Wellington Public Library Scrapbook - 1871-1971
Collection: No Collection

Title

Wellington Public Library Scrapbook - 1871-1971

Subject

History--Wellington Public Library, Wellington Kansas

History--Prentis Club Library, Wellington, Kansas

History--Prentis Club

Description

This Wellington Public Library Scrapbook covers the 100 year time span of 1871 when Wellington was founded to 1971, when Wellington celebrated its 100th Anniversary. It includes newspaper clippings, copies of newspaper clippings, the history of the library, and the history of the Prentis Club that founded the library.

Creator

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Source

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Publisher

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Date

1871-1971

Rights

Reproduced with permission from the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.

In Copyright In Copyright

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

Scrapbooks

Coverage

1871-1971



Citation
Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas, “Wellington Public Library Scrapbook - 1871-1971
,” Digital Wellington, accessed August 12, 2020, https://wellington.digitalsckls.info/item/108.
Text

The number of books in the library is now 26,882 of which 8,595 are juvenile books and 18,287 adult books.
61,388 books were checked out by the 4,l64 registered borrowers, or about l5 books each. 275 of the patrons are rural people who are required to pay a small fee for the right to borrow books.
Circulation in the children’s department has increased since the separate children’s library was opened up February 12. The room originally used as a clubroom and later used as an overflow classroom, has been remodeled and redecorated. The children have responded by checking out 3,671 books during the month of March as compared to 2,680 read by adults during the same period of time.
High school students writing research papers have been making use of all the library’s resources, using clippings, magazines, pamphlets and all types of non-fiction books.
Though more non-fiction than fiction is read now than b.t. (before television), there are still people who read for recreation. The past year’s record shows the total circulation for fiction and non-fiction practically even.
The present library board members include Mr. Wm. Murphy, president; Mrs. Arthur Champeny, secretary; Mr. Earl M. Peters, treasurer; Mrs. H. C. Davidson, Mr. Charles Watson and Mr.
Richard Waln. Mrs. George Renn's term has recently expired and a new member is to be appointed in her place. Mr. Harold Sanner, Mayor, is also an ex-officio member of the library board.
Marie's green scrapbook
p. 65 - library

People's Voice — March 18, 1915
Site for the Carnegie Library Has Been Chosen and Purchased The board selected site now occupied by Long-Bell Lumber Co.
Carnegie Library Board was organized about a year ago and has the following as members: George H. Hunter, chairman, Mrs. Ella R. Clayton, secretary, E. B. Roser, treasurer, M. C, Burton, H. L. Buttrey,
Mrs. W. H. Maddy, Mrs. Ed Hackney, and Miss Maude Price.

April 29, 1915 — Mr. Carnegie Comes Across Donates Wellington $17,500 for library.
Plans are here and the library committee is to start things going right away.

(there is additional in this article — People's Voice
April 29, 1915

People’s Voice — May 13, 1915
The building committee of the Carnegie Library Board named C. W. Terry of Wichita architect and approved plans and specifications. As plans now stand, building 81 by 46 feet.
Marie's green scrapbook p. 65 - library
Wellington Daily News — June 25, 1946
3oth Birthday Wellington City Library
(picture of the library)
The library formally received: Copied from Wellington Daily News,
June 27, 1916 — Wellington's new Carnegie Public Library was formally
turned over to the library board at a special meeting, Monday afternoon, June 26,

1916, The librarian, Miss Gretchen Flower and the assistant, Miss Kate Hackney,
were also formally appointed to their positions.

Miss Flower has already commenced work on the selection of suitable books and expects to have the library thoroughly equipped and systematically arranged by September when she leaves to resume her duties at Emporia College Library.

Some time in the near future the library will be formally opened to the public with a reception to be held in the building. This will be held shortly after the arrival of the furniture which has already been ordered."

The public is invited to visit the library on Wednesday, June 26, the 30th birthday of the library and to examine the many books for enjoyable and informative reading. The City has added many improvements to the building through the years and the most recent are the new fluorescent ceiling lights, the step rail, club room redecorated and shrubbery planted and fluorescent rack lights will be added as soon as the figures arrive.

Book marks will be given to each individual visiting the library on Wednesday.

The present board is president, Claude Kissick, vice-president, Mrs. W. M. Martin, secretary, Miss Katharine Knowles, treasurer, Ellis Carr, Mrs. E. T. Hackney, Amos Belsley, Everett Mitchell, Charles Hangen, and Mrs. George Renn. Mrs. E. T. Hackney was appointed by G. W. Hunter on the first public library board and has served continuously since that date.

Mrs. Dey Retires After 30 Years Of Tireless Service in City Library
She came into the Wellington Public Library in 1928 to help on a part-time basis, and this month Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey officially closed 30 years of outstanding service to the citizens of Wellington when she retired as head librarian.

Mrs. Dey, interviewed at her home at 404 N. Olive st., said that she looks on her career with a great deal of satisfaction.

“Wellington is a good reading town,” she said. “We have had fine, dedicated library boards throughout the years. And I think the location of the library is ideal—it is centrally located for schools, for the business district, for residential areas, and for visitors to our community, many of whom visit our library, and, I am happy to say, praise it.”

Perhaps her most difficult task, Mrs. Dey explained, was in buying properly so that a modest budget could be used to buy the most good books for the most people with a wide variety of reading tastes.

The success of her purchasing program, and her unfailing courtesy and expert assistance are amply testified to by the many persons calling the Daily News and talking to its many representatives in recent days about the personal and professional attributes of Mrs. Dey.
The reason she gave to the board for her retirement was straightforward and simple — “I have worked long enough,” Mrs. Dey told them, “and I do not feel that it would be fair to go on to a point at which the quality of my work might suffer.”

Mrs. Dey emphasized to the Daily News that she had always tried to avoid any books that were trashy or merely sensational, but that she had never attempted to be a crusader in raising or dictating to the reading habits of the public.

“You can help children to form a taste for good books,” she declared, “but about two-thirds of the budget goes for adult books, [part of newspaper missing] not felt it my place to [part of newspaper missing] prove the reading selection [part of newspaper missing] adults. They are old [part of newspaper missing] to know what they want. [part of newspaper missing] like fiction or non-fiction [part of newspaper missing] offer that. If they like [part of newspaper missing] or westerns, we have [part of newspaper missing] full of them.”

Dey said that the trend in recent years seems to be [part of newspaper missing] the popularity of biographies and other non-fiction
books such as “Please Don’t Eat the Daisies,” shorter and more lightly written than in the past.

“I favor them myself,” she said, along with travel books and pioneer stories, although a librarian has so much detail work, including the reading of reviews, that she usually has little time for reading for pleasure.’

Asked about the influence of television on reading, Mrs. Dey said that she noticed that some of the most frequent patrons of the library dropped off almost altogether when the family television was first installed, and then gradually came back to their former check-out levels. Another development has been that children, as young as third-graders come in looking for books about space and space travel, of which there is a lack at their reading level.

Mrs. Dey began working in the library on a substitute basis after the death of her husband in 1927. She had taught school in Oklahoma City before her marriage and considered that as a career, but chose library work instead. Ten years ago she accepted the post of head librarian.

The Deys have strong family ties, and Mrs. Dey is intensely interested in the careers and doings of her children: Miss Dorothy Dey of the Wellington high school (Continued to Page 2, Col. 4)
Mrs. McCoy Retires
Mrs. Olive McCoy, librarian at the Wellington Public Library for the past 22 years, has retired effective December 31,1970. Betty McGaughey will succeed Mrs. McCoy as head librarian.

Mrs. McCoy will be volunteering her services to the library after her retirement. She is interested in taking books to shut-ins and helping with the Talking Book Program.
Mrs. Olive McCoy
Kansas Library Bulletin March 1971
Mrs. Betty McGaughey demonstrates program Wellington Daily News 5-29-1971 (Daily News photo by Marilyn Rudd)

Talking Book proqram at Library Here
Jack is a 34-year old farmer who was blinded last year in an auto accident. Sarah is a 77-year old widow who is sightless because of an eye disease. Cindy was paralyzed from the neck down in a playground accident shortly after her tenth birthday two years ago. What do they have in common? All three are among the more than 600 south central Kansas residents who use the new statewide talking book program through their local public libraries.

The talking book program was established by the Library of Congress in 1931 and the recorded books have been available nationwide for approx. 30 years. However, until less than
a year ago, blind and physically handicapped residents of Kansas had to request their talking book service from Missouri because this state had no facility for serving the ordinary library needs of the handicapped.

In July, 1970, a new division of the State Library of Kansas was established to act as the coordinating agency for six talking book sub-regional libraries in the state. These six subregional libraries are all now in full operation, including two in this area—the Hutchinson Public Library and the Wichita Public Library—so service is now available to every eligible blind or handicapped resident
of Kansas.

According to the Library of Congress, national sponsor of the program, anyone who has a visual or physical disability which prevents' them from reading or handling conventional book material is eligible for free talking book service. Once certified, the patron is automatically sent a talking book playing machine which is nothing more than a simplified lightweight phonograph machine, It is designed to play at 16 rpm for books and 8 rpm for magazines. In addition to the machine, there are a number of free attachments available to aid those with hearing difficulty or with muscular-motor disabilities. The machine and attachments are free — there is no enrollment fee, no rental charge or subscription price.

The program operates nationally
from Library of Congress funding and that agency esti-
mates the program costs about 3 1/2 cents per year per certified reader.
Books range from stories
for pre-schoolers to adult best-
sellers and the free magazines run from READER’S DI-
GEST to JACK & JILL. The
books and magazines are loaned by mail and because of postal regulations, there is no
postage on any of the materials in the program.
Public libraries throughout the area are assisting in the talking book program by acting as reader’s advisors and certification agencies. Mrs. Betty McGaughey of the Welling- ton Public Library is a part of the program and she is eager to hear from people who would like to be involved in the talking book program. for more information, call 326-2011.
CARNEGIE CORPORATION
OF NEW YORK
576 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK

JAMES BERTRAM
Secretary

April 19th 1915.

Mrs. Ellen R. Clayton,
Secy., Library Board,
Wellington, Kansas.

Dear Madam:-
Responding to your communication on behalf of Wellington, Kansas, if the City agrees by resolution of Council to maintain a Free Public Library at a cost of One thousand seven hundred and fifty Dollars ($1,750) a year, and provides a suitable site for the building, Carnegie Corporation of New York will be glad to give Seventeen thousand, five hundred Dollars ($17,500) to erect a Free Public Library Bilding for Wellington, Kansas.

It should be noted that the amount indicated is to cover the cost of the Library Bilding complete, ready for occupancy and for the purpose intended.
Before any expenditure on billing or plans is incurred, the approval of proposed plans by Carnegie Corporation of New York must be secured, to obtain which pleas send tentative plans for inspection.

Very truly yours,
CARNEGIE CORPORATION OF NEW YORK Jas. Bertram
Secretary.
Enclosures (3)
Carnegie Library

April 10, 1915 location purchased from Long Bell Lumber Co. for $3500

Dec 1915 Carnegie Corp agreed to give City $17,500 for a library building with understanding that City would spend 10% of amount each year in maintenance.

June 1916 Board of Directors accepted building from J. H. Mitchell, contractor

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY

Plans are Adopted and Contractors
are figuring on Their bids.

A drawing in Carnegie new Carnegie library building as planned by Architect
C. W. Terry, of Wichita is now on exhibition in the display windows of H. H. Roser‘s jewelry store, Mr. Roser being chairman of the Public library board. The building is an ornate structure of two stories, with high basement, the exterior walls of gray tapestry brick and the trimmings of Carthage' limestone. The roof is of red Spanish tiles. A flight
of steps leads up a small portico at the front entrance with pillars on either side supporting an ornamental pediment. The general style of architecture is colonial with classical treatment of details.

