Sgt., Co. F, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 31, Row 35, Block B.
Taylor, Howard E., Pvt., Hq. Co., 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 28, Row 27, Block C.
Walters, Charles, Sgt., Co. D, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 18, Row 8, Block D.
Way, Floyd L., Cpl., Co. A, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 4, Row 12, Block E.
Wilder, Thomas E., CpL, Co. F, 137th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 1, Row 36, Block B.
Wynore, Percy F., Pvt., Co. I, 137th Infantry, 35th Division;
Parker, Henry W., Lt. Col, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 5, Row 1, Block F.
Campbell, Leslie J., 2nd Lt., Co. C, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 20, Row 25, Block E.
Bates, Percy J., Cpl., Co. L, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 32, Row 29, Block F.
Fellman, Alphonse J., Pvt., Co. B, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 13, Row 22, Block B.
Seichepine, Edward C., Pvt., Co. B, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 34, Row 5, Block C.
Shaw, Walter W., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. C, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 13, Row 23, Block F.
Mast, Fred, Pvt., Co. M, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 23, Row 44, Block B.
Foulk, William S., Pvt., Co. D, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 37, Row 32, Block F.
Irwin, Paul S., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. E, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 25, Row 16, Block D.
Lemmie, Fred H., Pvt., Co. B, 138th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 34, Row 37, Block E.
Alvord, Joseph O., Pvt., Co. I, 135th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 10, Row 19, Block G.
Coate, Frank D., Sgt., Co. D, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 16, Row 30, Block F.
Curran, Mark S., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 8, Row 11, Block C.
Cutler, James R., Cpl., Co. H, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 5, Row 4, Block E.
Day, Warren L., Pvt., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 4, Row 9, Block F.
Gillen, Glen C., Cpl., Co. D, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 45, Block B.
Gordon, James, Cpl., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 10, Row 4, Block C.
Hood, George W., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 16, Row 10, Block E.
Hudson, Leslie A., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. B, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 11, Row 23, Block H.
Jones, Earl L., Sgt., Co. C, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 15, Row 11, Block C.
Jordan, Harold M., Pvt., Co. H, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 21, Row 37, Block H.
Kelsey, Harry R., 1st Sgt., Co. 3, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 16, Row 23, Block B.
Lamb, Perry A., Pvt., Hq. Co., 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 16, Row 1, Block H.
Landes, Roy E., Pvt., Co. E, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 7, Row 25, Block D.
Lindsay, Nat M., Cpl., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 6, Row 2, Block A.
Love, Rama S., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 8, Row 3, Block C.
Mack, Arthur L., Pvt., Co. B, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 23, Row 6, Block D.
McMillen, Ralph E., Pvt., Co. K, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 7, Roy 34, Block A.
Monroe, Elmer L., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 20, Row 10, Block F.
Peters, Leslie L., Cpl., Co. E, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 15, Block F.
Pratt, William M., Cpl., Co. B, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 18, Row 22, Block F.
Richardson, Roy R., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 25, Block C.
Ricord, Edwin O., Mech., Co. F, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 23, Row 2, Block A.
Rosenkrantz, Ike, Pvt., Co. E, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 33, Row 36, Block A.
Shock, Anthony, Pvt., Co. H, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 34, Row 9, Block E.
Shook, Groover C., Pvt., Co. H, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 34, Row 9, Block A.
Smith, Frank, Cpl., Co. G, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 24, Row 5, Block E.
Stout, Earl H., Pvt., Co. E, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 37, Row 25, Block B.
Surprenant, Carl B., Pvt., Co. C, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 31, Row 12, Block F.
Warren, Ben C., Cpl., Co. E, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 33, Block C.
Zidek, Rafael L., Pvt., Co. B, 139th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 24, Row 14, Block D.
Bowden, James, Pvt., Co. B, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 19, Row 44, Block D.
Brown, Gordon M., Cpl., Co. K, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 35, Row 18, Block A.
Corlberg, John E., Pvt., Co. M, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 10, Row 19, Block D.
Crook, Oron B., Pvt., Co. H, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 12, Row 19, Block E.
Derby, John Francis, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. K, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 5, Row 43, Block H.
Foltz, Lester L., Cpl., Co. E, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 2, Row 1, Block E.
Fox, Charles Edward, Cpl., Co. L, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 10, Row 31, Block B.
Hoppas, Charles T., Pvt., Co. L, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 5, Row 19, Block B.
McConnell, Edward J., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. K, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 17, Row 43, Block H.
Ritter, Ray W., Cpl., Co. B, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 13, Row 17, Block G.
Bunkle, Fred E., Pvt., Co. B, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 17, Row 2, Block C.
Seymour, Edgar W., Pvt., Co. B, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 35, Row 31, Block H.
Showalter, Frank J., Pvt., Hq. Co., 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 15, Row 18, Block B.
Stephenson, Easton H., Pvt., Hq. Co., 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 32, Row 22, Block B.
Stull, Frank Marion, Pvt., Co. I, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 6, Row 43, Block H.
Vigola, George E., Pvt., Co. I, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 18, Row 43, Block H.
Watson, Edgar R., Cpl., Co. K, 140th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 17, Row 44, Block D.
Crisp, Jess, Pvt., Co. A, 129th Machine Gun Batt’n., 35th Division; Grave 26, Row 12, Block B.
Gersic, John A., Pvt. 1st cl., Bty. C, 129th Field Artillery, 35th Division; Grave 37, Row 9, Block C.
Hickman, Fred H., Pvt., Bty. B, 129th Field Artillery, 35th Division; Grave 7, Row 8, Block E.
Wilson, Elsworth W., Pvt., Bty. F, 129th Field Artillery, 35th Division; Grave 35, Row 2, Block E.
Beecher, Thomas I., Cpl., Hq. Co., 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 28, Block D.
Fuller, Benjamin A., Cpl., Bty. C, 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division; Grave 26, Row 14, Block C.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice 13
Suresnes American Cemetery (FRANCE)
Johnson, William B., Cook, Bty. C, 130th Field Artillery, 35th Division; Grave 4, Row 31, Block F.
Adanson, Paul D., Muse. 3/c, Hq. Co., 110th Engineers, 35th Division; Grave 3, Row 19, Block G.
Baker, Alfred G., Sgt. 1st cl., Co. A, 110th Engineers, 35th Division; Grave 16, Row 43, Block D.
Jessop, Charles T., Pvt., Co. A, 110th Engineers, 35th Division; Grave 29, Row 21, Block D.
Norris, Fred F., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. A, 110th Engineers, 35th Division; Grave 37, Row 1, Block D.
Thurman, Harold D., Pvt., Co. A, 110th Engineers, 35th Division; Grave 33, Row 42, Block A.
Vigor, John E., Cpl., Co. F, 110th Engineers, 35th Division; Grave 17, Row 5, Block C.
Jones, Raymond H., Cpl., Co. B, 110th Field Signal Batt’n., 35th Division.
Bennett, Webster S., Wag., Hq. Det., 110th Train Hq., 35th Division; Grave 26, Row 39, Block C.
Davis, William A., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. D, 117th Ammunition Train, 42nd Division; Grave 9, Row 3, Block A.
Hageman, Harry D., Cpl., Co. F, 145th Infantry, 35th Division; Grave 40, Row 10, Block A.
Priest, Wade H., 2nd Lt., Co. A, 135th Machine Gun Batt'n., 37th Division; Grave 29, Row 33, Block A.
Gill, Glenn E., 2nd Lt., Co. C, 307th Infantry, 77th Division;
Grave 11, Row 8, Block D.
McVey, Willie W., Pvt., Co. D, 308th Infantry, 77th Division; Grave 24, Row 28, Block D.
Leonard, Jerome M., 1st Lt., San. Trn. Field Hosp., 302nd Sanitary Train, 77th Division; Grave 26, Row 12, Block A.
Hall, Henry J., Pvt., Co. L, 321st Infantry, 81st Division; Grave 31, Row 36, Block C.
Ritter, Floyd W., Cpl., Co. D, 325th Infantry, 82nd Division; Grave 37, Row 28, Block H.
Martin, Clifford, Pvt., Co. K, 327th Infantry, 82nd Division; Grave 25, Row 29, Block C.
Limper, Henry H. A., Pvt., Co. F, 349th Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 14, Row 36, Block D.
Voltz, Clyde, Pvt., Co. I, 349th Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 18, Row 45, Block D.
Wright, Gracen I.,Pvt., Co. G, 349th Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 24, Row 25, Block G.
Schaplowsky, John G., Pvt., Co. G, 250th Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 4, Row 3, Block F.
Anderson, Edwin M., Pvt., Co. G, 351st Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 35, Row 45, Block A.
Barton, Ray, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. C, 351st Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 13, Row 22, Block H.
Chandler, Joushay S., Pvt., Co. M, 351st Infantry, 88th Division; Grave R, Row 25, Block G.
Johnson, Thomas, Pvt., Co. K, 351st Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 38, Row 22, Block E.
McGriff, James E., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. F, 351st Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 16, Row 44, Block A.
Buchanan, Willis, Pvt., Co. I, 352nd Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 33, Row 26, Block E.
May, James A., Pvt., Co. G, 352nd Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 11, Row 25, Block G.
Nesbitt, Randolph J., Pvt., Co. H, 352nd Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 12, Row 24, Block G.