The plans and specifications, have been submitted to a number of contractors, and bids are to be opened on Monday. September 6th, The architect’s estimate of cost is approximately $16,000. 'The remaining $1,000 of the fund supplied by the Carnegie foundation will be devoted to the furnishing of the building though it is thought this sum will hardly be sufficient to equip the building in the manner desired by the board. However this amount will provide the bulk of the funds needed for the purpose.

The building is planned for a library and reading room exclusively, the funds at the disposal talked of.

The CARNEGIE LIBRARY.
Plans are Adopted and Contractors are figuring on Their Bids.

A drawing of the new Carnegie library building as planned by Architect C. W. Terry, of Wichita, is now on exhibition in the display windows of E. B. Roser's jewelry store, Mr.
Roser being chairman of the Public Library board. The building is an ornate structure of two stories, with a high basement, the exterior walls of gray tapestry brick and the trimmings of Carthage limestone. The roof is of red Spanish tiles, A flight of steps leads up a small portico at the front entrance, with pillars on either side supporting an ornamental pediment. The general style of architecture is colonial with classical treatment of details.

The plans and specifications have been submitted to a number of contractors, and bids are to be opened on Monday. September 6th. The architect's estimate of cost is approximately $10,000. The remaining $1,000 of the fund supplied by the Carnegie foundation will be devoted to the furnishing of the building, though it is thought this sum will hardly be sufficient to equip the building in the manner desired by the board. However, this amount will provide the bulk of the funds needed for the purpose.

The building is planned for a library and reading room exclusively, the funds at the disposal of the board not being sufficient to include an assembly room or rooms for social purposes as at one time talked of.

The Wellington Monitor-Press
9-1-15
Library Plans Changed

Certain minor changes have been made in the plans of the new Carnegie library, which involve the use of Bedford stone instead of concrete for the front entrance steps and for the columns on either side of the main entrance. The columns will now be in one piece instead of three while the plan of the staff approach will be slightly elevated. The additional of the Bedford stone will be $378, raising the entire contract price of the building to $15,437.
Monitor Press
9-15-1915

Library Plans Changed.

Certain minor changes have been made in the plans of the new Carnegie library, which involve the use of Bedford stone instead of concrete for the front entrance steps and for the two columns on either side of the main entrance. The columns will now be in one piece instead of three, while the plan of the stairway approach will be slightly altered. The additional cost of the Bedford stone will be $378, raising the entire contract price of the building to $15,437.

Wellington Public Library
28 June 1916; Col 6
Wellington Daily News

Wellington Public Library

The public library building was turned over to the city Monday by the contractor, Mr. Mitchell, and accepted by the Carnegie board of trustees. The week of cleaning and assembling books has begun. It is hoped that by Saturday the library may be opened for the circulation of books. The formal opening and dedication will take place in the early fall.

A file of bound periodicals, through the use of the Reader’s Guide to Periodicals and the older index known as Poole's, is one of the most important reference tools in a general library. The fewer the books in any library the more Important become the magazines as a source of information. A newly organized library must necessarily depend to a large extent upon its own community to supply the volumes of the magazines which were issued previous to the organization. The Wellington Public library must have such a file of magazines, and volumes, bound or unbound issued since 1900 of inestimable value. Such magazines as Atlantic Monthly, Century Form, Harper’s monthly, Independent, Outlook, Review of reviews. North American review, Popular science monthly, Scientific American, National Geographic magazine, St. Nicholas, Scribners and World's work would be highly appreciated. Will persons having magazines for disposal please notify the librarian, Miss Flower, telephone 404W.

Wellington Public Library
28 June 1916; Col 6
Wellington Daily News

Wellington Public Library

The public library building was turned over to the city Monday by the contractor, Mr. Mitchell, and accepted by the Carnegie board of trustees. The week of cleaning and assembling books has begun. It is hoped that by Saturday the library may be opened for the circulation of books. The formal opening and dedication will take place in the early fall.

A file of bound periodicals, through the use of the Reader’s Guide to Periodicals and the older index known as Poole's, is one of the most important reference tools in a general library. The fewer the books in any library the more Important become the magazines as a source of information. A newly organized library must necessarily depend to a large extent upon its own community to supply the volumes of the magazines which were issued previous to the organization. The Wellington Public library must have such a file of magazines, and volumes, bound or unbound issued since 1900 of inestimable value. Such magazines as Atlantic Monthly, Century Form, Harper’s monthly, Independent, Outlook, Review of reviews. North American review, Popular science monthly, Scientific American, National Geographic magazine, St. Nicholas, Scribners and World's work would be highly appreciated. Will persons having magazines for disposal please notify the librarian, Miss Flower, telephone 404W.

New Library Open

The Carnegie Library was open this afternoon to issue books. The old library in the city has been moved to the new building and books were issued as is customary on Saturday afternoon. The collection has been somewhat increased by a donation from a former Wellington man who does not wish his name disclosed as yet.

The tables and steel book racks have arrived but the chairs and some other equipment will not be here until next week. The furniture is of fumed oak and is decidedly handsome.

Miss Flower and Miss Hackney are at present engaged in classifying the books on hand and repairing the torn volumes. The order for the new books will soon be placed. When the library is fully equipped a reception will be held in the building.

The library will be open from nine in the morning till nine in the evening and from two till six Sunday afternoons. Ail libraries observe legal holidays and remain closed all day.
New Library Open

The Carnegie Library was open this afternoon to issue books. The old library in the city has been moved to the new building and books were issued as is customary on Saturday afternoon. The collection has been somewhat increased by a donation from a former Wellington man who does not wish his name disclosed as yet.

The tables and steel book racks have arrived but the chairs and some other equipment will not be here until next week. The furniture is of fumed oak and is decidedly handsome.

Miss Flower and Miss Hackney are at present engaged in classifying the books on hand and repairing the torn volumes. The order for the new books will soon be placed. When the library is fully equipped a reception will be held in the building.

The library will be open from nine in the morning till nine in the evening and from two till six Sunday afternoons. Ail libraries observe legal holidays and remain closed all day.
CARNEGIE LIBRARY CONTRACT LET

J. H. Mitchell & Son, of this City, the Successful Bidders, and Within the Limit of Cost.

The firm of J. H. Mitchell & Son, which has already erected many of the most important structures of the city, including the Antlers hotel, the new Methodist church, the Hatcher hospital, etc., have been awarded the contract to build the new Carnegie library at this place, their bid being the lowest of seven submitted. There was of course, no question about the financial responsibility of the firm or their ability to properly fulfill the contract, so the board had no hesitation in placing it in their hands. The following firms and individuals submitted bids:

Parker, of Wichita, $18,045.
Winger, of Wellington, $18,450.
Borden, of Wichita, $17,950
Deter & Winzell, of Wichita
and Joplin, $17,042.
Harrington, of Wichita, $18,526
Hammond, of Wichita, $15,200
Mitchell & Son, $15,059.

The plans of the new library were drawn by Architect C. W. Terry of a Wichita. They provide for a building with exterior walls of motted gray brick and roof of red Spanish tile, Bedford limestone was finally chosen for the foundation walls and exterior trimmings, though bids were submitted for the use of either that or Carthage stone. Terra cotta will be used for the ornamental work over the front entrance and above the caps of the windows. The front steps will be of reinforced concrete, though Bedford stone may be substituted.

The grade line of the building is to be 18 inches above the present grade. There is to be excavation under the entire building, and the dirt from this is to be used in grading up the site. The foundation and footings are to be of concrete up to the grade line and from there to the water table of Bedford stone. The basement, which is to extend under the entire building, is to have a five-inch cement floor and six-inch cement base-board all around the basement floor.

Besides a boiler room, janitor's room, work room, toilets and lavatories for men and women and a room for the use of the library staff, the basement will contain a spacious lecture room, taking up the entire west half of its space and equipped with platform and other accessories.

The library room on the main floor will be practically one large room. It's various divisions separated merely by book-case partitions. The floor will be one large cement slab, laid on steel beams, the cement reinforced by iron rods bending over the beams. The floor covering will be a cork carpet cemented to the concrete, with a colored cement border.
The interior finish will be of red oak. The vestibule will have a tiled floor and an eight-inch marble base. Two large square columns in the center of the room will also be finished in marble.

The delivery desk will face the front entrance. On either side from the entrance as far as the desk will be low book-cases of oak for reference works or books in general use. The
stack room will be at the rear, where the main collection will be kept in double metal book-cases arranged at right angles to the rear wall. The space at the left of the entrance has been designated as the adults’ reading room; that on the right as the childrens' reading room. At the rear of the adults’ room will be the reference room, while in the corresponding space on the other side the librarian will have her private office. There
will be an interior stairway of iron and concrete and with an ornamental balustrade leading from the first floor to the basement. The walls of the library will be hard finished, with an oak picture molding clear around the room and an ornate plaster cornice at the ceiling. The decorations and lighting fixtures are not included in the present contract, but it is presumed that the system of indirect lighting will be employed.

The exterior of down-spouts will be of copper. The
roof, which will be of the truss pattern, will be covered with red Spanish tile except the flat deck at the top, where the covering will be tin. The heating plant will consist of a 6-32 Empress steam boiler or its equivalent, fitted with Jarvis gas burners. There will be 1,204 square feet of radiators. All electric light wiring will be carried in enameled iron conduits and metal lath will be used throughout the building. The library will be practically fireproof, haring scarcely any wood outside the interior finish and the bookcases in its construction.

The specifications designate first-class material and thorough workmanship throughout, subject to careful inspection and supervision. It will be a building of which Wellington may be proud, convenient in arrangement, of pleasing architecture and substantial construction. After the town has enjoyed the advantages of a good Carnegie library for a year or two people will be wondering how they ever got along without one.

Faith and Apples.

Speaking of faith: It was faith that caused Ralph Dixon, living near Arkansas City, some twelve years ago to plant sixty acres of orchard which this year will produce fifteen thousand bushels of apples. It was faith that caused Carl Young, near Oxford, ten years ago to plant twenty acres of orchard that this year will produce five thousand bushels of apples. It was faith that caused John Alter, near Belle Plaine, eighteen years ago to plant 240 acres of orchard, from which he will gather forty thousand bushels of apples this year.

Once these apples were in seed form; the little seed had a tree in it, and these people who happened to own land on the Arkansas river, saw that if they would put this little seed in the earth, and then wait for God’s sunshine and rain, and subsequently irrigation by Mr. Alter, that they would get their reward. To-day these people have good fortunes as a result of their faith. A great many of their neighbors lacked faith and to-day lack revenue.

Many a person now living in the Arkansas river valley and seeing these very same things will still lack faith, but some fellows, who are reading the report of the secretary of the state board of horticulture on the Arkansas river valley which he has recently published, setting out that it is the great fruit section of Kansas, living perhaps in New York or California, will come here and plant these little trees and wait seven or eight years, having faith in the future of the trees and faith in the future of the country and the market for apples, and they too, will get a reward for possessing faith.

“Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen.”—P. H. Albright in Winfield Courier.

Sumner County Snaps.

160 acres; 80 acres choice bottom, nev fails for corn; 120 acres in cultivation, 40 acres In pasture, 15 acres alfalfa; improved, near good town; $600.00 fine corn goes to purchaser and possession at once. No better bargain in Kansas. Mortgage $3,000.00 at 6 per cent Price $7,000.00.
BLACK & MARTIN,
Wellington, Kansas

Biliousness and Constipation.
It is certainly surprising that any woman will endure the miserable feelings caused by biliousness and constipation, when relief is so easily had and at so little expense. Mrs. Chas. Peck, Gates, N. Y., writes: “About a year ago I used two bottles of Charmberlain’s Tablets and they cured me of biliousness and constipation. Obtainable everywhere.

Mr. and Mrs. K. M. Barber and two
children, of Wichita, are visiting their relative, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Green, for a few days.
The Monitor-Press
Wellington, KS
15 Sept 1915
Page 6
Wellington, Kansas
Top.........................City Library
Center........................City Hall
Bottom.....................Post Office
Our Municipal Buildings
These buildings are all centrally located and are of unique construction.
Few cities pride themselves on better municipal buildings than Wellington.

The City of Homes
Top.....................Senior High School
Center................. Junior High School
Bottom..................First Ward School
Facts About Our Schools
Wellington uses six large school buildings, besides rooms in the Library and annex rooms to Junior High. The Senior High School is a standard accredited school, ranking high among the high schools of the state. The school facilities of Wellington are most attractive.
Wellington Daily News November 16, 1934
HISTORY Of LIBRARY

A history of the various phases connected with the starting of the library in this city which is now known as the Wellington City Library, has been compiled by Mrs. Berthe Showalter VanVoorhees, who has spent much time looking over files and early day reports in order to make the report as complete as possible.
The result of her work is as follows:
Our public library is one of our institutions of which we may all
be proud. The rows upon rows of books and the quiet atmosphere per-vading the room invite one to join the groups sitting at the tables,
and to read to one's heart's content. Do you like history, biography, or drama? Would you prefer a book of modern verse or one of the late novels? Perhaps you would like to look up some references, read a current magazine, or take advantage of the newspaper clipping bureau.
Whatever type of reading you prefer, it is yours for the asking. At all time you may have the help and advise of the efficient librarian,
Mrs. Ruth Hepler, and of her two able assistants, Mrs. Nona Dey,
and Miss Peggy Daugherly.
Our library contains 16,800 volumes and the circulation for the past year was 77,888 books. This number does not include the
pictures and newspaper clippings that were checked out. Mrs Hepler
says that this is a remarkable record for a city of this size.
A vote of thanks should be given to all who have served as members
of the Library Board. Their untiring efforts have helped to make this
institution a success. The members of the present Board are: Mrs. E. T
Hackney, Mr. E. M. Carr, Mr. A. A. Belsley, Mr. Charles F. Martin and Mrs. George Elsass.
Mrs. Hackney has served continuously on the Board for over twenty years.
We are now inviting all our readers to return with us to the 1880's and 90's, when Wellington had no public library.
Of course, we had a school library with a limited number of books that were recommended for the children
of that period. There were the Elsie Dinsmore books, which the girls all loved to read. If they be-
came a trifle warped before they were worn out, it was because her
youthful readers mingled their tears with hers as they read of her sad experiences. It has been estimated with a fair degree of accuracy that she shed seven gallons, three and a half quarts thruout the thirty-three volumes.

There were the Frank books, the Flaxie Frizzle Series and the Five
Little Peppers. The works of Alcott, Burnett, and Eggleston were there if you were fortunate enough to find them in. One boy, seeking some-
thing exciting, asked the librarian for "The Circuit Rider," but he left in disgust when he was told that "The Circuit Rider was a story of a preacher.
Magazines and newspapers were not so plentiful as they are today.
Of the former, "The Youth's Companion," "Munsey's," "Leslie's, and
"The Century" were among the accepted ones. The "Diamond Dick" thrill- ers were more popular with young boys and many a copy was secretly read in the dim light of the old barn loft.
Occasionally, the lurid sheets of the "police Gazette" were smugg- led into even the more respectable homes. Even at the risk of corrupt- ing our morals, we would like to see one of those papers again. If

our memory has not failed us, compared to the pictures of bathing beauty contests and to the advertising sections of our present day newspapers and magazines, the "Police Gazette" would pass for a Sunday School paper. And yet, it was considered very risque.
Book-loving parents at a great sacrifice purchased for their libraries the works of Shakespeare, Thackeray, Scott and Eliot. These came in sets and were almost invariably expensive books, beautifully embossed in gilt, and printed in type so fine as to be almost illegible. When the books in the school library were consumed or outgrown, there was nothing for the young reader to do but to turn to the family book shelves. We read and learned to love many of the old classics even at the expense of our eyesight.

In 1895, a great impetus was given to the library movement here, when Mrs. Kate Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson, and Mr. W. E. Schulte sponsored a reading room and library for the young men and women of the community. It was first held over the Harvey Coverdale's Clothing store on South Washington and was later moved to the building south of the Antlers Hotel.
,
Public spirited citizens donated furniture, books and money to the cause and the young people's societies of the different churches assumed the responsibilities of providing the librarians or custodians.

Each society took its turn week about and twice a week served refreshments for which a nominal sum was charged.

The rooms were open every evening until late and for about four years this arrangement furnished a place for the young people to read and play wholesome games, thus keeping them off the street.

In the fall of 1899, Mrs. Noble Prentis, for whom the Prentis Study Club was named, paid a visit to the young women. At her suggestion, this club of twenty members decided to start a public library for the Wellington community, so, on the following New Year's Day, they held open house to the men of the town at the home of F. K. Robbins, whose daughter, Miss Edna, was a charter member of the club. Each gentleman was requested to bring a book in place of the customary card. In this way about two hundred books were obtained.

Harry Buttrey kindly offered to the club the use of a few shelves in the rear of his store and the Wellington Public Library was launched. It was open only on Saturday afternoons, the different members of the Prentis Club serving as librarian. Miss Maude Barrett was later elected librarian and served in that capacity for two years. More books were added from time to time. Some were donated by friends of the library; but most of them were purchased by the club with money earned by means of markets, fairs, and the like and a portion of the annual dues also was set aside for the library fund.

In March, 1907, the executive committee of the Lecture Course turned over their entire season's profits, $340.48, to the Prentis Club for its library fund in consideration of the assistance rendered by the young women in the sale of season tickets.

The new city building was nearing completion and the women of the Federation had been promised two rooms, a library and a social room, providing they would agree to furnish them. The Prentis Club, realizing that Wellington deserved a larger and better equipped library that they could maintain, took the matter up with the Federation of Women's Clubs who, in turn, requested Mayor T. A. Hubbard to call a meeting for the purpose of establishing a permanent city library.

The meeting was called in February, 1908, with Mayor Hubbard in the chair and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. Various plans for equipping and maintaining a library were discussed. The Federation women offered
$1200 for the furnishing and purchasing of books. The Prentis Club members stated that they would turn over their books and their library fund of $250.

It was finally decided to leave the formulation of a plan to a committee of twenty members, to be appointed by the mayor, who were to meet and recommend some method by which the library might be started by the time the new quarters in the city building would be ready for occupancy.

Following instructions the committe met in the Commercial Rooms in March, 1908, with Mrs. G. E. Hitchcock presiding and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. It was voted to organize a Wellington Library Association to be incorporated under the state laws relating to public libraries, to establish and maintain a free public library in the city of Wellington. The capital stock was to be $5000 at $1 per share. Ed. T. Hackney was appointed chairman of a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and constitution and by-laws.
Another meeting was called by Mayor T. A. Hubbard in June 1908, to all persons interested in the establishment of the public library.

It was voted to incorporate according to recommendations of the committee of twenty. It was voted to call the library the Prentis Library as a token of their appreciation for the services of the Prentis Club members thru a period of more than eight years.

The following people were elected as directors for the first year: Messrs. F. E. Carr, W. H. Maddy, W. M. Massey, E. T. Hackney, A. A. Belsley, W. H. Schulte, Chas. Hunter, W. C. McCroskey, O. W. Julian, H. W. Herrick, and H. L. Woods; Mesdames J. T. Herrick, Ed. T. Hackney, Chas. Havens, R. W. Hitchcock; and Misses Maude A. Price, Ida V. Hoge, Katherine Luening and Myrtle Nelson.

The city building was accepted by the Mayor and council August 3, 1906, and on September 8, the room in the southeast corner of the second floor was turned over to the Federated women for their library. The ladies of the W.C.T.U. donated a small collection of books, which, with the gift from the Federation and the Prentis Club made quite a creditable beginning. A portion of the money given by the Federation was used for furniture and the rest for the purchase of reference books. The Prentis lib-rary, being a circulating library, included practically all fiction books.

Rev. S. E. Busser, superintendent of reading rooms along the Santa Fe system, offered the use of $500 worth of books, the only provisions being that the Santa Fe employees be permitted the use of the room and that the company reserve the right to reserve the books whenever they desired to do so. The offer was accepted. Miss Katherine Hackney was elected librarian and kept the library open every Saturday afternoon. The fines paid by patrons for over due books constituted the librarian's salary.

On May 16, 1914. was held the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board appointed by Mayor Geo. H. Hunter. The purpose of the board was to discuss ways and means to erect a city library building. Mr. Hunter was president of the board, Mr. M. C. Burton was vice president; Mrs. Ellen R. Clayton, secretary; and E. B. Roser, treasurer. Other members were Mrs. E. T. Eackaey, Mrs.W. H. Maddy, Mr. H. L. Buttrey, Miss Maude A. Price, and Mr. W. H. Burks. A committee was appointed to investigate possible building sites for a library building.

On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy the present site of the Long Bell Lumber Company for $3,500. They then began to negotiate for a Carnegie Endowment and in December of the same year the Carnegie Corporation agreed to give the city $17,500, providing the city would spend ten percent of above sum each year in the maintenance of the library.
On June 19, 1916, the Board accepted the building from J. H. Mitchell, contractor. Miss Gretchen Flower was elected to organize the library and to serve as its first librarian, and Miss Katherine Hackney was her assistant. The Prentis library was turned over to the Carnegie Library Board as a nucleus for the new library and the Wellington library Association ceased to function.

Each succeeding year the Wellington Public library has grown bigger and better and its circulation has increased.

Much time and effort have been consumed in the accumulation of the above facts and many local citizens have assisted in completing this record. If anyone, by reading this unpretentious history, has been inspired to a greater appreciation of the fine modern library or to a deeper gratitude toward the loyal citizens who have made it possible, then this article will have served its purpose.

Friday, November 16, 1934.
HISTORY OF LIBRARY
A history of the various phases connected with the starting of the library in this city which is now known as the Wellington City Library, has been compiled by Mrs. Berthe Showalter VanVoorhees, who has spent much time looking over files and early day reports in order to make the report as complete as possible.

The result of her work is as follows:
Our public library is one of our institutions of which we may all be proud. The rows upon rows of books and the quiet atmosphere pervading the room invite one to join the groups sitting at the tables and to read to one's heart's content. Do you like history, biography, or drama? Would you prefer a book of modern verse or one of the late novels? Perhaps you would like to look up some references, read a current magazine, or take advantage of the newspaper clipping bureau. Whatever type of reading you prefer, it is yours for the asking. At all time you may have the help and advice of the efficient librarian, Miss Florence Williams, and of her two able assistants, Mrs. Nona Dey and Miss Catharine Dyerman.

Our library contains 13,500 volumes and the circulation for the past year was 100,000 books. This number does not include the magazines and newspaper clippings that were checked out. Miss Williams says that this is a remarkable record for a city of this size.
A vote of thanks should be given to all who have served as members of the Library Board. Their untiring efforts have helped to make this institution a success. The members of the present Board are: Mrs. E. T. Hackney, Mr. W. H. Burks, Mrs. John Felt, Mrs. E. M. Carr, Mr. A. A. Belsley, Mr. Charles F. Martin, Mr. C. L. Haslet, Mr. Grady Booker, and Mrs. George Elsass. Mrs. Hackney and Mr. Burks have served continuously on the Board for over twenty years.