Perry, Leo J., Pvt., Co. 3, 352nd Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 6, Row 26, Block C.
Varner, John M., Pvt., Supp. Co., 352nd Infantry, 88th Division, Grave 40, Row 45, Block D.
Walker, Glenn E., Pvt., Co. C, 337th Machine Gun Batt’n., 88th Division; Grave 27, Row 26, Block E.
Oberg, Albert W., Cpl., Trench Mortar Battery, 88th Division; Grave 17, Row 22, Block E.
Eilts, Martin G., Pvt., Co. C, 313th Engineers, 88th Division; Grave 39, Row 45, Block D.
Gjonovich, George, Pvt., Co. D, 313th Engineers, 88th Division; Grave 3, Row 24, Block G.
Wagner, Fred G., Pvt., Co. B, Supply Train, 88th Division; Grave 16, Row 16, Block H.
Cunningham, Floyd E., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. D, Ammunition Train, 88th Division; Grave 40, Row 44, Block A.
Morris, Jesse E., Pvt., Co. G, Ammunition Train, 88th Division, Grave 17, Row 16, Block D.
Pratt, Charles W., Pvt., Co. F, Ammunition Train, 88th Division; Grave 9, Row 24, Block G.
Scharpf, Ralph D., Pvt., Co. E, Ammunition Train, 88th Division; Grave 13, Row 24, Block G.
Lewis, Gilbert M., 1st Lt., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 12, Row 2, Block F.
Allen, Forrest, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. L, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 24, Row 20, Block F.
Angeli, Henry, Pvt., Co. A, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 32, Row 7, Block F.
Bayly, Harry E., Sgt., Hq. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 14, Row 41, Block B.
Beach, Alfred T., Cpl., Co. E, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division;
Grave 39, Row 43, Block H.
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Beaman, Roy, Pvt., Co. E, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 26, Row 43, Block H.
Berquist, Arthur C., Cpl., Mg. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 38, Row 30, Block G.
Blair, Tracy S., Cpl., Co. E, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 9, Row 22, Block D.
Block, Pvt., Co. N, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division, Grave 27, Row 24, Block F.
Boumer, Albert E.; Pvt., Co. H, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 8, Row 26, Block B.
Buckworth, Earl, Pvt., Co. K, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 21, Row 37, Block A.
Burghardt, Edward L., Pvt., Co. H, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 26, Row 6, Block H.
Chamberlain, James W., Cpl., Co. M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 9, Row 2, Block H.
Craig, Oscar Eugene, Pvt., Co. I, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 30, Row 15, Block F.
Davidson, Frank Jefferson, Pvt. 1st cl., Mg. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 6, Row 5, Block H.
Devine, Daniel P., Sgt., Co. B, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 20, Row 9, Block D.
Erickson, Albin, Pvt., Co. F, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 10, Row 29, Block G.
Edickson, Albin, Pvt., Co. F, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 34, Row 13, Block F.
Gray, Harry E., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 25, Row 22, Block F.
Griffith, Elmer C., Pvt., Co. B, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 7, Row 24, Block B.
Hansen, Arvid L., Cpl., Co. M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 26, Row 38, Block F.
Heald, Arlington A., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. G, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 17, Row 14, Block F.
Heidle, William T., Pvt., Co. C, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 11, Row 1, Block C.
Hohberg, Albert, Cpl., Co. D, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division;
Grave 25, Row 19, Block H.
Johnson, Harold M., Pvt., Co. I, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 4, Row 28, Block E.
Kingsbury, Larue S., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. C, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division;Grave 24, Row 40, Block B.
Hirschbaum, John, Pvt., Co. A, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 12, Row 25, Block G.
Kren, Walter R., Pvt., Co. I, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 21, Row 31, Block B.
Lindstrom, Walter R., Pvt., Mg. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 26, Row 22, Block H.
Lockwood, Emery C., Pvt., Co. M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 3, Row 8, Block A.
London, Marcus L., Pvt., Hq. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division;Grave 12, Row 44, Block D.
Marshall, Earl C., Pvt., Hq. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 17, Row 1, Block D.
McGarren, Andrew J., Pvt., Co. G, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 17, Row 15, Block E.
McDaniel, Lee B., Sgt., Co. A, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 1, Row 44, Block D.
Metzker, William H., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. L, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 28, Row 38, Block F.
Mooney, Fred W., Pvt., Co. A, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 15, Row 33, Block H.
Murphy, Joseph M., Cpl., Co. G, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 7, Row 18, Block G.
Owen, Henry H., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. D, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 5, Row 43, Block D.
Perkins, Oscar T., Pvt., Co. M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 21, Row 26, Block H.
Puetz, Frank J., Pvt., Supply Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 31, Row 4, Block D.
Schwandt, Carl Fred, Pvt., Co. H, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division, Grave 16, Row 31, Block H.
Seymour, Quincy R., Pvt., Co. F, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 35, Row 12, Block G.
Shannon, Edward, Sgt., Mg. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 36, Row 33, Block C.
Shummin. Thomas Arthur, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 5, Row 36, Block A.
Slomski, Martin, Pvt., Hq. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 2, Row 34, Block G.
Swart, Irvin Maxwell, Pvt., Mg. Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 22, Row 24, Block A.
Thompson, John Irwin, Pvt., Hq Co., 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 26, Row 19, Block H.
Trapp, Peter C., Cpl., Co. M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 40, Row 39, Block F.
Tuttle, Lewis F., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. H. 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 18, Row 8, Block D.
Verhoeff, Leonard C., Cpl., Co. M, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 16, Row 34, Block F.
Wehry, William Andrew, Pvt., Co. A, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 25, Row 12, Block C.
Welinitz, Frank, Cpl., Co. C, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 28, Row 3, Block D.
Wood, Jasper, E., Pvt., Co. E, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 37, Row 38, Block F.
Wright, Roy E., Mess Sgt., Co. G, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 26, Row 4, Block D.
Wright, William E., Pvt. 1/c, Co. H, 353rd Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 33, Row 3, Block D.
Fisher, Frank J., 2nd Lt., Co. B, 355th Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 22, Row 45, Block A.
Vilott, Fletcher L., Pvt., Co. G, 355th Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 13, Row 28, Block G.
Coonbod, John V., Cpl., Co. B. 356th Infantry, 88th Division; Grave 24, Row 27, Block F.
Gano, Harley P., Pvt., Ha. Co., 356th Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 6, Row 46, Block D.
Wood, Everett Dale, Pvt., Co. C, 356th Infantry, 89th Division; Grave 36, Row 21, Block G.
Pickering, Henry W., Pvt., Co. B, 314th Engineers, 89th Division; Grave 8, Row 19, Block B.
Murphy, Robert C., 1st Lt., Hq. Co, 357th Infantry, 90th Division; Grave 16, Row 7, Block B.
Hardpole, Tillman H., 1st Lt., 372nd Infantry, 93rd Division; Grave 3, Row 41, Block B.
Brodie, Clarence A., 1st Lt., 13th Aero Sqdn., Grave 20, Row 35, Block B.
Bleckley, Edwin Russell, 2nd Lt., 50th Aero Sqdn.; Grave 53, Row 25, Block F.
Scott, Leonard L., Sgt., 800 Aero Sqdn., Grave 32, Row 42, Block H.
Leupold, Albert K., Pvt., 3 Bn. 22 Engrs.; Grave 24, Row 35, Block C.
Hodler, Charles R., Pvt., 319 Fld. Rem. Sqdn.; Grave 27, Row 15, Block F.
Shoemaker, Floyd, Pvt., 321 Fld. Rem. Sqdn.; Grave 3, Row 7, Block B.
Osen, Eric G., Sec., Y. M. C. A.; Grave 30, Row 1, Block F.
Worford, W. Benj., Co. B, 109th Inf., 28th Division.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
OISE AISNE AMERICAN CEMETERY
Seringes et Nesles (AISNE) FRANCE
List of Dead from the State of Kansas
16th Infantry
Andrews, Albert, Sup. Sgt., Co. I; Grave 9, Row 42, Block A. Giles, George R., Pvt. 1st cl., Mg. Co.; Grave 14, Row 9, Block C.
18th Infantry
Adams, William TV Sgt., Co. D; Grave 28, Row 23, Block C. 5th Regiment, U. S. Marines
Cobeldick, John Henry, Sgt., 8th Co; Grave 10, Row 9, Block C. 6th Regiment, U. S. Marines
Axline, Ralph Cartan, Pvt., 8th Co.; Grave 29, Row 22, Block C.
Gleason, John William, Jr. Pvt., 96th Co.; Grave 9, Row 23, Block C.
4th Infantry
Ogier, Clifton E., Pvt., Co. H; Grave 37, Row 11, Block C. 7th Infantry
Doerfer, Frank B., Pvt., Co. C; Grave 22, Row 19, Block B.
Maxwell, Charley, Pvt., Co. B; Grave 15, Row 24, Block A.
30th Infantry
Deines, David, Cook, Co. H; Grave 48, Row 23, Block B.
Luttjohann, John, Pvt., Co. H, Grave 26, Row
Miller, Chas. H., Pvt., Hdqrs. Co.; Grave 25, Row 19, Block B. Park, Charles E., Pvt., Co. G; Grave 46, Row 19, Block A. Stauffer, James Leroy, Cpl., Co. H; Grave 35, Row 23, Block A. Vodraska, Anton J., Pvt., Co. H; Grave 36, Row 24, Block A. 38th Infantry
Schauer, Lawrence J., Pvt. 1/c., Hq. Co.; Grave 25, Row 11, Block D.
10th Field Artillery
Travis, John M., Pvt., Bty. D; Grave 4, Row 20, Block B.
18th Field Artillery
Mitchell, Roland A., Pvt., Bty. F, Grave 21, Row 16, Block B. 102nd Infantry, 26th Division
Durham, Oliver F., Pvt., Co. D; Grave 21, Row 21, Block A.
109th Infantry
Schwinn, Thomas, 2nd Lt., Co. M; Grave 5, Row 25, Block C. 111th Infantry
Busch, Ralph S., 1st Lt., Co. E; Grave 15, Row 7, Block D. Field Artillery
Beaton, Lloyd O., 2nd Lt., Hq. Co., 119 F. A.; Grave 8, Row 25, Block D.
166th Infantry
McMinimy, Joseph L., 2nd Lt., Co. E, Grave 7, Row 2, Block B. Miscellaneous
Gotschall, Howard, Wagoner, Co. C, 117th Ammunition Train; Grave 33, Row 3, Block A.
Scott, Charley E., Wagoner, Co. C, 117 Ammunition Train; Grave 31, Row 3, Block A.

FLANDERS FIELD AMERICAN CEMETERY
WAEREGHEM, BELGIUM
List of Dead from the State of Kansas
Medical Reserve Corps
Anderson, Lionel A., 1st Lt., M. R. C., Attd. No. 48 Cas. Clearing Station; Grave 2, Row Block D.
SOMME AMERICAN CEMETERY
BONY (AISNE) FRANCE List of Dead from the State of Kansas
18th Infantry
Sutherlin, Richard H., Pvt., Hq. Co., 1st Division; Grave 2, Row 12, Block C.
Tate, Albert L., Cpl., Co. F; Grave 15, Row 18, Block C.
Field Artillery
Campbell, Chick M., Wag., Sup. Co. T. F. A.; Grave 1, Row
10, Block C.
107th Infantry, 27th Division
Norrell, Henry W., Pvt., Co. I; Grave 20, Row 6, Block B. 108th Infantry, 27th Division
Johnson, Clarence E., Pvt., Mg Co., Grave 8, Row 4, Block B. 1st Brigade Machine Gun Bn.
Russel, Lloyd B., Captain, Co. A; Grave 10, Block C, Row 4. 88th Division
Sandhagen, George W., Pvt. 1/c., Co. B, 338 M. G. Bn.; Grave
11, Row 28, Block B.
89th Division
Delzeit, Edward N. Pvt., Co. D, 353rd Inf.; Grave 6, Row
12, Block C.
Taylor, George Daniel, Pvt., Co. L, 355th Inf.; Grave 21, Row
27, Block B.
McCormick, William Ike, Pvt., Bty. A, 342 F. A.; Grave 12, Row 37, Block B.
Pioneer Infantry
Johnson, Homer M., Pvt., Hq. Co., 803 P. I.; Grave 4, Row 32, Block 4.
Ely, Henry, Cook, Co. M, 806 P. I.; Grave 27, Row, 17, Block C Quartermaster Corps
Linger, Joseph A., Pvt., 302 Refrigerating Co.; Grave 8, Row 20, Block D.
Field Remount Squadron QMC
Brueggeman, Herman F., Pvt., 320 F. R. Sqn.; Grave 22, Row 20, Block C.
Rush, Harry F., Sgt., 320 F. R. S., Grave 28, Row 22, Block D.
Edwards, Horace O., Pvt., 305 F. R. S.; Grave 11, Row 11, Block C.
Transportation Corps
Moore, Robert J., Pvt. 1/c., 59th Co.; Grave 27, Row 2, Block C
Nowers, Paul, 2nd Lt., Hq. Trans. Corps; Grave 34, Row 26, Block C.
Base Hospital
Bryant, James R., Cook, B. H. 32; Grave 2, Row 38, Block A. Base Hospital Medical Dept.
Williams, Earl H., Pvt., B. II. 88; Grave 29, Row 24, Block D.
Replacement Drafts Medical Dept.
Charlton, John W., Sgt. 1st cl., Unit 18; Grave 24, Row 18, Block B.
Prellwitz, Herman, Pvt., Unit 47; Grave 29, Row 31, Block D. Replacement Regiments
Dorsey, Joseph W., Pvt., Co. 18, Cp. McArthur Sard.; Grave 32, Row 17, Block C.
Reeh, Joseph M., Pvt., 22 Co., Cp. Pike Sard.; Grave 24, Row
28, Block A.
Willard, Cleveland, Pvt., 4 Prov. Co. Cp. Funston A. R. D.; Grave 8, Row 7, Block B.
Signal Corps
Shue, Herschel L., Pvt., Co. D, 410 Tel. Bn.; Grave 1, Row 16, Block D.
Page 16
AISNE MARNE AMERICAN CEMETERY
BELLEAU (AISNE) FRANCE List of Dead from the State of Kansas
18th Infantry
Kelley, Sidney, Cpl., Co. I; Grave 54, Row 7, Block B.
9th Infantry
Reil, Joseph, Pvt., Co. I; Grave 13, Row 3, Block B.
23rd Infantry
Johnson, Julius, Muse. 3/c., Hq. Co.; Grave 33, Row 1, Block B. 2nd Engineers
Hopp, George A., Sgt. 1/c., Co. D; Grave 31, Row 2, Block A.
5th Regiment U. S. Marine Corps
Ames, Bert Evert, Cpl., 47th Co.; Grave 33, Row 3, Block B.
Dumars, William Wilbur, Pvt., 17th Co., Grave 19, Row 11, Block A.
Wood, Howard Bailey, Cpl., 16th Co., Grave 46, Row 10, Block A.
6th Regiment U. S. Marine Corps
Storey, Adel Moore, Cpl., 83rd Co., Grave 68, Row 9, Block B.
7th Infantry
Brunkow, Ernest E., Pvt., Co. A; Grave 83, Row 2, Block A.
Dooley, Roy H., Pvt. 1/c., Co. C; Grave 35, Row 12, Block A.
Dunham, James A., Pvt., Co. A; Grave 52, Row 11, Block A.
Nicholas, Samuel H., Pvt., Co. B; Grave 52, Row 3, Block A.
7th Infantry
Patterson, Charles E., Pvt. 1/c., Co. A; Grave 70, Row 10, Block A.
30th Infantry
Banta, Loren D., Cpl., Co. G; Grave 51, Row 10, Block A.
Meyer, John Gebhardt, Pvt., Co. M, Grave 25, Row 11 Block A.
38th Infantry
White John B., 1st Lt., Co. A; Grave 17, Row 10, Block A. 18th Field Artillery
Becker, Clarence H., Pvt., Bty. B; Grave 18, Row 2, Block B. 4th Engineers
Coleman Lowell F., Cpl., Co. A; Grave 23, Row 11, Block A. 103rd Infantry
Schisler, John, Pvt., Co. E; Grave 21, Row 12, Block B.
150th Machine Gun Battalion
Wlrod, Jesse L., Pvt. 1/c., Co. A; Grave 14, Row 7, Block A.
88th Division, 337th Field Artillery
Eckler, Robert, Pvt., Bty. E; Grave 4, Row 8, Block B.
Olson, Theodore H., Pvt., Sup. Co.; Grave 27, Row 6, Block B.
339th Field Artillery
Moliners, Victor N., Wag., Bty. D; Grave 4, Row 10, Block B. Smith, Glenn Irvin, Cpl., Bty. C; Grave 26, Row 5, Block B.
313th Ammunition Train
Geisinger, George C., Pvt., Co. D; Grave 30, Row 7, Block B.
SURESNES AMERICAN CEMETERY
SURESNES (SEINE) FRANCE
List of Dead from the State of Kansas
32nd Division
Cooper, Albert C., Pvt., Co. G, 127th Inf.; Grave 3, Row 8, Block B.
84th Division
Beard, Ralph R., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. C, 309th Field Sig. Bn.;Grave 2, Row 7, Block A.
88th Division
Beam, August, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. A, 313th Amn. Train; Grave 20, Row 5, Block B.
Young, Lawrence E., Pvt., Co. B, 313th Amn. Train; Grave 26, Row 2, Block C.
Rabideau, Henry M., Pvt., Bty. E, 338th Field Art.; Grave 23, Row 14, Block A.
89th Division
Stevenson, Wilbur A., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. B, 353rd Inf.; Grave 19, Row 14, Block A.
Nester, Albert C., Pvt., Co. F, 355th Inf.; Grave 28, Row 9, Block B.
90th Division
Atkinson, Clarence, Pvt., Co. G, 357th Inf., Grave 19, Row 17, Block A.
Engineers
Castle, John R., Sgt., Hq. Det., 31st Engrs.; Grave 14, Row 4, Block C.
Chandler, Sherman Francis, Pvt., Co. F, 32nd Engrs.; Grave 17, Row 6, Block A.
Signal Corps
Hale, Cas C., Sgt. 1st cl., 35th Serv. Co. SC.; Grave 1, Row 14, Block B.
Quartermaster Corps
Newton, Bert L., Cpl., 388th Bakery Co.; Grave 14, Row 1, Block A.
Herman, John Oliver, Pvt., Co. F, 319th Fld. Rem. Sq.; Grave 20, Row 14, Block A.
Knox, Arthur Roy, Pvt., 319th Fld. Rem. Sq.; Grave 31, Row, 2, Block B.
Smith, Leroy, Cpl., 322nd Fld. Re. Sq.; Grave 28, Row 6, Block A.
SAINT-MIHIEL AMERICAN CEMETERY
THIAUCOURT (MEURTHE-ET-MOSELLE) FRANCE List of Dead from the State of Kansas
26th Infantry, 1st Division
Mitchell, Edward, Cpl., Co. 1; Grave 24, Row 13, Block B.
Radloff, Arthur H., Pvt., Co. F; Grave 36, Row 28, Block A.
28th Infantry, 1st Division
Elstun, Eugene W., Pvt., Co. M; Grave 26, Row 13, Block C.
6th Field Artillery
Newler, Claud A., Pvt., Bty. F, Grave 20, Row 5, Block B.
Miscellaneous
Jacki, Benjamin, Saddler, Hq. Troop, 1st Division; Grave 7, Row 13, Block A.
23rd Infantry, 2nd Division
Ellenberger, William, Sgt., M. G. Co.; Grave 23, Row 1, Block D.
2nd Engineers
Kearns, Thomas W., Pvt. 1/c., Co. D; Grave 13, Row 9, Block B.
15th Field Artillery
Baker, Ralph V., Farrier, Bty. C; Grave 5, Row 11, Block D.
7th Infantry, 3rd Division
Madden, Harry, Cpl., Hq. Co.; Grave 7, Row 2, Block C.
64th Infantry, 7th Division
James, Charles F., Pvt., Co. C; Grave 20, Row 17, Block A.
103rd Infantry, 26th Division
Gustafson, Richard C., Pvt., Co. H; Grave 19, Row 29, Block C.
109th Infantry, 28th Division
Branch, Ralph A., 2nd Lt., Co. M; Grave 18, Row 13, Block A.
113th Infantry, 29th Division
Cowgill, Glen J., Cpl., Co. B; Grave 27, Row 18, Block C.
112th Machine Gun Batt’n, 29th Division
Fleming, Harry, Cpl., Co. E; Grave 9, Row 7, Block A.
137th Infantry, 35th Division
Creek, William P, Sgt., Hq. Co.; Grave 34, Row 8, Block A.
Kinward, Arthur Richard, Pvt. 1st cl., Co. K, Grave 10, Row 13, Block C.
139th Infantry, 35th Division
Ceas, Lester W., Pvt., Co. C; Grave 17, Row 7, Block C.
Snell, Clyde R., Pvt., Co. C; Grave 36, Row 10, Block C.
60th Field Artillery Brig., 35th Division Brewer, John H., Pvt., Hq. Det.; Grave 35, Row 23, Block D.
130th Field Artillery, 35th Division Oliver, Ralph I., Pvt. 1st cl., Bty. B; Grave 23, Row 9, Block B.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page
308th Infantry, 17th Division
Ducret, Jean L., Pvt., Co. D; Grave 30, Row 25, Block B.
313th Ammunition Train, 87th Division
Gates, Chester A., Pvt., Co. A; Grave 12, Row 9, Block C.
353rd Infantry, 89th Division
Aleksiehes, Toni, Pvt., Co. F; Grave 29, Row 7, Block A.
Andrews, Ivan Earl, Pvt., Co. A; Grave 28, Row 3, Block D.
Bartell, Elmer E., Sgt., Co. E; Grave 32, Row 6, Block C.
Bennett, Vernon R., Pvt., Co. A; Grave 18, Row 26, Block D.
Bosseck, Lorane, Pvt., Co. M; Grave 15, Row 5, Block D.
Bougher, George A., Pvt., Co. A; Grave 21, Row 14, Block B.
Brogden, Joseph D., Cpl., Co. B; Grave 14, Row 3, Block B.
Clendening, Foster J., Pvt., Co. B; Grave 25, Row 13, Block B.
Defrees, Albert O., Cpl., Co. C; Grave 15, Row 7, Block B.
Eckhart, John F., Pvt., Co. K; Grave 26, Row 28, Block C.
Fiorinzi, Frank, Pvt., Co. A; Grave 20, Row 21, Block A.
Grant, Zachary A., Pvt., Co. K; Grave 23, Row 3, Block B.
Hamil, Lester D., Sgt., Co. B; Grave 29, Row 2, Block C.
Heim, Aloysius, Pvt., Co. G; Grave 4, Row 22, Block D.
Henrich, Samuel C., Pvt., Co. E; Grave 20, Row 6, Block C.
Kelsey, Floyd J., Pvt., Co. C; Grave 25, Row 25, Block B.
Lands, Leo, Cpl., Co. F; Grave 23, Row 2, Block C.
McDonald, Ralph C., Pvt., Co. E; Grave 36, Row 15, Block C.
Miller, Gerald L., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. L; Grave 19, Row 18, Block B.
Raible, Joseph R., Cpl., Co. L; Grave 23, Row 6, Block C.
Raymond, Jesse C., Sgt., Co. E; Grave 33, Row 11, Block D.
Riley, William S., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. M; Grave 19, Row 2, Block B.
Romack, Francis R., Cpl., Co. G; Grave 23, Row 21, Block D.
Schneikart, Rudolph, Pvt., Co. M; Grave 28, Row 2, Block D.
Sharp, Frank W., Cpl., Co. B; Grave 27, Row 2, Block C.
Sparling, Clare Frisbie, Cpl., Co. E; Grave 15, Row 3, Block B.
Stamm, Boyd, Pvt., Co. F; Grave 28, Row 15, Block C.
Strasser, William Edward, Pvt., MG Co., Grave 12, Row 1, Block C.
Tucker, Fred L., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. D; Grave 4, Row 22, Block G.
Weaver, Herman, Pvt., Co. E; Grave 6, Row 24, Block D.
Wheeler, Clarence W., Pvt., Co. A; Grave 29, Row 8, Block C.
Wimmer, Lawrence M., Sgt., Co. D; Grave 18, Row 11, Block C.
356th Infantry, 89th Division
Phipps, Clyde R., Pvt., Co. K; Grave 4, Row 7, Block C.
Satterlee, Ray, Pvt., Co. M; Grave 22, Row 20, Block D.
Saunders, Gladwyn M., Pvt. 1st cl., Co. L; Grave 3, Row 18. Block C.
Springer, Simon Boliver, Cpl., Co. I; Grave 36, Row 21, Block D.
Starks, William H., Pvt., MG Co.; Grave 32, Row 24, Block B.
Base Hospital Medical Dept.
Higgins, Clarence L., Pvt., BH No. 86; Grave 9, Row 10, Block A.
Pioneer Infantry
Bruce, Evert, Pvt., Co. D, 806th Pion. Inf., Grave 8, Row 23, Block C.
Battalion Tank Corps
Edmonds, Clayton E., Sgt., Co. C, 329th B. T. C.; Grave 34, Row 18, Block D.
314th Engineers, 89th Division
Nichols, John M., Pvt., Co. E; Grave 5, Row 10, Block C.
314th Military Police, 89th Division
Russell, Samuel D., Pvt., Co. B; Grave 13, Row 15, Block B.
Aviation Instruction Centers
Austrom, Fred G., 2nd Lt., 3 A. I. C.; Grave 14, Row 27, Block A.
Balloon Companies
Tisdale, Arthur S., Pvt., 116th Bal. Co., Grave 12, Row 6, Block C.
Engineers
Johnson, Frederick O., Pvt., Co. E, 20th Engrs.; Grave 15, Row 21, Block C.
James, Harry R., Pvt., Co. E, 34th Engrs,;Grave 23, Row 16, Block A.
Bakery Cos., Quartermaster Corps
Gray, Granville, Cpl., 306th Co.; Grave 8, Row 6, Block B.
Railway Artillery, Misc. QMC.
Benge, Clarence O Mech., Sup. Dep.; Grave 31, Row 14, Block A.
--------------o--------------
THE ABIDING MEMORIAL
"But each one, man by man, has won imperishable praise, each has gained a glorious grave—not that sepulchre of earth wherein they lie, but the living tomb of everlasting remembrance wherein their glory is enshrined, remembrance that will live on the lips, that will blossom in the deeds of their countrymen the world over. For the whole earth is the sepulchre of heroes; monuments may rise and tablets be set up to them in their own land, but on far-off shores there is an abiding memorial that no pen or chisel has traced; it is graven, not on stone or brass, but on the living heart of humanity. Take these men, then, for your example. Like them, remember that prosperity can be only for the free, that freedom is the sure possession of those alone who have the courage to defend it.— Pericles.
MY BUDDY
I am the soul of the Unknown Dead, and a word to the world I speak,
For my comrades passing my catafalque, weary and worn and weak.
I sleep in peace, and my resting-place is worthy of all our dead;
But what of the Buddy I left behind, and where does he find his bed?
I am the soul of the Unknown Dead, and its homage you pay to me,
But what have you done for the broken men who fared with me oversea?
They’ve passed my bier, as I lay in state, with hesitant step and slow,
And my rest is broken to know that they have still so far to go.
I prize the guerdon that you bestow, the glory the nameless won,
For we who have given our lives for you, mock not at the things you've done;
But, oh, my spirit was sad to-day, as they passed in the grand review—
For, if you give of your best to me, why not to my Buddy too?
—Edward S. Van Zile—(Life)
"My message to the people of Canada is, 'Honor the dead by helping the living'."
—Byng of Vimy.
Page 18
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice

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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page
V. F. W. Buddy Poppy
Elsie Janis, "sweetheart of the A. E. F. lends her winsome smile with a plea in behalf of the Buddy Poppy campaign, in the presence of Comrade R. B. Handy, Jr., Adjutant General and Chairman of the National Buddy Poppy Committee.
MESSAGE OF ELSIE JANIS
One of my most cherished possessions is the little Cross of Malta that I am entitled to wear as an honorary member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. I understand that I am one of the very few women who have been thus honored, and it is indeed a distinguished tribute, coming as it does from the men who made up America’s fighting forces.

I will always consider my experiences in the A. E. F. as the happiest days of my career, because it gave me the opportunity of service and a chance to enjoy the comradeship of men who were ready, if need be, to die for their country’s cause. I know the sufferings and the hardships, the weariness and pangs of homesickness, the privations and discomforts that you men had to face. I was with you during the lighter moments in the rest camps and comfortable billets, away from the mud and the endless hikes. Therefore, I can understand the bond of comradeship that welds the V. F. W. and holds it firmly together during the passing years.

Now, back in civilian life, you are proving your worth as citizens and comrades. The V. F. W. is doing splendid work in behalf of those who need the help and assistance of the more fortunate. And the welfare of these disabled buddies, I am sure, will always be uppermost in your minds.—Elsie Janis.
THE "V.F.W.” BUDDY POPPY
Since the Armistice that ended the World War, the sentiment has been growing among the Allied Nations that there should be some visible evidence of the reverence which we hold for the heroic dead who made peace possible.

It is but natural that the Poppy, the immortal flower whose blood-red petals overspread the graves and war-wrecked soil, should be forever associated with the memory of those who gave the last full measure of devotion on the fields of France. The Poppy, first brought to our attention by a poem, has become the living symbol of the souls of our dead.

The movement to make the Poppy the International Memorial Flower has spread until it has been adopted by the United States, England, France, Belgium, Canada, Australia and New Zealand.

The Veterans of Foreign Wars began selling the Poppy in 1920, and the movement has grown year by year until it has become nation-wide. The V. F. W. feel that it is a sacred honor that the great and solemn task was assigned them of fostering this movement in America. After trying to popularize the daisy, the American Legion has followed in the footsteps of the V. F. W. and has helped to make the Poppy Day a regular part of Memorial observance.

Presidents, Governor, and others in authority, have endorsed the V. F. W. Poppy campaign and have authorized the organization to copyright the name, "V. F. W. Buddy Poppy”.

All poppies sold by the V. F. W. are made by disabled service men. The V. F. W. have recognized in the poppy idea the means of achieving four worthy objects:
1. The rehabilitation of disabled comrades through the manufacture of the Buddy Poppy.
2. The perpetuation of the custom of wearing the Poppy as a memorial flower, thus continuing for all time the memory of the sacred dead.
3. A means of providing relief funds for Posts to meet distress, occasioned by sickness or unemployment among veterans.
4. A mean of extending the Service Bureau work of National Headquarters and State Departments for the benefit of our disabled comrades.
With the inspiration given by such a worthy cause, every post in the Department should conduct a Buddy Poppy sale next spring.
Wear a Buddy Poppy and "Honor the Dead by Helping the Living”.
---------------o--------------
WEAR THE POPPY
By William A. Green
President, American Federation of Labor

A poem gave the poppy a symbolic relationship to the World War. During the war the vivid scarlet flowers reminded us of battle fields stained with the blood of our young men. Since then we have used the poppy in celebrating Memorial Day.

No other symbol is so fitting for use on Memorial Day and no poppies express so well our feeling as those made by the soldiers disabled in the war.

Many of these injured men, living in hospitals and soldiers’ homes are making a courageous effort to recover their self dependence. Sick and injured soldiers have made poppies to sell on this day dedicated in memory of those who made special sacrifices for their country.
Wear the poppy on Memorial Day and help perpetuate a beautiful symbolic custom of expressing appreciation to those who made the world we inherit.
Buy your poppy from an injured "buddy” who has put into his work the love of a friend and a man’s longing for vigor and self-dependence.
Page 20
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Fairfax Airport
The Fairfax Airport of Kansas City is known throughout the country as one of the finest landing fields in the United States. We specialize in field service, quick re-fueling systems and welcome all visitors to the port. The field is but 8 minutes from the heart of both Kansas Cities.
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 21
From Post to Post
John McIntyre
John McIntyre, member of Post 112, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for bravery in action near Cheppy, France, Sept. 26, 1918.
"While a member of a platoon of wire cutters, he, with another sergeant, attacked and helped to capture an enemy machine gun nest that was holding up our advance. One officer, six men and two guns were taken in the face of intense machine gun fire."— G. 0. No. 59, W. D., 1919.
McIntyre is Secretary-Treasurer of The McIntyre Sales Corporation, Road and Bridge Materials, Brown Building, Wichita, Kansas.
-------o------
"AMERICANISM"
“Americanism is an unfailing love of country; loyalty to its institutions and ideals; eagerness to defend it against all enemies; undivided allegiance to the Flag; and a desire to secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and posterity." — Definition adopted at the joint conference of the Commanders-in-Chief of the five big veteran organizations in Washington on Feb. 18, 1927.
H. K. Cassidy
H. K. Cassidy, a charter member of Post 112, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and Croix de Guerre for gallantry in action near the Ourcq River, France, July 26, 1918.
"After his battalion commander had been killed and he himself so severely wounded that he was unable to walk without assistance, Lieutenant Cassidy (then battalion adjutant) remained on duty for three days, despite the fact that he had been ordered to the rear, and assisted the new battalion commander in re-forming the battalion. His remarkable fortitude and courage furnished an inspiration to the members of the battalion and aided materially in the attack.”—G. 0. No. 81, W. D., 1919.
Cassidy is now Lt. Col., Kansas National Guard. He is manager of the H. K. Cassidy Insurance Agency, Wichita, Kansas.
-------o------
One of the old warhorses of the Kansas V. F. W. is Moses Kerr, Commander of Post 1295, Leavenworth. Kerr is Chairman of the Funston Memorial Committee and has worked hard preparing plans to be submitted to the Legislature. He is a regular attendant at Department and National Encampments.
Howard T. Fleeson
—Photo by Goldberg.
Howard T. Fleeson, member of Post 112, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross with Oak-leaf cluster, bravery in action at St. Mihiel, France, Sept. 12, 1918.
“He and Second Lieut. Dogan H. Arthur, pilot, executed a difficult mission of infantry contact patrol, without protection of accompanying battle planes, on the first day of the St. Mihiel offensive. After being driven back twice by a patrol of nine enemy planes, they courageously made a third attempt in the face of a third attack by the same planes, found the American lines, and after being shot down, but falling uninjured in friendly territory, communicated their valuable information to headquarters.”
“An oak-leaf cluster is awarded Lieutenant Fleeson for the following act: On Oct. 30, 1918, at Carbuzancy, France, he accompanied a formation of nine planes on a photographic mission in German territory. Six planes turned back before reaching the enemy line, and the remaining three were attacked by 18 planes when they had penetrated 12 kilometers into enemy country. After his two companions, whom he tried to assist, were shot down, Lieutenant Fleeson fought his way back to his own lines, destroying two enemy planes in the combat.”—G. O. No. 27, W. D., 1919.
Fleeson is a prominent Wichita attorney. He is a member of the firm, Brooks, Brooks and Fleeson.
(Continued from Page 35)
Page 22
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 23
V. F. W. National Home
THE IDEA of a National Home was first broached at the National Encampment held at Atlantic City in August, 1924. The feasibility of the plan was referred to a committee consisting of Past Commanders-in-Chief Albert J. Rabing, Tillinghast Huston, Robert G. Woodside, the then Commander-in-Chief, John H. Dunn, Dr. Clarence L. Candler, Commander of the Department of Michigan, and Joseph Thomson of New York. This committee, after a survey of the situation, took over the present Home property at Eaton Rapids and recommended to the Tulsa Encampment in September of 1925 that the project be furthered, provided certain legal technicalities were cleared up. This was done, and the Home was finally and formally accepted by the National Council of Administration under orders of the National Encampment at a meeting in Kansas City late in 1925. From that time the Home was ours and a V. F. W. institution.