We are now inviting all our readers to return with us to the 1880's and 90's when Wellington had no public library.

Of course, we had a school library with a limited number of books that were recommended for the children of that period. There were the Elsie Dinsmore books, which the girls all loved to read.
If they became a trifle warped before they were worn out, it
was because her youthful readers mmgled their tears with hers as they read of her sad experiences It has been estimated with a fail degree of accuracy that she shed seven gallons, three and a hall quarts thruout the thirty-three volumes.
There were the Frank books, the Flaxie Frizzle Series and the) Five Little Peppers. The works of Alcott, Burnett, and Eggleston were there if you were fortunate enough to find them in. One boy, seeking something exciting, asked
the librarian for “The Circus Rider," but he left in disgust when he was told that “The Cir- cuit Rider" was the story of a preacher.
Magazines and newspapers were not so plentiful as they are today. Of the former, “The r Youth's Companion," “Munsey's," “Leslie’s," and “The Century" were among the accepted ones. The “Diamond Dick" thrillers were more popular with young boys and many a copy was secretly read in the dim light of the old barn loft.
Occasionally, the lurid sheets of the “Police Gazette" were smuggled into even the more respectable homes. Even at the risk of corrupting our morals, we would like to see one of those papers again. If our memory has not failed us, compared to the pictures of bathing beauty contests and to the advertising sections of our present day newspapers and
magazines, the “Police Gazette" would pass for a Sunday School paper. And yet it was considered very risque.
Book-loving parents at a great sacrifice purchased for their libraries the works of Shakespeare, Dickens, Thackeray, Scott, and Eliot. These came in sets and were almost invariably expensive books, beautifully embossed in gilt, and printed in type so fine as to be almost illegible. When the books in the school library were consumed or outgrown, there was nothing for the young reader to do but to turn to the family book shelves. We read and learned to love many of the old classics even at the expense of our eyesight.
In 1895, a great impetus was given to the library movement here when Mrs. Kate Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz Whitson, and Mr. W. H. Schulte sponsored a readings room and library for the young men and women of the community. It was first held over Harkey Coverdale's clothing store on South Washington and was later moved to the building south of the Antlers Hotel.
Public spirited citizens donated furniture, books and money to the cause and the young people's societies of the different? churches assumed the responsibil-ity of providing the librarians or I custodians. Each society took its turn week about and twice a week served refreshments for which a nominal sum was charged.
The rooms were open every evening until late and for about four years this arrangement furnished a place for the young
people to read and play wholesome games, thus keeping them off the street.
In the fall of 1899, Mrs. Noble Prentis, for whom the Prentis Study Club was named, paid a visit to the young women. At her suggestion, this club of twenty members decided to start a public library for the Wellington j community. So, on the following New Year's Day, they held open house to the men of the town at the home of F. K. Robbins whose daughter, Miss Edna, was a charter member of the club. Each gentleman was requested to bring a book in place of the customary card. In this way about two hun-j dred books were obtained.
Harry Buttrey kindly offered to the club the use of a few shelves in the rear of his store and the Wellington Public Library was launched. It was open only on Saturday afternoons, the different members of the Prentis Club serving as librarian. Miss Maud Barrett was later elected librarian and served in that capacity for two years. More books were added from time to time. Some were donated by friends of the library; but most of them were purchased by the club with money earned by means of markets, fairs, and the like and a por-j tion of the annual dues also was set aside for the library fund.
In March, 1907, the executive committee of the Lecture Course turned over their entire season's j profits, $340.48, to the Prentis Club for its library fund in
consideration of the assistance rendered by the young women in the sale of season tickets.
The new city building was nearing completion and the women of the Federation had been promised two rooms, a library and a social room, providing they would agree to furnish them. The Prentis Club, realizing that Wellington deserved a larger and better equipped library than they could maintain, took the matter up with the Federation of Wo- men's Clubs who, in turn, re- quested Mayor T. A. Hubbard to call a meeting for the purpose of establishing a permanent city library.
The meeting was called in February, 1908, with Mayor Hubbard in the chair and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. Various plans for equipping and maintaining a li brary were discussed. The Federation women offered $1200 for the furnishing and the purchase ‘of books. The Prentis Club members stated that they would turn j over their library of five hundred books and their library fund of $250.
It was finally decided to leave the formulation of a plan to a committee of twenty members, to be appointed by the mayor, who were to meet and recommend
some method by which the library might be started by the time the new quarters in the city building would be ready for occupancy.
Following instructions the com mittee met in the Commercial Rooms in March, 1908, with Mrs C. E. Hitchcock presiding and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. It was voted to organize a Welling ton Library Association to be incorporated under the state laws relating to public libraries to establish and maintain a free public library in the city of Wellington. The capital stock was to be $5000 at $1 per share. Ed T Hackney was appointed chairman of a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and constitution and by-laws.

Another meeting was called by Mayor T. A. Hubbard in June 1908, to all persons interested in the establishment of the public library. It was voted to incorporate according to recommendations of the committee of twenty. It was voted to call the library the Prentis Library as a token ol their appreciation for the services of the Prentis Club members thru a period of more than eight years.

The following people were elected as directors for the first year: Messrs F. E. Carr, W. H. Maddy, W. M . Massey, E. T. Hackney, A. A. Belsley, W. H. Schulte, Chas. Hunter, W. C. Mc-Croskey, O. W. Julian, H. W. Herrick, and H. L. Woods; Mesdames J. T. Herrick, Ed T. Hack-ney, Chas. Havens, R. W. Hitchcock. Geo. T. Pitts, H. L. Cobean, W. G. Moodie, and C. E. Hitchcock; and Misses Maude A. Price, Ida V. Hoge, Katharine Luening and Myrtle Nelson.

The city building was accepted by the Mayor and council Aug. 3, 1908, and on Sept. 8 the room in the southeast corner of the second floor was turned over to the Federated women for their library. The ladies of the W. C. T. U. donated a small collection of books, which, with the gift from the Federation and the Prentis Club made quite a creditable beginning. A portion of the money given by the Federation was used for furniture and the rest for the purchase of reference books. The Prentis library, being a circulating library, included practically all fiction books.
Rev. S. E. Busser, superintendent of reading rooms along the Santa Fe system, offered the use of $500 worth of books, the only provisions being that the Santa Fe employes be permitted the use of the room and that the company reserve the right to re-
serve the books whenever they desired to do so. The offer was accepted.
Miss Katharine Hackney was elected librarian and kept the library open every Saturday afternoon. The fines paid by patrons for over due books constitute the librarian’s salary.
On May 16, 1914, was held the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board appointed by Mayor Geo. H. Hunter. The purpose of the board was to discuss ways and means to erect a city library building. Mr. Hunt was president of the board, M M. C. Burton was vice president Mrs. Ellen R. Clayton secretary and E. B. Roser, treasurer. Other members were Mrs. E. T. Hackney, Mrs. W. H. Maddy, Mr. H. Buttrey, Miss Maude A. Price, and Mr. W. H. Burks. A committee was appointed to investigate possible building sites for a library building.
On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy the present site of the public library from the Long Bell Lumber Company for $3,500. They then began to negotiate for a Carnegie Endowment and in December of the same year the Carnegie Corporation agreed to give the city $17,500, providing the city would spend ten percent of above sum each year in the maintenance of the library. On June 19, 1916, the Board accepted the building from J. H. Mitchell, contractor. Miss Gretchen Flower was elected to organize the library and to serve as its first librarian, and Miss Katharine Hackney was her assistant. The Prentis Library was turned over to the Carnegie Library Board as a nucleus for the new library and the Wellington Library Association ceased to function.
Each succeeding year the Wellington Public Library has grown bigger and better and its circulation has increased.
Much time and effort have been consumed in the accumulation of the above facts and many local citizens have assisted in completing this record. If anyone by reading this unpretentious history, has been inspired to a greater appreciation of the fine modern library or to a deeper gratitude toward the loyal citizens who have made it possible then this article will have served its purpose.
Former Board Members
A vote of thanks should he given to all those who have served as members of the Board of Directors through the years of the growth of our library.

Wellington citizens who have served as members of . the Board of Directors during the twenty five years of the library’s history are:

Mrs. Martin C. Burton, Ellen E. Clayton, Mabel C. Hackney,
Mary E. Maddy, Maude A. Price, Emil B. Roser,
Mrs. H. L. Buttrey, Mr. W. H. Burks,
Mrs. Dee Penniwell, Mr. M. R. McLean,
Mr. Charles P. Martin, Mrs. George Elsass, Mr. E. M. Carr, Mr. A. M. McCullough,
Mr. A. A. Belsley, Mrs. John Felt, Mr. Perry Miller, Mr. Catlin, Mr. C. G. McCormick,
Mr. A. D. Zook, Mr. Grady Booker, Mr. Claude Kissick,
Mrs. W. M. Martin, Mayors : George H. Hunter, Mr. Naylor, J. E. Thralls, C. H. Haslet, C. N. Cooley, W. P. White, C. E. Glamann.

The library’s purpose is to supply
THE RIGHT BOOK TO THE RIGHT PERSON AT THE RIGHT TIME.
How Many Volumes
The Library contains 16,833 books.
There are also in the library a pamphlet file, current newspaper clipping file, and a file of mounted pictures which are available for loan.
Circulation
During the past three years, readers have borrowed from the library more than 234,000 books. The total circulation of books in 1940 was 78,393;
1939, 76,907; and in 1938, 79,048. of these, 145,174 were borrowed by adult readers, and 89,177 by children.

Library Staff
There are 3 library employees working under the direction of Mrs. L. Ruth Hepler, librarian.
Mrs. Nona H. Dey, First Assistant
Miss Peggy Daugherty, Second Assistant

Where the Honey Comes From
The Library is supported by a city tax in the same way as the fire department, the police department and the city parks.

A Good Investment
If readers had each purchased, at an average cost of $l.OO for each book, the books they borrowed from the library in 1940, they would have spent $78,583. What they really paid for this service of education; recreation, said inspiration was $4,704.36.

How You Can Help
By being informed about the library; using your influence when needed to help secure adequate tax support, helping to secure bequests and endowment funds, securing special gifts of magazines and books.
Wellington Public Library
RUTH M. HEPLER, Librarian Wellington, Kansas
In-Service-Institute, Emporia, Kansas June 13, 14, 15, 16, 1944

The first institute for librarians in Kansas was held in Emporia, Kansas June 13 to 16, 1944 at the Kansas State Teachers College and was sponsored jointly by K.S.T.C. and the Kansas Library Association.

The theme of the institute, "Discharging the Debt”, from the quotation of Bacon, "l hold every man a debtor to his profession, from the which as men of course do seek to receive countenance and profit, so ought they of duty to endeavor themselves by way of amends, to be a help and ornament thereunto.”

The registration of the institute reached 97 before adjournment.

The two national experts in the library field who were the speakers for the institute were:
Mss Louise Marion Moshier, Senior Library Supervisor of Public Libraries, Division of Adult Education and Library Extension, N.Y.

State Education Department, who is an authority in the field of public library administration. Graduate of Simmons College of Library Science in Boston; Miss Moshier holds the M. A. degree from Columbia University.

As Library Supervisor, Mss Moshier consults with and advises library boards and librarians on problems of organization and administration.

Mss Nora Beust, Senior Specialist in Library Materials, Library Service Division of the U. S. Office of Education, and is widely experienced with children’s work and young people. She is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin Library School, has the M. A. degree from the U. of North Carolina and has had graduate work at the Western Reserve University and the University of Chicago. Miss Beust is the author of
"500 books for children" and "Professional Library Education", both published by the U. S. Office of Education.

Miss Evelyn Elliott, Professor of Library Science, presided as program chairman during the institute and she urged us to replenish our intellect, quoting from Shakespeare;
"Sir he hath never fed of the dainties that are bred in a book; he hath not eat paper, as it were; he hath not drunk ink; his intellect is not replenished."

Other speakers who appeared on the program were: Robert N. Bush, Dean of K. S.T.C. who addressed the institute on "The Library as an educational force in the community." President James F. Price, K.S.T.C., spoke on "Kansas Resources".

The K. L. A. Executive Board voted to recommend to the Kansas Library Association membership at large that the association sponsor the institute of 1945 in cooperation with KSTC Library Staff and the Kellogg Library School Staff.
The meeting adjourned Friday afternoon after the summary of the discussions by Mss Moshier and Mss Beust.

Ruth M. Hepler.
The Wellington Public Library is located at 120 West Seventh and contains 17,868 volumes, 35,000 clippings, 5,000 mounted pictures, and a complete reference section and pamphlet file. If you wish to read history, drama, fiction, travel, or biography, you may ask the librarians for the material. The Public Library is one of our institutions of which we may all be proud. The library has patrons throughout Sumner County, the adjoining counties, as well as serving the city of Wellington.
Above is a view of the main charging desk at the Wellington public library as the librarian, Mrs. Ruth M. Hepler is charging books to Verna Fae Kingsley, daughter of C. F. Kingsley of Perth, and Donald Campbell, son of J. A. Campbell of Wellington.
November 1, 1941
History of the Wellington Public Library

Our Public Library is one of our institutions of which we may all be proud. The quiet atmosphere pervading the rooms invites one to join the groups sitting at the tables and to read to one’s heart's content. Do you enjoy reading biography-, history or drama? Would you prefer a book of modern verse or one of the latest novels? Perhaps you would like to look up material for your club paper or just read a current magazine, or take advantage of the newspaper clipping file. Whatever type of reading you prefer, it is yours for the asking. At all times you may have the help and advise of the librarian, Mrs. L. Ruth Hepler and of her two able assistants, Mrs. Nona H.
Dey and Miss Poggy Daugherty. Mrs. Della Tolles

Our library contains 16, 833 volumes, a useful pamphlet collection, a very
complete clipping file, and a fine picture collection. The circulation for 1940 was 78,393 volumes, 1,736 clippings, 74 pictures and 11 maps. Mrs.
L. Ruth Hepler, says that this is a fine record for a city this size.

A vote of thanks should be given to all those who have served as members of the Board of Directors through the years of the growth of our library.
Mayor George H. Hunter Mrs. M.C. Burton Mrs. Ellen R. Clayton Mrs. E.B. Roser Mrs. E.T. Hackney Mrs. W.H. Maddy Mrs. H.L. Buttrey Miss Maude A. Price Mr. W.H. Burks Mrs. Lee Penniwell Mr. M.R. McLean Mr. Charles F. Martin Mrs. Geroge Elsass Mr. E.M. Carr Mr. A.M. McCullough Mr. A. A. Belsley Mrs. John Felt Mr. Perry Miller
Mr. Catlin Mr. C. G. McCormisk Mr. A. D. Zook Mr. Grady Booker Mr. Claude Kissick Mrs. W. M. Martin Mayor Naylor Mayor J. M. Thralls Mayor C. H. Haslet Mayor C. N. Cooley Mayor W. P. White Mayor C. E. Glamann

Their untiring efforts have helped to make this institution a success. The members of the present Board are:
Mayor C.E. Glamann Mrs. E.T. Hackney Mr. Amos A. Belsley Mrs. George Elsass Mr. E. M. Carr Mr. C. P. Martin Mrs. P. A. Brooke Mr. Claude Kissick Mrs. W. M. Martin
Mrs. E. T. Hackney has served continuously on the Board since the Library was organized.

We are now inviting our readers to return with us to the 1880’s and 90’s when Wellington had no public library. In 1895, a great impetus was given to the library movement here, when Mrs. Kate Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson and Mr. W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and library for the young men and women of the community. It was first held over Harvey Coverdale's Clothing store on South Washington and was later moved to the building south of the Antlers hotel.
Public spirited citizens donated furniture, books and money to the cause and the young people’s societies of the different churches assumed the responsibilities of providing the librarians or custodians. Each society took its turn week about and twice a week served refreshments for which a nominal sum was charged.
The rooms were open every evening until late and for about four years this arrangement furnished a place for the young people to read and play wholesome games, thus keeping them off the street.

In the fall of 1899, Mrs. Noble Prentis, for whom the Prentis Study Club was named, paid avisit to the young women. At her suggestion, this club of twenty members decided to start a public library for the Wellington community. So, on the following New Year’s Day, they held open house to the men of the town at the home of F. K. Robbins, whose daughter, Miss Edna, was a charter member of the club. Each gentleman was requested to bring a book in place of the customary card. In this way about two hundred books were obtained.

Harry Buttrey kindly offered to the club the use of a few shelves in the rear of this storeand the Wellington Public Library was launched. It was open only on Saturday afternoons, the different members of the Prentis Club serving as librarian. Kiss Maude Barrett was later elected librarian and served in that capacity for two years. More books were added from time to time. Some were donated by friends of the library but most of them were purchased by the club with money earned by means of markets, fairs, and the like and a portion of the annual dues also was set aside for the library fund.

In March, 1907, the executive committee of the Lecture Course turned over their entire season’s profits, $340.48, to the Prentis Club for its library fund in consideration of the assistance rendered by the young women in the sale of season tickets.

The new city building was nearing completion and the women of the Federation had been promised two rooms, a library and a social room, providing they would agree to furnish them. The Prentis Club, realizing that Wellington deserved a larger and better equipped library than they could maintain, took the matter up with the Federation of Women’s Clubs who, in turn, requested the Mayor T. A. Hubbard to call a meeting for the purpose of establishing a permanent city library.

The meeting was called in February, 1908, with mayor Hubbard in the chair and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. Various plans for equipping and maintaining a library were discussed. The Federation Women offered $1200.00 for the furnishing and purchasing of books. The Prentis Club members stated that they would turnover their books and their library fund of $250.00.

It was finally decided to leave the firmulation of a plan to a committee of twenty members, to be appointed by the mayor, who were to meet and recommend some method by which the library might be started by the time the new quarters in the city building would be ready for occupancy.

Following instructions the committee met in the Commercial Rooms in March, 1908, with Mrs. C. E. Hitchcock presiding and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. It was voted to organize a Wellington Library Association to be incorporated under the state laws relating to public libraries, to establish and maintain a free public library in the city of Wellington. The capital stock was to be $5000.00 at $1.00 per share. Ed. T. Hackney was appointed chairman of a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and constitution and by-laws.
3.
Another meeting was called, by Mayor T. A. Hubbard in June 1908, to all persons interested in the establishment of a public library. It was voted to incorporate according to recommendations of the committee of twenty. It was voted to call the library the Prentis Library as a token of their appreciation for the years of services of the Prentis Club members thru a period of more than eight years.

The following people were elected as directors for the first year: Messr F. E. Carr, W. H. Maddy, W. M. Massey, E. T. Hackney, A. A. Belsley, W. H. Schulte, Charles Hunter, W. C. McCroskey, O. W. Julian, H. W. Herrick, and H. L. Woods; Mesdames J. R. Herrick, Ed. E. Hackney, Charles Havens, R. W. Hitchcock; and Miss Maude A. Price, Ida V. Hoge, Katherine Luening and Myrtle Nelson.

The city building was accepted by the mayor and the council August 3,
1908, and on September 8, the room in the southeast corner of the second floor was turned over to the Federated women for their library. The ladies of the W.C.T.U. donated a small collection of books, which, with the gift from the Federation and Prentis Club made quite a creditable beginning. A portion of the money given by the Federation was used for furniture and the rest for the purchase of reference books. The Prentis library, being circulation library, included practically all fiction books.

Rev. S. E. Busser, superintendent of reading rooms along the Santa Fe system, offered the use of $500.00 worth of books, the only provision being that the Santa Fe employees be permitted the use of the room and that the the company reserve the right to reserve the books whenever they desired to do so. The offer was accepted. Miss Katherine Hackney was elected librarian and kept the library open every Saturday afternoon. The fines paid by the patrons for over due books constituted the librarian's salary.

On May 16, 1914, was held the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board appointed by Mayor George H. Hunter. The purpose of the board was to discuss ways and means to erect a city library building. Mr. Hunter was president of the board, Mr. M. C. Burton was vice president; Mrs. Ellen Clayton, secretary, and E. B. Roser, treasurer. Other members were: Mrs. E. T. Hackney, Mrs. W. H. Maddy, Mr. H. L. Buttrey, Miss Maude A. Price, and Mr. W. H. Burks. A committee was appointed to investigate possible building sites for the library building.

On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy the present site form the Long Bell Lumber Company for $3,500.00 They then began to negotiate for a Carnegie Endowment and in December of the same year the Carnegie Corporation agreed to give the city,

$17,500.00 providing the city would spend ten percent of the above amount each year in the maintenance of the Library On June 19, 1916, the Board of Directors accepted the building from J. H. Mitchell, contractor. Miss Gretchen Flower was elected to organize the Library and to serve as its first librarian, and Miss Katherine Hackney was her assistant. The Prentis Library was turned over to the Carnegie Library Board as a nucleus for the
new library and Wellington Library ceased to function.

Each succeeding year the Wellington Public Library has grown bigger and better and its circulation has increased.

Much time and effort has been consumed in the accumulation of the above facts, and many local citizens have assisted in completing this record.

If anyone, by reading this unpretentious history has been inspired to a greater appreciation of the fine modern library or to a deeper gratitude toward the loyal citizens who have made it possible, then this history will have served its purpose.

L. Ruth Hepler, Librarian.
November 1, 1941
The History Of The
Wellington Library
By L. Ruth Hepler

In Two Parts—Part I

Our Public Library is one of our institutions of which we may all be proud. The quiet atmos- sphere pervading the rooms in vites one to join the groups sit ting at the tables, and to read to ones heart’s content. Do you enjoy reading biography, history, or drama? Perhaps you would like to look up material for you club paper or read a current mag- azine, or take advantage of the newspaper clipping file. Whatever type, of reading you prefer, it is yours for the asking. At all times you may have the help and advice of the librarian, Mrs. L. Ruth Hepler, and her two able assistants, Mrs. Nona H. Dey and:Mrs. Della Tolles.

At present our library contains 17,176 volumes; a useful pamphlet collection, a very com- plete clipping file and a fine pic-lure collection. The circulation for this year (1942) to date is 77,732 volumes; 1,514 clippings; 336 pictures; and 3 maps.