At the start, the Home and farm, appraised at approximately $65,000, was burdened with debts of $33,000, which debts have been reduced by the present corps of officials during their regime to $10,000.

From one family of a mother and five children at the time of the Tulsa Encampment the population of the Home has grown to two mothers and forty-four children as of today. This increase has really come within the last twelve months, for at the time of the Providence Encampment we only had the one widow and nine children. Through the efforts of Michigan comrades, the legislature of that state appropriated $20,000 and with that money a general community plan was secured and one building, to house twelve children was erected and furnished. This was completed and occupied in the fall of 1925, and at the same time ground was broken for the New York building. From this time until the summer of 1927 the Home was operated and interest on funded debt was paid by profits from the farm and the money accruing from life memberships and voluntary contributions from Posts and individuals. In the 1927 poppy distribution of the V. F. W. one cent on each poppy was given to the Home by order of the National Encampment netting approximately $35,000, which was used to reduce the debt by $23,000 and to establish a four and one-half mile power line, and sewerage and water system and buy additional machinery and equipment including a school bus for the farm and the Home.
In February, 1927, the revenues of the Home were increased by money accrued from a new contract for the sale of books by the Edward T. Kelly Company of Chicago through the National Council of Administration. This new contract gave to the Home 1 1/2 per cent on gross sales of the book "America", which totaled up to the present contract in April of 1928 the sum of $6,514.09. Under the present administration the income from the sale of the books has been increased. Such increase received amounts to $15,166.59.
Had it not been for the poppy money of $35,000 in 1927 and practically the same amount in 1928, the Home would have been absolutely stopped a year ago. Instead of a complete abandonment we have our debt reduced by $23,000 and three new buildings at a cost of $30,000 in course of erection. These buildings will be completed by November 1st, and will provide accommodations for forty more children. Inasmuch as all of this addition and strengthening of financial conditions has been due to poppy money, the continuance of the one cent on each poppy sold for the National Home can not be stressed too strongly. The individual interest of the V. F. W. members in the Home is reflected noticeably in the life memberships. To date there are of these but 1300, or a little over 1 per cent of the active membership of the organization nationally.
In addition to the three buildings mentioned above, the Department of Pennsylvania has started an eight children unit
Fred Stover
Past Commander-in-Chief and President of V. F. W. National Home
costing over $12,000, which will be completed this year, and several other states are preparing to erect cottages. This will give us additional space, but at the same time will compel us to reckon with an increased cost of operation.
While these statements cover the past and the present of the National Home, the future must not be forgotten; in fact, the future is the hurdle which is yet to be taken. If the idea of this Home as instilled into your present Board of Trustees is to be carried out, so many things are to be done that they really stagger us. We are called upon, in taking the place of our departed comrades, to give to their orphans not average education and average family environment, but We Are Obligated to Give Them the Best. This means the erection at our Home of schools, both ordinary and trade schools. It means the erection of a place of worship; it means the furnishing by some method of schools or factories in which the older boys and girls must be given some profession or trade fully equipped with which they may face the world upon their own hook. Such a program, while thought visionary two or three years ago, is now a stern reality. Within a very few months our population will be a hundred children and at such a figure we must think seriously of the education problem.
At the present time we transport our children to Eaton Rapids and give them the benefit of the public school system there, including the high school. For another year this is possible, but beyond that we must have our own schools, our own
(Continued on Page 48)
Page 24
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 25
United States Veterans Bureau
June 30, 1928, marked the end of the third complete fiscal year of the operation of the Wichita Regional Office of the U. S. Veterans' Bureau. Our watchword during these years has been "The maximum amount of service to all ex-service men”, and our success along this line is shown by the following report.
This Regional Office has jurisdiction over all ex-service men’s cases in the State of Kansas with the exception of ten counties in the northeastern part. This office has a total load of 7,726 cases; 2,669 of these are compensable, 3,508 have been disallowed, 1,496 cases have been compensable but are now terminated, and 53 are still pending. There were 291 new claims for compensation filed during this year and 232 claims for hospitalization as provided for by the World War Veterans’ Act.
Gen. Frank T. Hines Director, U. S. V. B.
The guardianship service of this office is a very active unit in the promulgation of guardianship and legal activities. There have been 477 guardians appointed by courts within the jurisdiction of this office, having in their charge 582 wards, 405 of whom are minors and the remaining 177 are incompetent. The guardians appointed have control over the funds apportioned to their wards by the government in conformity with the laws of Kansas, and we check the guardians to see that every ward is properly cared for.
During the past year we have hospitalized 178 men with service connected disabilities and 405 men had been hospitalized for non-service connected disabilities as provided by the World War Veterans’ Act which grants hospitalization for all ex-service men, providing government facilities are available.
Prompt service to the veterans in granting loans on Adjusted Service Certificates has been maintained and 5,075 loans were made during the past year, making the total disbursements $495,978.12. In addition, $1,396,823.94 has been paid to veterans for compensation. The operating expenses of this office amounted to approximately 8 1/2 cents of each dollar of the total expenses for the fiscal year 1928; the remaining 9 1/2 cents went directly for the benefit of the ex-service men.
The Wichita Regional Office has always received the most courteous co-operation and service from the Veterans of Foreign Wars, American Legion, D. A. V. of W. W., and the American Red Cross and were it not for the co-operation rendered by these organizations, this office would be considerably handicapped in obtaining information often necessary in order to expedite the claims of ex-service men and their dependents.
The following division and section chiefs have rendered their untiring efforts in the promotion of efficient and courteous service and to them belongs the credit for our success: John C. Newman*, Contact Representative; James C. Pappenfort, Regional Attorney; H. G. Shelly, Regional Medical Officer; T. R. Powers, Regional Adjudication Officer; Allie G. Swenney, Regional Accountant; Geo. W. Wagner, Regional Disbursing Officer; Marion A. Willis, Regional Supply Officer. —D. F. Peppers, Regional Manager.
* Capt. John C. Newman is Commander of Post No. 11.2, Veterans of Foreign Wars.
D. F. Peppers
Director, Wichita U. S. V. B.
Page 26
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 27
Funston Memorial
The idea of a Memorial to General Fred Funston was first suggested at the Department Encampment of the Veterans of Foreign Wars at Kansas City, Kansas, July 3, 1927. The matter was brought to the attention of the encampment by Comrade Moses Kerr, Commander of Post No. 1295, Leavenworth.
Comrade Kerr was appointed Chairman of the Funston Committee and instructed to work out plans for the memorial. At the next Department Encampment, held in Wichita June 29-30, a resolution was passed asking the Legislature to enact the necessary laws to cause a memorial to General Funston to be erected on the grounds of the State House, Topeka. Comrade Kerr was again appointed chairman and at the present time has a well developed plan to submit to the Legislature.
Fred Funston first attracted attention by enlisting in the Cuban Army in their war for freedom against Spain. He was captured by Spanish soldiers and confined to prison. After his release, he returned to Kansas and at the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, was made Colonel of the Twentieth Kansas Volunteers. He was sent to the Philippines with his regiment, where he soon won great fame. His capture of Aguinaldo won for him the regard of high army officials and led to his being made a brigadier-general in the regular army. At the time of his death, he was in charge of activities along the Mexican border. He was awarded a Congressional Medal of Honor for his work at Rio Grande de la Pampanga, Luzon, P. I., April 27, 1899.
Proposed Memorial to General Fred Funston, sponsored by the Department of Kansas, Veterans of Foreign Wars
Topeka, Kansas, October 31, 1928.
Mr. Leon S. Pickens,
Commander, Veterans of Foreign Wars,
831 S. Elizabeth Avenue,
Wichita, Kansas.
Dear Mr. Pickens:
Your letter of October 30th received. It will be a great pleasure to accept your invitation to serve on the Funston Memorial Committee of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. The State of Kansas should by all means have a memorial on the State House grounds for General Funston and I have many times made this suggestion. I am glad your organization is taking the initiative in this movement.
It will be a great pleasure to me to assist in every possible way.
I hope the next legislature will accept the program of the Funston Memorial Committee.
Fred Funston and I were boyhood friends, natives of Kansas, born in adjoining counties, and we were warm friends until the time of his death.
Cordially yours,
Arthur Capper,
Page 28
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 29
Red Cross Stands by the Veteran
During the World War, the Red Cross considered its first obligation was assistance and comfort in every way possible for the fighter and his family. Today the sense of the obligation has in no way diminished; if anything, the organization is even more ready to serve the ex-service men of whatever wars.

In the ten years since the Armistice, the American Red Gross has expended $65,800,000.00 in veteran relief work, and now the year of the tenth anniversary of that event still finds a great army of disabled and sick veterans requiring assistance and whose families ought also be aided, according to a recent statement by James L. Fieser, Vice-chairman of the Red Cross.

"Red Cross work in our hospital,"says Brigadier General Frank T. Hines, Director, U. S. Veterans’ Bureau, "where there are more than 25,000 disabled veterans, is of importance and should continue. The recreation, entertainment and special services, which this organization provides, make the long, tedious days brighter. But more important than this is the statement of hospital authorities that they make a vital contribution to the mental and physical welfare of the patients. This part of the work of the Red Cross is one which should be very dear to the heart of every American.”

The veritable network of Red Cross aids to ex-service men and their families, which practically blankets the United States, is so unobtrusive, effective and seasoned by its ten years of existence, that it is worthwhile occasionally to remind ourselves of it. Not only does this network cover the forty-eight states, but it also has branches extending, through Red Cross channels, into all of our possessions and virtually every foreign country, where men or women who served in the military forces of the United States, reside.

This service is called “War Service”. It provides liaison between service and ex-service men and their families on the one hand, and the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Veterans’ Bureau and Pension Bureau on the other. It is a direct fulfillment of the National Red Cross Charter obligation, “to furnish aid to the sick and wounded of armies in time of war, and to act as a medium of communication between the people of the United States and their Army and Navy”. Priority of the needs of disabled ex-service men is recognized above all else in Red Cross work.

A monthly average of 56,558 service men and ex-service men and their families are assisted by Red Cross Home Service Workers in Chapters, camps and hospitals. These workers help service
and ex-service men to straighten out their home problems, to file their compensation claims, to obtain necessary hospital treatment, and assist them in a thousand other ways to meet the situations of civil life. In addition to this activity, Red Cross workers in 316 camps
—Photo by Reed Studio
Lucy Frances Johnson
Social Worker, Red Cross, Wichita, Kas.
If the Department of Kansas ever elects an “Official Sweetheart”, that honor will undoubtedly go to Miss Johnson, as a reward for her untiring efforts in the interest of disabled service men.
and stations are assisting 245,000 men of the regulary Army and Navy by straightening out their home problems and by entertaining them in various ways.

The United States Government and the Congress have been generous to our war heroes, but the individual still requires a friendly intermediary to explain and perhaps even to prosecute his complicated claim before the Veterans’ Bureau—and to this end, 2700 Red Cross Chapters, in that number of communities, have established special work for the disabled service and ex-service people. The Red Cross considers that it has a sacred duty to carry on such relief of the veterans where the Government is not able to carry on.

There are the problems of sending the sick veteran to the hospital which may be many miles away. His home and family conditions must be adjusted so that he will not carry worries with him to prevent early recovery or improvement, and so the Red Cross worker must settle financial difficulties, keep
the wife encouraged, help in readjusting living conditions in the absence of the bread winner, and, with the aid of the Veterans’ Bureau social worker in the hospital, to maintain a constant contact between the man and his family so that courage will remain high all around.
National Red Cross Headquarters and its two branch offices at St. Louis and San Francisco, through information, advice, leadership, supervision, Chapters, field representatives, field directors, hospital workers and special representatives, co-operate with all other ex-service men’s organizations in the country, as one strong unit of action for the service of the veteran. Certainly, as long as this Red Cross organization and its high resolve exists, no person who has served his country in any military capacity need want for needed assistance.
There is only one thing upon which this great undertaking is dependent— and that is the support of the American people. “Our Roll Call occurs once each year,” Vice Chairman Fieser states, “and is the only occasion upon which the Red Cross asks for funds with which to carry on its activities. From Armistice Day to Thanksgiving this year, November 11 to 29, the Annual Roll Call will be held.” The American people are asked at that time to support these services to the veteran which are a part of the regular Red Cross program, and dependent upon the membership dues.

------------o--------------------------

Frank S. Boone, charter member of Post 112, attended the United Spanish War Veterans National Encampment at Havana. He is Past Department Chief of Staff and Past Commander, Post 112.

---------------o---------------

“And I say this, that a self-governing nation must be a self-protecting nation. Nor is it enough that we have a million men who have courage to face the guns. A million men unprepared to work together no more constitute an army than eleven boys who can kick a football make a college team.”—Dr. Lyman Abbott.
V. F. W. Membership Pays Dividends.
Page 30
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
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Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page
V. F. W. Activities
AMERICANIZATION.
The Veterans of Foreign Wars maintain a National Americanization Committee, which functions to inculcate the doctrines of patriotism and good citizenship. Captain Walter I. Joyce, National Patriotic Instructor, is Director of the Americanization Committee, and, with his staff, is located in New York City. He carries out the work through the entire year in schools and among the alien population and especially in communities in which there is a large foreign language element.
By holding of classes where the principles of Americanization are taught, by the distribution of patriotic documents and literature and by opposition to the propaganda which is submersive to American institutions and our form of government, this committee is making a splendid contribution to the welfare of America.
Respect for the Flag and its proper use is a cardinal principle of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
-------------o-------------
NATIONAL LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE.
The Veterans of Foreign Wars maintain a National Legislative Committee at Washington, D. C., to look after the affairs of interest to ex-service men and especially to our disabled comrades, through government departments or agencies. This committee sponsors and works for legislation which we believe to be fair and equitable to the men who have served their country in all of its wars.
Captain Edwin S. Bettelheim is Chairman of the National Legislative Committee and, by his untiring efforts, he has secured the enactment of a number of laws for the benefit of service men.
NATIONAL SERVICE BUREAU.
Captain Bettelheim is also Director of the National Service Bureau and is always ready to help any worthy comrade secure justice through the United States Veterans’ Bureau or the Pension Bureau. Although we limit our membership to those who have served overseas, we have never limited our activities and have always stood ready to fight for the rights of all service men and their dependents, regardless of when or where they served.
--------------0-------------
CITIZENS’ MILITARY TRAINING CAMPS.
Believing the Citizens' Military Training Camps to be one of the most effective means of combating the spreading of destructive propaganda, introduced into our schools, colleges and universities by communists and so-called pacifists, the Veterans of Foreign Wars has placed its stamp of approval on the C. M. T. C. Captain James W. Boyer is Chairman of the National C. M. T. C. Committee.
The Citizens’ Military Training Camps, as they are now conducted, are ideal institutions for bringing together annually for a month’s training the best representative young American citizens, to give them the basis of disciplinary instruction, coupled with physical and moral development, that will fit them to become influential leaders, both in time of peace and in time of national defense.
In order to bring out the best in these young men, the Commander-in-Chief has provided a medal to be given annually at each camp to the first year candidate selected by the Military Authorities as the one to merit this honor. This idea has met with the approval of the War Department.
YOU ARE ELIGIBLE
IF you served in the Army, Navy or Marine Corps of the United States on foreign soil or in hostile waters in any war, insurrection or expedition, for which
the Government issues a campaign badge or service clasp. The Veterans of Foreign Wars extends to YOU the hand of comradeship.
Mail this to any of the following:
Leon S. Pickens, Commander, 831 S. Elizabeth, Wichita, Kansas; H. A. Lopshire, Adjutant, Court House, Wichita, Kansas; R. B. Handy, Adjutant-General, National Headquarters, Memorial Building, Kansas City, Kansas.
I am interested in the V. F. W. and would like to have some information as to how I may organize a Post in my
city.
Name .............................................................
Address .................................................
I served with............................................Unit.
During War with .........................................
My service was in................................Country.
BUDDY
ARE
You
A MEMBER
OF THE V. F. W.
Page 32
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Welcome!
We extend an invitation to every Veteran of Foreign Wars to attend the State encampment in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1929. When you come to Arkansas City, everything we have here (and we have a plenty), belongs to you.
We have no key to the city to offer you. We do not keep our city, or anything in it, under lock, so there is no need for a key.
We are expecting you, so don't disappoint us.
The Arkansas City Retailers Association


Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 33
Arkansas City
Department Encampment 1929
In the year 1870 a group of ambitious pioneers settled in a community at the junction of the Arkansas and Walnut Rivers on the Southern Kansas border line. So great was the promise of the community located in the fertile valley that a permanent city site was laid out under the name of Cresswell. Two years later the town become incorporated under the name of Arkansas City.

The territory surrounding Arkansas City is, as it was in the 70’s, a distinctly agricultural locality with no particular product in dominancy. Among the principal crops are wheat, corn, alfalfa and cane. The Arkansas City market has always been a favored market for the large cattle region located within the natural production area.

Along with the entire Southwest, dairying is undergoing rapid development, due particularly to the establishing of a condensary and powdered milk plant which gave the farmers an immediate whole milk market.

The Arkansas City agricultural district is well convinced of the financial importance of diversified farming and unlike many other localities has deserted one-crop farming for the more profitable practice of diversification. Diversified farming is more easily accomplished in this region due to the fact that a great underground water system lies in a bed of sand a few feet below the surface, making it possible to grow crops which require more moisture than Mother Nature offers in the regular rainfall. The Arkansas River and its tributaries are also being recognized as potential sources of water supply for a highly developed irrigation system. The rich soil and the available water makes it possible to grow practically any crop successfully and especially do these basic agricultural requisites point to a promising increase in the acreage of such crops as sugar beets and alfalfa.

The available underground water supply, a necessary attribute to fruit farming, is responsible for the horticultural activity. A large acreage of fruit and vegetables is grown in a valley adjacent to the city and supplies not only the local market but surrounding towns, leaving a considerable quantity as raw material for a canning and preserving factory.

Growth Is Consistent.

The population increase of Arkansas City has kept well in proportion to the increase in the commercial life of the city. Not only have the commercial interests of Arkansas City amply cared for the local demand, but they have developed an important wholesale and retail market in the adjacent territory.

Within the past ten years, the population has increased over 100 per cent. The 1917 population totaled 7,500, while the present population, based on the school census and the city directory census, gives a population of 16,204. Typical of
other southwestern cities settled by native-born Americans, 90 per cent of the total population is white and native born, while only 1 per cent is foreign born. Only 3 per cent of the total population is colored.

The directory of the city lists 290 business and retail establishments, serving a retail area with a radius of 50 to 100 miles in some lines, while in other lines trade is confined to the immediate retail district. The population served by the retail life of the city approximates one-half million.
There are forty-four wholesale and manufacturing concerns located in the city with an annual payroll of $4,350,000. The wholesale area extends 100 miles to the southwest, south and southeast, into the Panhandle of Texas and the southwest portion of Oklahoma.

Arkansas City territory is blessed with another natural resource which is responsible for a great deal of the city’s prosperity. This is petroleum. Various producing fields surround the city and according to members of the oil fraternity there are still undeveloped fields in Southern Kansas and Northern Oklahoma. The gas production in the nearby fields totals 500,000,000 feet daily and an enormous acreage is yet undeveloped.
Agriculture, commerce, industry and oil have made Arkansas City a banking center of considerable size. The one state and two national banks have a total capitalization of $250,000, resources of $5,600,000, deposits of $4,800,000, and average daily bank clearings of $195,000. Other financial institutions include three local building and loan companies in addition to ten loan and investment agencies.

Advance Civic Development.

Arkansas City is justly entitled to a feeling of pride over her civic development. Four hundred acres of parks are distributed over the city. In addition, there are other recreational places, such as golf courses and swimming pools. There are sixty miles of streets of which thirty miles are paved.

Educational institutions include a junior college, senior high school, junior high school, seven grade schools, one parochial school and two business colleges. The religious life of the city is active in eighteen churches of different denominations, the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A.
Arkansas City has a population especially fitted for an industrial community. A Chamber of Commerce survey shows one-half of the laborers to be skilled, one-fourth semi-skilled and the balance unskilled with a ratio of ten men to one woman employee. Because of the city’s unity and progressive co-operation, there is no doubt in either the minds of the citizens or the outsiders but that the progress and prosperity of Arkansas City will be continuous and increasing.
Page 34
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Compliments of
Roney Monument Co.
9th St. and Troup Ave.
Kansas City, Kansas Fairfax 1193
We Set Memorials Anywhere
Compliments of
Commercial National Bank
Kansas City, Kansas
Compliments of
Whiteker Bros.
Topeka, Kansas
Compliments of
The Rosedale State Bank
Kansas City, Kansas
Compliments of
Eaton Hotel
M. N. BROWN, Prop. Wichita, Kansas
United Serum Company
Producers of High Grade products for distribution to the Veterinary profession.
WICHITA, KANSAS
The
Kansas Nut Margarine Company
Salina, Kansas
Linwood Dairy
PASTEURIZED MILK — CREAM — BUTTER MILK
Creamery Products
Butter—Creamed Cottage Cheese
1009-11-13 East Harry Street WICHITA, KANSAS
Page 35
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
From Post to Post
(Continued from Page 21)
Jack Moran
Department Senior Vice Commander; Past Department Junior Vice Commander; Commander, Heart of America Post 111, etc.
-----o-----
V. F. W. Membership Pays Dividends.
L. L. Carr
Department Junior Vice Commander
-------------o-----
ATTENTION THIRTY-FIFTH DIVISION MEN!
Now is the time to start making your plans to attend the REUNION at Hutchinson next September,
C. W. Meier
Department Judge Advocate
------0------
Every member get a member.
Harry Abrams Council of Administration
-----o------
Our Advertisers have made this book possible. They are our friends—show your appreciation by doing business with them.
H. V. Hilton, Department Historian, Past Department Junior Vice Commander, Past Department Senior Vice Commander, Adjutant Post No. 1432, Salina, is one of the Department’s most regular attendants at National Encampments. He got the habit at El Paso and has been going back ever since. He was with General Funston with the 20th Kansas.
Earl E. Shiffer Past Department Adjutant
Shiffer served two terms as Adjutant and is one of the hard workers in the Department. He, with the assistance of a few loyal helpers, has recently revived the inactive Post at Parsons.
(Continued on Page 37)
Page
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
W. A. L. THOMPSON
Hardware Co.
DISTRIBUTORS OF
EVEREADY RADIOS
BARTON WASHERS
READY-LITE LAMPS
MONOGRAM HEATERS
KITCHEN KOOK STOVES
READY GLO and RADIANT HEATERS
Topeka Dodge City
The
Liberty Life
Insurance Company
TOPEKA, KANSAS
Officers and Directors
WILDER S. METCALF,
Chairman of the Board
CHAS. A. MOORE, President
WILL W. McBRIDE, Vice-President
ELI G. FOSTER, 2nd Vice-Pres. and Treas.
CLAUD L. CLARK, Secretary and Actuary
Dr. H. B. HOGEBOOM, Medical Director
OTIS S. ALLEN, General Counsel
CHESTER WOODWARD
DR. CHARLES S. HUFFMAN
JAMES R. PLUMB
EDWARD C. WILLS
Superintendent of Agencies
COMPLIMENTS
of
Kansas City Life Insurance Company
Home Office
Kansas City, Missouri