“A vote of thanks should be given to all those who have served as members of the Board of Directors through the years of the growth of the library. Their tiring efforts have helped to make this institution a success. These men and women have served: Mayor George H. Hunter Mrs. M. C. Burton; Mrs. Ellen R. Clayton; Mrs. E. B. Roser; Mrs. E. T Hackney; Mrs. W. H. Maddy; Mrs. H. L. Buttrey; Miss Maude A. Price; Mr. W. H. Burks; Mrs. Lee Peniwell; Mr. M. R. McLean; Mrs. Charles F. Martin; Mrs. George F. Elsass; Mr. E. M. Carr; Mr. A. M. Mc- Cullough; Mr. A. A. Belsley; Mrs. John Felt; Perry E. Miller; Mr. A. D. Catlin; Mr. C. G. McCormick; Mr. A. D. Zook; Mr. Grady Booker; Mr Claude Kissick; Mrs. W. M. Martin; Mayor E. P. Naylor; Mayor J. M. Thralls; Mayor C. H. Haslett; Mayor W. N. Cooley; Mayor W. P. White and Mayor C. E. Glamann, The present Board of Directors:
Mayor C E. Glamann; Mrs. E. T. Hackney; Mrs. Amos A. Belsley; Mrs. George F. Elsass; Mr. E. M. Carr; Mr. C. F. Martin; Mrs. F. A.Brooke; Mr. Claude Kissick; Mrs. W. M. Martin.
Mrs. E. T. Hackney has served continuously on the board since
the library was organized.

W. M. Martin; Mayor E. P. Nayy- lor; Mayor J. M. Thralls; Mayor C. H. Haslett; Mayor W. N. Cooley; Mayor W. P. White and Mayor C. E. Glamann.
The present Board of Directors: Mayor C E. Glamann; Mrs. E. T. Hackney; Mrs. Amos A. Belsley; Mrs. George F. Elsass; Mr. E. M. Carr; Mr. C. F. Martin; Mrs. F. A. Brooke; Mr. Claude Kissick; Mrs. W. M. Mar!tin.

Mrs. E. T. Hackney has served continuously on the board since the library was organized.
We are now inviting our read-ers to return with us to the 1880’s and 1890's when Welling-ton had no public library. In 1895 a great impetus was given to the library movement here when Mrs. Kate Sniggs, Mrs.Lulu Frantz - Whitson, and Mr. W. H. Shulte sponsored a reading room and library for young men and women of the community. It was first held over Harvey Coverdale’s Clothing Store on South Washington and was later moved to the building, south of the Antlers Hotel. Public-spirited citizens donated furniture, books, and money to the cause, and the young people’s societies of the different churches assumed the responsibilities of providing the librarians or custodians. Each society took its turn week about and twice a week served refreshments for which a nominal sum was charged.
“The rooms were open every evening until late and for about four years this arrangement fur-mished a place for young people to read and play wholesome games, thus keeping them off the streets.

“In the fall of 1899, Mrs. Noble Prentis, for whom the Prentis Study Club was named, paid a visit to the young women. At her suggestion, this club of twenty members decided to start a public library for the Wellington community. So, on the following New Year’s Day, they held open house to the men of the town at the home of F. K. Robbins, whose daughter, Miss Edna, was a charter member of the club. Each gentleman was requested to bring a book in place of the customary card. In this way about two hundred books were obtained.

“Harry Buttrey kindly offered to the club the use of a few shelves in the rear of his store, and the Wellington Public Library was launched. It was open only on Saturday afternoons, the different members of the Prentis club serving as librarians. Miss Maude Barrett was later elected librarian and served in that ca-paaciiy for two years. More books were added from time to time. Some were donated by friends of the library; but most of them were purchased by the club with money earned by means of mar- kets, fairs, and the like; and a portion of the annual dues also was set aside for the library fund, (To be continued)
A History Of The Wellington Library
In Two Parts Part Two
W.D.N ____________11-30-42
By L. Ruth Hepler

“In March, 1907, the executive committee of the Lecture Course turned over its entire season’s profits, $340.48 to the Prentis Club for its library fund, in the consideration of the assistance rendered by the young women in the sale of season tickets.

“The new city building was nearing completion and the women of the federation had been promised two rooms, a library and a social room, provided they would agree to furnish them; The Prentis Club, realizing that Wellington deserved a larger and better equipped library than they could maintain, took up the matter with the Federation of Women’s Clubs, who, in turn, requested the Mayer T. A. Hubbard to call a meeting for the purpose of establishing a permanent city library.

“The meeting was called in February 1908, with Mayor Hubbard in the chair and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. Various plans for equipping and maintaining a library were discussed. The Federation Women offered $1200.00 for the furnishing and purchasing of books. The Prentis Club members stated that they would turn over their books and their library fund of $250.00.

“It was finally decided to leave the formulation of a plan to a committee of twenty members, to be appointed by the mayor, who were to meet and recommend some method by which the library might be started by the time the new quarters in the city building would be ready for occupancy.

“Following instructions, the committee met in the Commercial Rooms in March, 1908, with Mrs. C. E. Hitchcock presiding and Miss Ida V. Hoge as secretary. It was voted to organize a Wellington Library Association to be Incorporated under the state laws relating to public libraries, to establish and maintain a free public library in the city of Wellington, The capital stock was to he $5000.000 at $1.00 per share. Ed T. Hackney was appointed chairman of a committee to draw up articles of incorporation and a constitution and by-laws.

“Another meeting was called by Mayor T. A. Hubbard in June, 1908, for all persons interested in the establishment of a public library. It was voted to incorporate according to recommendations of the committee of twenty. It was voted to call the library the Prentis Library as a token of their appreciation for the years of service of the Prentis Club members through a period of more than eight years.

“The following people were elected as directors for the first year: Messrs F. E. Carr, W. H. Maddy, W. M. Massey, E. T. Hackney, A. A. Belsley, W. H. Schulte, Charles Hunter, W. C. McCroskey, O. W. Julian, H. W. Herrick, and H. L. Woods; Mes-dames J. R. Herrick, Ed T. Hack-ney, Charles Havens, R. W. Hitchcock; and Misses Maude A. Price; Ida V. Hoge, Katherine Luening and Myrtle Nelson.

“The city building was accepted by the the council August 3, 1908 and on September 8, the room in the southeast corner of the second floor was turned over to the Federated women for their library. The ladies of the W. C. T. U. donated a small collection of books, which with the gift from the Federation and Prentis Club made quite a creditable beginning. A portion of the money given by the Federation was used for furniture. and the rest for the purchase of reference books. The Prentis library, being a circulating library, included practically all fiction books.

“Rev. S. E. Busser, superintendent of the reading rooms along the Santa Fe system, offered the use of $500.00 worth of books, the only provision being that the Santa Fe employees be permitted to use the room and that the company reserve the right to reserve the books whenever they desired to do so. The offer was accepted. Miss Katherine Hackney was elected librarian and kept the library open every Saturday afternoon. The fines paid by patrons for overdue books constituted the librarian’s salary.
“On May 16, 1914, was held the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board appointed by Mayor George H. Hunter. The purpose of the board meeting was to discuss ways and means to erect a city library building. Mr. Hunter was president of the board, Mr. M. C. Burton was vice-presi ent, Mrs. Ellen Clayton, secre-

tary and E. B. Roser, treasurer Other members were: Mrs. E. T Hackney, Mrs. W. H. Maddy, Mr H. L. Buttrey, Miss Maude A, Price, and Mr. W. H. Burks. A committee was appointed to in-vestigate possible building sites for the library building.

“On April 10, 1915 it was voted to buy the present site from the Long Bell Lumber Company for $3,500.00. They then began to negotiate for a Carnegie endowment, and in December of the same year the Carnegie Corporation agreed to give the city $17,-500.00, provided the city would spend ten percent of the above amount each year in the maintenance of the library. Oh June 19, 1916 the board of directors accepted the building from J. H. Mitchell, contractor. Miss Gretchen Flower was elected to organize the library and serve as its first librarian, and Miss Katherine Hackney was her assistant. The Prentis Library was turned over to the Carnegie Library Board as a nucleus for the new library, and the Wellington Library Board ceased to function.

“Each succeeding year the Wellington Public Library has grown bigger and better, and its circulation has increased.

“Much time and effort has been consumed in the accumulation of the above facts and many local citizens have assisted in the completing of this record. If any one, by reading this unpretentious history has been inspired a greater appreciation of the fine, modern library, or to deeper gratitude toward the loyal citizens who have made it poss sible, then this history will have served its purpose.”
Page 2 Wellington News May 28, 1957
The Library Corner
_________By Jack Prilliman__________

The month of May brings changes in many different ways. The weather, lawn and garden tell us that winter has really passed and ‘‘Sumer is icumen in.”
May means the end of school and the beginning of the long (for students) short (for teachers) summer vacation. May means adjusting from indoor to outdoor activities. Library patrons begin to look for lighter subjects in reading material something that can be read leisurely, perhaps under the shade of a tree or in a porch swing.
May means Memorial Day when our thoughts turn to those we have loved who are now gone. It also means reunions where we gather to reminisce with family members and former classmates.
In addition to the obvious changes, we also have changes in the library. Here in Wellington we revert to our summer hours. The library is open only one evening, Thursday, each week.
It also means that two library board members rotate off the board. Kansas library laws govern the way library trustees are selected and their tenure. Trustee terms are staggered so that two terms expire each year at the end of April. In this way continuity is assured and the possibility of “a whole new board” at one time is minimized.
However, the feeling of loss is not minimized when you lose people whom you have worked closely with on making decisions that may very well have a major impact on the future of the Wellington Public Library. This past month we lost not two, but three (because of a move from the state) trustees who had studied carefully the present and future needs of our library and played an active role in shaping our building plans.
We will sorely miss the support of Loretta Anderson, appointed to fill an unexpired term in 1977 and went on to be reappointed to two four-year terms (in 1979 and 1983); Betty Bean, appointed in 1979 and reappointed in 1983, and Kaye Hampton who was appointed in 1984 and resigned this past month to join her husband in Texas. Collectively these three trustees represented 21 years of library trustee stewardship.
What offsets the loss of these trustees is the knowledge that Mrs. Anderson and Mrs. Bean will retain their interest in the continued growth of the library service provided to the people of Wellington and by the quality of the credentials of the three
trustees appointed by Mayor Tackett to serve on the library board. They are Jan Korte, who replaced Betty Bean; Bob Weir, replacing Loretta Anderson; and Phyllis Johnson who replaces Kaye Hampton.
The makeup of the Wellington Public Library Board through April, 1988, will be: Chairman, Greg Renn; Vice-chairman, Jan Korte; Secretary, Louise Leslie; Treasurer, David Carr; SCKLS representative, Kenneth Jones; member, Robert Weir ; member, Phyllis Johnson.
We are looking forward to working with the board over the next year. There are some hard decisions that will have to be made. Decisions that will effect the quality of library service in Wellington over the next several generations.
We read something recently that seems apropos at this time “Libraries are the collective memory of mankind and the collective memory of our nation and our heritage, and trustees have to be imbued with that lofty notion. "
Courthouse news
FROM THE SHERIFF’S OFFICE Accident investigated
At 12:50 p.m. yesterday, Deputy Kenny Kelly investigated a non-injury accident one half mile west of County Road 56 on U.S. 160.
Involved was Ricky Lee Stewart of Robin Dale, Minn., driving an ‘85 Dodge Ram. He was eastbound on 160 while it was raining very hard. There was approximately six to eight inches of water standing on the road-way. Stewart met a tractor-trailer and when both vehicles met in the water, it washed the Stewart vehicle off the road into the south ditch where there was approximately four to four and a half feet of water. There was $100 of water damage to the vehicle.
DISTRICT COURT Suits filed
Ninth District Production, Credit Association f-k-a Kingman Produc-tion Credit Association vs. Keith Mortimer, Helen Mortimer and Cities Service Oil and Gas Cor-poration, foreclosure.
HCA Health Services of Kansas vs. Debbie Bathhurst a-k-a Debbie San-del and Douglas Bathhurst, recovery of money.
Winfield Medical Arts vs. Jim Hunter, recovery of money.
REPORTING
MAIN STREET
By Eddie J. Shaw
Wellington Daily News 6/9/52