Compliments
of
a
Friendl
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 37
From Post to Post
(Continued from Page 35)
I believe in the V. F. W. because of its constructive leadership, its fine ideals, stirring history, and because it binds into hallowed comradeship America’s Old Guard—the men who have fought her battles in foreign lands and waters during seventy years of campaigning—
THE GOLDEN AGE OF AMERICAN CHIVALRY. — J. I. Billman, National Historian.
Louis Rosenberg Department Chief of Staff
Photo by Reed Studio
Staff Sergeant Louis Rosenberg, U. S. Army, Department Chief of Staff, has been Cavalry Instructor, Kansas National Guard, for the past eight years. "Rosy” is one of the most active V. F. W. workers in the Department. He is Past Department Junior Vice Commander, Past Department Senior Vice Commander, Past Department Chief of Staff, Past Department Deputy Chief of Staff, Past Department Inspector, etc.
In addition to the Department offices, he has held a number of Post offices. As Chief of Staff he has helped organize several Posts.
Rosenberg has the distinction of being eligible for the V. F. W. from three different campaigns, Cuba, Mexico and France. He is Captain in the U. S. R.
Every member get a member.
Spencer-Ralston Post 1254, Arkansas City, is one of the young Posts of the Department. The Arkansas City boys will be hosts to the next Department Encampment.
Officers of Post 1254 are: Commander, James F. Pickens; Senior Vice Commander, T. M. Billing; Junior Vice Commander, Herman Magnus; Quartermaster, A. E. McAdam; Adjutant, Ira Hinsey; Officer of the Day, Bill Buffington; Post Advocate, Oscar Renn; Surgeon, Dr. R. C. Young; Trustee, Harry Pfisterer.
McAdam and Young hold the same office in the Department as they do in the Post.
Captain John C. Newman, Department Service Officer and Commander of Post No. 112, is a veteran of two wars, having served as First Sergeant of U. S. Volunteers during the Spanish-American War and as Captain during the World War. Captain Newman is a veteran National Guardsman, having served as an officer in Missouri and Kansas Guard units for ten years. He was commissioned a Captain in the Reserve Corps, U. S. A.,March 19, 1917. On January 5, 1918, he was appointed quartermaster of Evacuation Hospital No. 10 and went overseas with that unit, serving with it through the St. Mihiel drive and the Argonne campaign. He is now connected with the Wichita Regional Veterans’ Bureau.
V. F. W.
America's "Old Guard"
The Veterans of Foreigh Wars
Organized 1899
An association of men who have fought America's foreign wars on land and sea
Over There Post 112, Wichita, was organized soon after the World War. After a good start, it became inactive for a while. It was re-organized in 1924 and has been going strong ever since. It has furnished two Department Commanders, a Department Adjutant, Senior Vice Commander, Junior Vice Commander, Two Chief of Staffs, Department Inspector, Department Service Officer, etc. The Post has been host to two Department Encampments.
Captain John C. Newman is Commander; Tom Alexander, Adjutant; Herbert Raines, Quartermaster.
-------o------
Stacy Lewis, member of Spencer-Ralston Post 1254, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for bravery in action near Soissons, France, July 22, 1918.

"He voluntarily organized a machine-gun crew, moved forward in front of the Infantry under heavy machine-gun and shell fire, killed an entire machine-gun crew, and captured the gun.” G. O. No. 15, W. D., 1919.
Frank Stillwell, Council of Administration; Past Commander, Heart of America Post No. 111; Past Supreme J. V. C., M. O. C.; Past Grand Commander, Kansas M. 0. C.; Past National Color Sergeant. Distinguished Service Cross, Croix de Guerre, etc.
“When his section of a platoon had been caught in an enemy barrage and all cannoneers of the platoon had been either killed or wounded, Sergeant Stillwell made repeated trips into tne shelled area to remove the wounded. He assumed command of the platoon after the commanding officer had been evacuated and skillfully performed the duties involved therein.”
G. O. No. 37, W. D., 1919.
(Continued on Page 39)
Page 38
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
|
Reinhardt Bakery
Wichita's Oldest Independent Bakery
626 N. Main Phone Mkt. 1493
Compliments of
A. 0. THOMPSON
Lumber Co.
9th and Garfield KANSAS CITY, KANS.
Drexel Thirty-Thirty
Storen Coal
20th and Central KANSAS CITY, KANSAS
Drink Cocoa-Cola
in Bottles
The Best Drink in the World
Cocoa-Cola Bottling Works
Wichita, Kansas
The Knorr Mercantile Company
Wholesale Dry Goods
619 to 627 E. William St. Wichita, Kan.
Home of Lincoln Work Clothing

-THE-
National Lighting Co.
Manufacturers of
Lighting and Hydro-Pep Cooking Systems
Arkansas City, Kansas
Shannon & Bloomgarten
Wm. P. SUPPLE
SASH AND DOORS Interior Finish
5th and Everett FX 1558
KANSAS CITY, KANS.
THE MONUMENT MAN
605 East 10th Avenue
Topeka, Kansas


Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 39
(Continued from Page 37)
Barney Yanofsky
Barney is the young man with the unpronounceable name that presides over the destiny of Foreign Service.
-----o------
Herbert J. Snodgrass, 911 Commerce Building, Kansas City, Missouri, is the National Council Member for the Ninth District, made up of Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Iowa. He is Past Department Commander of Missouri and has been closely connected with National Affairs in the V. F. W. His outstanding work has been in connection with the investigation of ex-service men confined in Federal Prisons which has resulted in a number of these cases having a re-hearing.
Snodgrass is connected with the J. C. Nichols Inv. Co., Kansas City, Missouri.
-----o------
John W. Wood, Past Department Commander, has been the National Legislative Deputy for Kansas for the past two years. He is a member and Past Commander of Post 112.
M. L. Euthon Past Commander; Post 112
Euthon is Sergeant Instructor, R. O. T. C., University of Wichita.
I like that word COMRADE. To me it means more than brother and but little less than love. It brings back memories of grim, gray transports; camps pitched on foreign shores; weary hikes; nights in the trenches and unforgettable days on bloody battle fields. Every man in the V. F. W. feels like I do about this. Every member "speaks my language”. Men who are not eligible can not understand the Veteran language.— J. I. Billman.
Mrs. George Norris Arkansas City.
It is through the efforts of Mrs. Norris that we are able to publish, for the first time, a Complete Directory of Kansas Dead, now buried in France.
Charles C. Hicks
Department Inspector; Past Department
Judge Advocate; Past Department Inspector; Quartermaster Heart of America Post 111, etc.
------o------
General Wilder S. Metcalf of Topeka is one of the oldest members of the V. F. W. in Kansas, having been Commander in Chief of the Army of the Philippines before the amalgamation He is now Chairman of the Board of Directors, Liberty Life Insurance Company, Topeka, Kansas.
------o------
Congressman W. A. Ayres, Wichita, Kansas, was recently made an Honorary Member of Post 112 in recognition of his work for ex-service men of all wars. He is also an Honorary Member of the U. S. W. V.
------o------
A. D. Sutton Council of Administration
From Post to Post
Page 40
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
FROM
The Public Utility Investment Company
NATHAN L. JONES, Pres.
Salina, Kansas
Kansas City, Topeka, Wichita, Hutchinson, Eureka,
Enid
Compliments
of
Wichita Water Co.
The Home of Good Millwork
United
Millwork
Co.
Special Millwork of all Kinds

QUALITY SERVICE

Wichita, Kansas
The Capital Iron Works Co.
Established 1876
H. K. BROOKS, President
Structural and Ornamental Iron Works
Specializing in the Design of Reinforced Concrete and Steel Structure
Steel Fabricators and Erectors, General Foundry and Machine Work
East Seventh Street and Santa Fe Tracks
TOPEKA, KANSAS
Greetings and Good Wishes
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 41
29th National Encampment Scenes
The snappy patrol of Post No. 967, Akron, Ohio, trophy winners at the 1928 Encampment.
The band of Post No. 802, Hammond, Indiana.
Detroit Police Post's quartet of songbirds, a real hit of the convention.
The Auxiliary drum and bugle corps of Attleboro, Mass., lined up for annual military parade
Strut - and how! Drum major of Lansing's championship corps
Lieut. Charles E. Weickhardt, National Naval Liaison Officer, (Captain Walter I. Joyce) and Department Commander Leon S. Pickens of Kansas halt a genial chat to pose.
Past Commander-in-Chief Strayer and Sergeant-at-Arms Lake at the opening of the V. F. W. Air Circus.
Fifth prize of 29th National Encampment drum and bugle corps contest, Post No. 854, Fremont, Neb.

Winners of the 1928 National Championship drum and bugle corps prize, Post No. 701, Lansing, Mich.
Past National Chaplain J. B. Head, presenting the trophy that recognized Warren, Ohio, Post No. 1090 Boy's Band as the official Encampment band.
Page 42
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
COMPLIMENTS
of
The
Proctor & Gamble Manufacturing Company
Kansas City, Kansas
Gold Medal
Crackers
Soda or Graham


EVERY MEAL EVERY DAY
Made With Malt and Milk
Waxtite Family Caddies
Southwest Cracker Co.
Wichita, Kansas
HOW Very Thankful everyone was ten years ago to hear that great Word. Armistice meant much to all the World, but to most of us here in Our Grand Old U. S. A. it meant the ending of the War wherein so many of our Noble Young Men had given their Lives, Health and Happiness for Democracy.