A reader of Reporting Mainstreet mails in an interesting and timely bit of news. The dedication of our new courthouse and jail brings to the minds of some of our oldtimers the opening of the old jail which soon will be razed. This too, was a gala event but quite different from Saturday’s celebration. It was held on May 8, 1900, and the county com- missioners had invited all the residents of the county to attend a county fair to be held in their newest public building. Admission was free; but, there was a small charge for the extra attractions. The young women of the Prentis Study club of Wellington were the official hostesses and the proceeds from the fair were to be used to finance their pet project, the Wellington Public Library, which had been established in January of the same year. The building was appropriately decorated and the cells were converted into booths. Miss Ida Hoge and Miss Ethel Showalter were the business managers and Miss Gertrude Caldwell and Miss Effie Smiley comprised the finance committee. The remaining 16 members of the club acted as barkers for the concessions. It appeared that every citizen of the county was here to enjoy the festivities, for the building was packed. Mulvaney, the street vender, loaned his doll rack and Rubber balls and a thriving business was conducted in one of the booths. There was a fake art exhibit in one and a snake eater and a wild man performed in others, to the horror of the children. Candy, pop corn, peanuts and soft drinks were dispensed from other booths. A livestock show of baby chicks, rabbits, kittens and pigeons attracted much attention and also cash. A late sleet came up suddenly and special care had to be given the babies to keep them from being chilled. Walter Forsyth, one eye covered with a black patch, carried a hand organ upon which perched a monkey who collected pennies for the fund. He attracted as much attention from the youngsters as did the Pied Piper of folk lore. From beginning to end, the affair was a success both from a social and financial standpoint. The young women realized almost $100 for their efforts, a considerable sum in that day. Years later, one Wellington club woman remarked, “Where else could this have happened except in Wellington, Kas?” And with the tearing down of the old Third Ward school building — another landmark — George Harbaugh has in his bank window the original ticket chart of the school auditorium which was used for many programs and entertainments put on in that auditorium
blackboard slate from the school-at bargain prices . . Events of
Flag Day on Saturday; and Father’s Day this Sunday. Friday of this week will be Santa Fe payday, since the 15th falls on Sunday. Vacations have begun and the
Wellington people have started on their summer outings to lake shores, the coast and other points.

Kansas Children Again to Select Winning Author.
Emporia, Kas., Jan. 20.(AP)

—The master reading list from which Kansas school children will select a winning author was announced today for the 1958-59 William Allen White children’s book award program.
Children in the fourth to ninth grades cast ballots to select the winner among the 18 authors. About 32,000 votes were cast last year. Phoebe Erickson won the award for her “Daniel ’Coon.”
Dr. Orville L. Eaton, Emporia State college librarian and chairman of the White award administrative committee, listed these books for the 1958-59 choice:
“And the Waters Prevailed” by Moreau Barrainfer’ “The Corn Grows Ripe by Dotothv Rhodes; “Enchanted Schoolhouse "Enchanted Schoolhouse" bv Ruth Sawyer; “Enormous Egg" . by Olive Butterworth; “Fifer of San Jacinto" bv Lee McGriffin; “Fifteen” by Beverly Clearv; “House of Sixty Fathers” by Mein-dert'De Jong; "Lone Hunt;" by William O. Steele: “Miracles on Maple Hill by Vir-ginia Sorensen; “Mr. Justice Hoimes" by Clara Ingram Judson; "Night of the Hurricane*’ by Elizabeth Ladd; Old Yel-ler” bv Fred Gipson; “Peddler's Cart" by Elizabeth Coatsworth; “Ride on the Wind" by Alice Daigliesh; “Sea Lady;* by Julie Forsvth Batchelor; “Stars for Christy" by Mable Leigh Hunt; “Story of Caves" the Dorothv Sterling, and "Wizard in the Well” by Harry Behn.
Kansas Libraries
Club Year 60 - 61

The typical Kansas library resembles the pattern of library organization and government throughout the United States as Kansas has many varieties of libraries —- institutional, church, state, county, city and township libraries. There are libraries that are supported by taxes, supported by clubs, that have income from endowments, from rents, and even public utilities. All libraries, regardless of source of income, that serve the general public, fall into the general class of public libraries. Statistical reports filed in Topeka in 1959 show that in Kansas 12 first class cities, 77 second class cities and 186 third class cities have public libraries. In our own Sumner County we have 3 public libraries which are located in Argonia, Belle Plaine, Caldwell, Conway Springs, Mulvane, Oxford, South Haven and Wellington.

Libraries, in the early days, as now, were the hand maidens of education.

Many Kansas towns owe their present library facilities to public spiritied women, who gathered together a few old volumes from neighbors and earned money to buy more by putting on ministrel shows, chicken pie suppers and fairs. They catalogued books and distributed them and finally persuaded fellow townspeopIe to take over and to vote taxes for the support of their libraries.

By such means libraries came into being at Newton, Ottawa, Eureka, Girard, Independence, Iola, Coffeyville, Leavenworth, McPherson, Yates Center, Pratt, Baxter Springs, EI Dorado and Burlington.
(Kan. Lib. — page 2)

If this sounds like familiar history, perhaps I should add Wellington and other towns to this list, but they were not included in the book from which I gleaned the information above.

The Atchison Public Library Association composed entirely of women, raised funds for books during the early eighties by giving a fan drill at the home of Mrs. John J. Ingalls. In Cottonwood Falls nearly every family offered either money or labor to support the library, which was housed in the recorders office of the Chase County courthouse about 1873. A similar enterprise was undertaken in Cawker City, also in 1873, when a group of men organized the Hesperian Literary Club, each of them paying five dollars toward the purchases of books which were placed on the shelves in Smith and Tucker's law office. Another example to show that Kansas men, as well as Kansas women, were interested in establishing libraries in Kansas is found in Fort Scott where Eugene Ware presented the town with a public library and as long as he lived in the city, he paid the cost of its upkeep.

Today, you will find in Ulysses, a very attractive, not too large, new modern public library. The history of this library reads like a book from its shelves. Margaret Hill McCarter, a very well-known Kansas author, was in Ulysses in 1914 to give one of her popular lectures before teachers attending the Grant County Institute. It was only natural for her to ask about their reading facilities. When she learned
(Kan. Lib. — page 3)

that Grant County did not have a library, she not only donated a copy of each of her own books, but included in the gift two hundred good books which her friend,
Mrs. Wilson, had placed at her disposal and told her to place where she liked. Margaret Hill McCarter chose the town of Ulysses and so all the books were sent there freight prepaid. The country commissioners supplied shelves in the court house for the books and furnished the supplies needed. This was the beginning of today's Wilson Memorial Public Library in Ulysses.

The word “first" always carries with it a mark of distinction. Two Kansas libraries make claim to having the word "first" attached to the name of their library. The early history of these two libraries is quite different. The "Coal Creek Library at Vinland" is older than the state itself. Imagine the contrast of coming from a cultured New England community in the early fifties to the prairies homes of Kansas where there was only an occasional newspaper and almost no books! To meet such a situation, it is very understandable that thoughts of many young people turned to thoughts of books. In the summer of 1859 Annie Soule, a seventeen year old girl, suggested to her friend Martha Cutter that they organize a literary society patterned after one in New England, It has been said that one object they had was to prevent dancing from becoming the only amusement in the community. The
(Kan. Lib. — page 4.)

literary society soon developed into a library association. The members collected fifty cents dues from each member for the purchase of books from Philadelphia. Each volume in the first shipment had a piece of jewelry attached to it. These trinkets were sold at the next meeting to make more money to add to the library funds. Annie bought a watch which she claimed never ran unless she did. Their funds were further increased by means of chicken dinners and auction sales.

From 1859 to 1875 the library was kept at the Cutter farm. Then the books were moved to Grange Hall, which served as a library building for 25 years, when the association bought a lot and built a one-room structure for the purpose. It is written in newspaper clippings that the minutes of the first meeting of the Coal Creek Library Association are still stored in a desk belonging to the Cutter family. The library started with 10 volumes, but books continued to come in at a steady pace until 1920. Thus from this meager beginning has sprung our great library system all over Kansas. How thrilled these two girls would have been if they could have foreseen the recently built, fine, modern public libraries of Topeka and Hutchinson or the Copeland Memorial Library at Douglas.

While historians give Coal Creek library of Vinland the distinction of being the first
public library in Kansas, another library, started fifteen years later, makes claim to being the first Public Free Library in Kansas.
(Kan. Lib. — page 5)

On October 31, 1929, a memorial tablet, a gift from the "Grand Army of the Republic" and other citizens, was erected in Peabody, Kansas, in honor of this library. The claim of this library is based on the fact that the Vinland library was formed by a the early settlers who put their own books together in a common stock for the use of the contributors and was maintained afterwards by the regular payment of certain sums by its patrons. On account of the dues paid by members for the use of the library it was not considered a free library.

Peabody owes the inception of their library to an eastern of the east, a capitalist, who furnished the means by which it might be built. The lots on which the library was built were bought by the town company and the people of the community itself, but the building, its furnishings and the books were donated outright by the eastern capitaiist.

The young village had left a favorable impression on his mind when he had visited it earlier and he wanted to show his interest in its future welfare. The only thing he asked in return was that the public authority make themselves responsible for the care of the library and its permanent maintenance and that it should be free to any of the residents who wished to avail themselves of the library's advantages. This responsibility was assumed by the township board. Within a short time, a frame building was
Kan. Lib ---- page 6

built and books began arriving. The roof rose above the sky line in the early village
and to some of the pioneers it seemed too high. They complained that it was a
"temptation to the winds". Nevertheless it weathered all winds and storms for
more than half a century, and while removed from its former site, Peabody folks
regard it as one of the historic buildings in Kansas. When reading the history
of this early library at Peabody, I wondered about the fate of the first free library building. Knowing Peabody was Mrs. Floyd Anderson's home town, I asked
her, about-its—fate. She said she would find out for me, and this is the reply
she received from a letter she wrote:
The Peabody GAZETTE-HERALD Mr. and Mrs. William V. Krause, Publishers
P. 0. Box 257 Peabody, Kansas Phone YU 3-2185

Dear Mrs. Anderson:

The Peabody library building still stands. It has been moved twice, however, since the construction of a more modern building .

The building was erected in 1875 by F. H. Peabody, a vice-president on the Santa Fe Railroad. He also stocked it with a large number of volumes. In return for this generous act, the town was named for him.

When the present library was constructed, the old building was moved to the city park and was falling into disrepair when the ladies of the Women's Relief Corps rescued it and had it moved to its present location just south of the Grade School on Maple street. They now maintain it and use it as their meeting hall.

With the Centennial putting an additional emphasis on the history of the state and local areas, some discussion has been held about possibly moving the building to the rear of the library lot again and making it into a museum or shrine. This will depend on many things, of course, and is still just discussion.

I'm sure you are aware that this was the first free public library established in the State of Kansas.

Sincerely,
W. V. Krause, signature
W. V. Krause
Kan Lib. --- page 7

The 1959 statistics of Kansas libraries lists the Peabody Carnegie Library, originated in I874, a library of a third class city, a township library, tax supported, with 6908 voIumes which is open 30 hours each week, six days a week. These statistics do not list a library at Vinland, Kansas.

Two other firsts among Kansas libraries ----- Emporia had not only the first
Carnegie library in the state "the Anderson Memorial Library", but also has the distinction of being the first Carnegie library erected on any college campus and the first Carnegie library built west of the Mississippi. This library was erected several years after the death of Col. John B. Anderson, (who was always interested in education) by his friend Andrew Carnegie, who scattered free public library buildings, like a sort of literary Johnny Appleseed over the length and breath of our country. It has been said that while a new library building on the campus of the college of Emporia will be completed in 1960 that the Anderson Memorial Library building, although surrounded by architecture of a new age, will not disappear from the college scene. A Useful purpose will be found for the building which stands as a symbol and heritage of the College of Emporia.