But still wars go on right here in the very heart of Our County. For the past two years we have been fighting desperately to protect our Business and the Ice Consumers of Wichita. Our very existence has saved the people of the City more than Five Hundred Thousand Dollars in the past two seasons. We know that the cause is a worthy one and we are still asking for volunteers, asking that the People of Wichita Support and Co-operate with
The Wible Ice and The Wichita Ice Delivery
1004 S. Hydraulic Phone Mkt. 3900
The
Peoples National Bank
of Kansas City, Kansas
7th and Minnesota
Capital $200,000.00 Surplus $100,000.00
Member Federal Reserve System
F. M. HOLCOMB___________________Chairman of Board
K. L. BROWNE______________________________President
J. E. ANDERSON______________________Vice-President
J. H. SANDELL_____________________________Cashier
C. L. WILSON________________________Assistant Cashier
K. L. BROWNE, JR___________________Assistant Cashier
Armistice!
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 43
29th National Encampment Scenes


The attractive Minneapolis Auxiliary drill team getting ready to take part in the mammoth military parade at Indianapolis.
Five fair Auxiliary delegates from Oregon, representing Auxiliaries Nos. 907 and 1325, winners of the “greatest distance" trophy.
A portion of the New Jersey delegation at the 29th National Encampment, headed by National Councilman John Mulligan, third from the left.
A quartet of Department Commanders, left to right, Karl Feist, Ohio; J. F. Daley. Connecticut; George C. Travers, New York, and Joseph Hanken, Mass.
The long and! short of Akron, O., Post No. 967 Patrol, Forest: Good, the tallest member of the team and Harold McGrath, aged 7, mascot.
Sgt. Daniel Cremens, Los Angeles, presents Governor Jackson of Indiana with a basket of flowers, Department Commander Darold De Coe (2nd from left) and others assisting
(Left to right) Dept. Commander Van Zandt Pa., Kittie Mulhall, Chicago, Past Nat'l Chaplain, J. B. Head. Mrs. Head and Junior Vice-Commander-in-Chief Elect Wolman.
A group of New York state delegates posing for the camera at Monument Place Circle.
National President-Elect Bessie Hanken of the Ladies' Auxiliary and her staff.
Conn, delegates with Dept. Commander Daley (center), and Auxiliary President Mrs. Helen Shanahan


Page 44
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
THIS SPACE
Is dedicated to the Heroic Dead and the equally
Heroic Living
THE FEDERAL RESERVE LIFE Insurance Company
Home Office, Kansas City, Kans.
SOUTHWESTERN BELL TELEPHONE CO
BELL SYSTEM
Page 45
View of Montsec, France, upon which the memorial to commemorate the St. Mihiel operation will he located.
The
National Old Line Life Insurance Company

For Peace of Mind
PROTECTION AS GOOD AS THE BEST A Home Company
Bitting Building, Wichita, Kansas
CARL R. WHITE ----------- President
H. E. CLARE------------------------------------Vice President and Secretary
C. F. ROSS------------------------------------------------Assistant Secretary
HAIGHT, DAVIS, HAIGHT --------------_____________________________________Actuaries
J. H. LEE--------------------------------------Vice President and Treasurer
J. W. GREENLEAF ----------------------------------------------_____Vice President
DR. LOE A. SUTTER---------------------------------------------Medical Director
H. W. HAVY----------------------------------------------------General Counsel

Leon S. Pickens, District Manager

Insurance Service

We have openings for District
Agents with a Company with a
record of fifty years of honorable dealings. Good choice of Territory.
Minnesota Mutual Life Insurance Company
415 Beacon Building, Wichita, Kansas Old Line Legal Reserve
Compliments of
The Guarantee Title & Trust Co
Wichita, Kansas Ground floor, Beacon Building
Page 46
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
JAMES A. ALLEN, Pres. W. J. BRYDEN, Secretary The Pioneer
The Victory LIFE Mortgage Co.
Insurance Company
HOME OFFICE FARM
218 New England Bldg. KANSAS CITY OKLA.
TOPEKA, KANSAS LOANS
ISSUES ALL KINDS OF STANDARD POLICIES The
Pioneer Mortgage Co.
If Interested Write to
W. J. BRYDEN, Sec’y. Mulvane Building
At Above Address TOPEKA, KANSAS
The Road Supply Brokers Office and
& Metal Co. Warehouse Co.
Armco Products Wichita's Finest Warehouse
143 N. Rock Island
Market 2410
M. E. CUYKENDALL
General Manager
DRAINAGE ENGINEERING The
SERVICE Houston - Doughty
Lumber Co.
1101 East First St.
Phone Market 4074
Topeka :: Kansas Wichita, Kansas
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Page 47
Dept. of Kansas
Mrs. Nannie Workman President Parsons
Mrs. Busha Edwards Sr. Vice President Fort Dodge
Mrs. Julia Euthon Jr. Vice President Wichita
Mrs. Anna Poe Secretary Wichita
Mrs. Ella Johnson Treasurer Fort Dodge
Mrs. Edna Thompson Chaplain Wichita
Mrs. Madeline Rosenberg Conductor Wichita
Mrs. Iva Carr Guard Fort Dodge
Mrs. Lillian Johnson Patriotic Instructor Fort Dodge
Mrs. Flora Best Trustee Fort Dodge
Mrs. Lula Bryant Trustee Fort Dodge
Mrs. Lottie Merrill Trustee Parsons
Mrs. Trixie Beeler Council of Administration Parsons
Mrs. Rose Erwin Council of Administration Parsons
Mrs. Clauda Hoffman Council of Administration Parsons
Mrs. Adele Ricketts Council of Administration Parsons
Mrs. Ella Lopshire Council of Administration Wichita
Mrs. Letha Stillwell Council of Administration Kansas City
Mrs. W. C. Keith Council of Administration Kansas City
Mrs. H. J. Raines Council of Administration Wichita
Auxiliary Over There No. 112 Anna Poe City Wichita
Mary Sturges No. 1520 Flora Best Fort Dodge
Heart of America No. 111 Letha Stillwell Kansas City
Brown-Bishop No. 704 Nannie Workmen Parsons
Harry L. Edwards No. 1295 Minnie Kerr Leavenworth
Frank Adams No. 408 Rose Greenwood Kansas City
George White No. 56 Delvina Lambert Leavenworth
Beck-Young No. 1250 Florence Lattimore Kansas City
West Side Machine Works
Engineers and Machinists
General Machine Work and Ice Machine Repairing
An Up-to-Date Welding Department in Conjunction With Shop
Mechanical Engineer at Your Service
3898 Drexel
3rd and Minnesota Avenue KANSAS CITY, KANSAS
Drilling Tools Fishing Tools
Swan Underreamers Williamsport Wire Rope Lucy Rotaries
The
Bridgeport Machine Company
Wichita, Kansas
Branches Thruout the Oil Fields
LadIes Auxiliary
Page 48
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
F. D. HALL C. M. ANDREWS R. E. LIGHTNER
Pres. Vice-Pres. Treas.
We Insure
ANYTHING
Against
EVERYTHING
And
Loan Money on Improved
City Real Estate
Monarch Investment Company
WICHITA, KANSAS
The
Merchants National Bank
Capital $200,000 Surplus $100,000
J. ERNEST JONES_______________________President
E. L. COPELAND___________________Vice-President
W. L. DEAN_________________________Vice-President
C. L. CARLSON___________________________Cashier
R. M. BUNTEN _______________________Asst. Cashier
A. H. SAVILLE_______________________Asst. Cashier
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY
Topeka, Kansas
V. F. W. National Home
(Continued from Page 23)
teachers and our own equipment. This in itself is a proposition entailing of large sums of money, but is one that is so essential that it will have to be faced and faced now. We must prepare within the next few months for the problem of education which will be facing us eighteen months hence.
It must not be forgotten, Comrades, that we have attempted to take the place insofar as the rearing of children is concerned of our Comrades who have gone before. It must not be forgotten that in so doing we have obligated ourselves to a trust not only to the living but to the dead. It must not be forgotten that we have gone so far that we can not turn back. It must not be forgotten that we can only go ahead with the usual V. F. W. spirit and complete the task which we have assumed as our burden.
Mindful of the future, and with these conditions at our doorstep, the Board of Trustees of the National Home desires to awaken new interest and quicken old interest in this project, to the end that we can faithfully say to ourselves when we think of the work we have done, "Well done, thou good and faithful servant".
It is better to have lived in the hearts of little children than to have a monument at the end of the road.
Prepared by Fred Stover, President, C. L. Candler, Vice-President,
H. N. Duff, Treasurer,
V. F. W. National Home.
Children From National Home
A Group of Children at the V. F. W. National Home.
Clyde Miller, member of Post 112, is in the hospital at Muskogee. Miller is a Spanish War man. He went across on the raft with Funston at Rio Grande de la Pampanga, Luzon, P. I. April, 1899.
-------------o--------------
One of the old "war horses” of Over There Post 112 is S. P. Peterson, Government Meteorologist at Wichita. Peterson is Chairman of the Relief Committee. He served in the Navy during the Spanish-American War in Cuban and Porto Rican waters.
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
CAPITALIZE YOUR THRIFT
Invest Your Savings in
THE KANSAS POWER AND LIGHT CO.
7 Per Cent Cumulative Preferred Stock
This is an opportunity to invest under ideal conditions.
Public Utility securities are rated equal to good municipal bonds for safety.
Our Preferred Stock is supported by the combined earnings of all our associated companies in Kansas.
The stock is non-taxable in Kansas, and the yield is 6 Per Cent net.
The dividends are exempt from the Normal Federal Income Tax.
The business is firmly established and permanent.
Write, Telephone or Call for Information.
Topeka, Kansas
701 Kansas Avenue Telephone 7732
A Community Builder
It is a privilege as well as financial advantage to help build the Home Town—the Home State. The Farmers & Bankers Life Insurance Company invests its premiums in the territory it serves, helping to make possible the building of schools, bridges, roads and city and farm improvements. It maintains bank balances locally where its representatives operate. It is a COMMUNITY BUILDER, and it is prepared to render unsurpassed service in anything pertaining to the business of Life Insurance thru its excellent staff of General Agents and local Representatives.
The FARMERS & BANKERS
Life Insurance Company
H. K. LINDSLEY, President J. H. STEWART, Vice Pres.
FRANK B. JACOBSHAGEN, Secretary
Wichita, Kansas
"POLICIES THAT PROTECT"
Tenth Anniversary of the Armistice
Kansas Gas and Electric Company
"At Your Service"
No Man’s Land—Ten Years Ago
We see No Man's Land again -- barren and deserted, pocked with shell holes and dotted with rotting corpses. On each side is a narrow, crooked trench, filled with desperate men, the death look in their eyes. Up and down runs a tornado of shell fire, the shells bursting in running crashes, with driving squalls of shrapnel which sweep the ground and a remorseless storm of rifle and machine gun bullets which rain along the scanty parapets.
That is the picture of the advanced trenches on November 11, 1918—just a decade ago.
The clock points to eleven— and as if some tremendous miracle had happened, the uproar stops. The shrapnel ceases to hail and lash; the high explosives no longer toss their black fountains of earth and smoke skyward; the machine-guns end their soulless rat-tat-tat.
Men look into each other's eyes. First they see wonder there - then comes understanding.
The Armistice! Reprieve from death! Home and loved ones! Peace at last!
Up and down the trenches sweeps a swelling burst of cheering. Now it rises to crescendo; now it sinks to rise again.
Thus did they greet, the first Armistice Day in the trenches of France.
No day in our country’s history means more—particularly to the veterans of the World War—than Armistice Day. And this company wishes once more to express the never-ending gratitude of the American people for the heroism which won that Armistice Day and assured Americans forever of liberty, justice and opportunity for all.

Original Format

9" X 12" bound typed and printed magazine, including photographs; the magazine itself is enclosed in protective cardboard cover