Not only first in Kansas, but the world’s only book-front library is to be found in Liberal, Kansas. In 1950 a permit for a new library building in
Kan. Libg --- page 8

Liberal — to honor armed service members was taken out. The front of this building is unique and interesting because it is in the shape and form of an open book. It was built with money from popular subscription. Miss Gertrude Mahan, the librarian, has remarked that "Memorial Library" stands in Cooper Park, a tribute to the loyalty of the Liberal Woman’s Club, the city and country administration and many, many devoted citizens.

To establish and maintain libraries has been a continuing goal of the General Federation. The American Library Association credits women’s clubs with establishing or sponsoring 85% of all libraries in America today. In the early years traveling libraries circulated by club women often constituted the only ones available to inhabitants of rural districts. Many clubs owned and operated their own libraries and converted them into social centers for all kinds of community activities. Thousands of public libraries were initiated by clubs which volunteered the services of their members and financed book shelves. Some states owe their state libraries, their library commissions, their bookmobiles and permissive legislation for county libraries to the efforts of club members.
Page 9

The General Federation, not only helped, establish public libraries throughout the United States; but also in co-operation with the American Library Association they were successful in obtaining Federal Support for libraries.

This federal fund first became available in 1956 for a period of 5 years. The Federal Library Service Act contained two major provisions; first, that no money shall be spent for the construction of buildings or acquiring land; second, that services resulting from expenditures shall be limited to rural areas.

A bill relating to a 5-year extension of this law, was introduced to the 1960 congressional session in Washington. Senator Carlson of Kansas was a sponsor of the senate bill. This bill not only passed, but for the first time, the full requested amount of $ 7,500,00 was appropriated by Congress, and will be available for fiscal 1961.

To accomplish all this, not only to enlarge Federal appropriations, but also to stimulate the states to set up their own programs, with matching funds, required increasing, devoted, and desperately hard work by the General Federation, the American Library Association, and many citizens interested in public libraries.

The statement has been made that Kansas still has 336,000 persons, without access to local library service. The Kansas plan, for receiving funds, produced by this Federal Library Service Act calls for strengthening the traveling Libraries Commission of Topeka, as the library is to serve for the State Agency. Today the four Commission staff members have doubled the number of new and vital books available for community loans, and two book mobiles have been purchased to show communities what this type of service will mean.


Page 10

The Lawrence Free Public Library provides the citizens of Lawrence with good library service.

The University of Kansas Library is divided into many fine library sections, such as Mathematics, Medical, Music, Engineering, Education, Law and Science.
Residents of Kansas may obtain books from K. U. on “Inter-Library Loan” envelopes of clippings, on many subjects are also available by paying a small fee of 25 cents and the postage.

The City of Topeka has many important libraries of various types. Topeka Public Library offers many improved library services. Horace Mann, first librarian of the new modern building believes that a library should serve as a university for the people.

Kansas Historical Library is a very distinguished library and many Kansans are beginning to make use of it. Its steady growth has made it one of the best sources for information concerning Kansas History available anywhere in the country. Writers are the most prolific users of the library. Well known characters, who played an important part in early history of Kansas and the Southwest are on parade in scores of volumes. The library as few equals in special fields, Kansas western and Indian history and in genealogy.

The Kansas State Library, nears a century of services. It has a staff of professional people, most of them long time employees, who are able to turn from memory to the proper reference file for information sought by callers. It operates in four general fields: a law division, a medical division; a legislation and general reference, and a traveling library. Full time members of the law division are graduate lawyers Traveling Libraries Commission, from which library books are sent to all parts of the state, to individuals, to school libraries and to public libraries in communities of 8000 population or less. A trunkful of fifty volumes may be obtained on loan, by paying a small fee for the cost of transportation.

Psychiatry as a specialized branch of medicine is young. Psychiatric libraries are younger. The three libraries in Topeka, which are specifically dedicated to furnish research for this broad medical specialty are the Menninger Clinic Library, Winter’s Veteran’s Administration Hospital Medical Library and the Topeka State Hospital Professional Library.


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Page 11

With the passing of years, histories of Kansas Libraries are constantly changing. Each year or so a small library falls by the wayside and closes its doors.

Entirely new libraries have been built. A few of the larger libraries have built magnificent, modern, new buildings on new locations. Many others have made extensive improvements by adding wings onto their old buildings. Others to provide better and separate departments for children, have made children’s departments in their basements, for example this has been done in recent years in the libraries at Dodge City, Emporia, Great Bend, Garden City, and Ottawa.

At a cost of $25,000 the public library at Ellsworth has been remodeled and an addition to the building at the rear, nearly doubles the floor space. New wings have been added to the library in Liberal.

A new modern Public Library at Belleville had a formal, open house on Oct. 25, 1956, where all the public was invited to view the library’s new books and fine, modern facilities.
One of the newest buildings at Kansas State Teacher’s College in Emporia is the “William Allen White Memorial Library.”

The “Memorial Lounge” houses manuscripts and books by White, which are kept in fireproof vaults. This lounge is equipped with a fireplace and living room furniture, for the leisurely enjoyment of these treasures by the public.

The “Bradford Memorial Library” in nearby El Dorado was formally dedicated on the afternoon of Sunday, Sept 27, 1960. Dr. Franklin M. Murphy, the chancellor of the University of Kansas (at that time) delivered the main address. This beautiful, one story, and full basement building, represents a gift of $200,000 by Mrs. Ruth Bradford, in memory of her husband.

The planning of the building and its construction had taken 2 years of hard work on the part of a dedicated membership of the library board.

The building occupies the central position on an entire block of ground in South El Dorado. This new library building replaces the old structure which had served the community for


Page 12

Nearly half a century, and which was one of the fifty or more public library buildings in Kansas, made possible through funds from the Andrew Carnegie Foundation. The exterior design of the library is in the form of a rough, Greek Cross, and is constructed of sawed Silverdale stone.

I understand that Rolla Clymor, Editor of the El Dorado Times and president of the library board, made arrangements that the spring meeting of the South Central district of Kansas Public Libraries of which Wellington is a member, will be held in El Dorado. Most likely, the librarians and members of our board will be able to attend. I might even go myself.
A new Kansas Library in course of construction, which of course is important not only to Kansas but also of both national and international interest is the new Eisenhower Library, in course of construction at Abilene.

When President Eisenhower turns the White Houser over to his successor in 1961, he will have to remove 2,000 drawers of personal papers. This historian’s treasure will be transferred to Abilene Kansas for the “Eisenhower Presidential Library,” to be run by the Federal Government. This library is being built and equipped with 3 million dollars contributed by residents of 50 states.

It is worthy of having a whole paper written about it, as well as about the many other libraries [names of libraries] in Topeka.

We all know that it takes someone with foresight, and the basic belief in the importance of libraries to fight to see that libraries come into existence and stay alive, that improvements are made as years go by, and that their survival are due to the interest and work of the people of the community.

The town of Wellington does not have a new public library building; to date we have not added any new wings, or moved the children’s dept. to the basement. That project has been discussed for several years but it seemed more important to aid in the crowded condition of the public schools. It would be an wonderful if some citizen would leave a large enough sum to build an added wing for adult use for the many who do not like to climb steps, but the building has been kept in excellent repair.


Page 13

Naturally, the Wellington Public Library is the Kansas Public Library of most interest to the people of Wellington. That, our library, has had a vital part in the education, culture, social life, and recreation of Wellington people is a fact of which we can all be proud.
Loyal citizens, throughout the years, have given of their time and knowledge, to serve on the Board of Directors, and their interest and support, has in a great measure, made the library, as it is today.

The people of Wellington, have never (openly, at least) complained of the tax levy for the support of the library. Many clubs and citizens have consistently added to the book collection, by their gifts of money and books. The citizens of the city, young and old, have expressed appreciation of having such a fine library available for their use.
The early history of our library is similar to many other Kansas Public Libraries, as it was established and operated by a band of public spirited young women, who belonged to a woman’s club. The Prentis Study Club.

It has been stated that in the fall of 1899, Mrs. Nobel Prentis, for whom the Prentis Study Club was named, paid a visit to these young people, and it was at her suggestion, that this club of 20 members decided to start a public library and that Harry Buttery kindly offered to the club the use of a few shelves in the rear of his store; and thus the Prentis Study Club, public library was launched.

During the club year of 1958 – 1959, the Prentis Study Club celebrated its Sixtieth Anniversary, and several of the charter members of the club attended that meeting. One could well wish that they had a tape available to refer to the many items of interest about the history of the Prentis Study Club Library that were related at that meeting regarding their successful early efforts to start a library in Wellington, which resulted in the Wellington Public Library of today.


Page 14

The Prentis Study Club Library changed locations several times, the members of the club took turns serving as librarians, the library continued to add to its book collection and extended use of this library was made by the citizens of Wellington.

After several years of steady growth had passed, it seemed advisable that a change of management should be made and the decision was made by the members of the Prentis Study Club to turn their library over to the City of Wellington, as a result.

The Wellington Public Library was established in 1916, following a three to one vote, of the citizens of Wellington on April 8, 1914, to equipt, and guarantee the upkeep and maintenance of a library. Following this act – the city of Wellington bought the lots, where a library building could be located.

The building was erected at a cost of $17,500 and was a gift to the city from Andrew Carnegie. The present library building was open to the public June 26, 1916.

The first Board of Directors, who were appointed by the mayor, George H. Hunger were:
Harry L. Buttrey, William H. Burbs, Martin C. Burton, Ellen R. Clayton, Mabel E. Hackney, Marry E. Maddy, Maude E. Price, and Emil E. Roser – The Mayor being a member, ex office – made an 9 member board. At this time there was no law which regulated how many terms board members could serve, and Mrs. Hackney served the library in this capacity many, many years.

In 1951, a law was passed which provided for a 8 member Board of Directors, and that each board member could only serve 2 terms of 4 years, or a total of 8 years.

An account of this law – the Wellington Public Library lost two valuable members in May 1960 – Mr. E. V. Reichley and Harold Sanner. Our own Katharine’s term will expire this coming year after 15 years of faithful service.

The present Board of Directors are:
1. President – Wm M. Murphy
2. 2. Vice-president – Earl Peter Mr. Geo. Renn
3. Secretary - Katharine Knowles
4. Treasurer – Earl Peters
5. Mrs. Arthur Champeny
6. Mrs. H. C. Davidson
7. Chas E. Watson
And Mayor Elmer M. Holt.

Members of the library staff are Mrs. Fred McCoy is librarian, Mrs. Chas. Mallory – full time assistant, 2 high school girls are employed as part-time assistants.

According to 1959 statistics the library has:
3,593 borrowers, 25,955 volumes in the book collection and circulated 51,758 books.


Page 15 [1st Grade - 1930; Born 1925; Graduated 1941.] (the note previous may apply to the writer of the letter mentioned in this article)

In conclusion, I would like to again refer to years gone by in our Wellington Public Library and quote from a page of letter written daughter Dorothy by a former student of hers, who like many other graduates of W.H.S. have kept in touch with their former teachers throughout the passing years, especially at Christmas time.

Perhaps I saved this page of the letter just for such an occasion as this, but at the time I first read it, it appealed to me, from the standpoint of how very careful librarians should be when dealing with little children on their first trip to the library.

To quote:
“Libraries have always fascinated me. They house so many mysteries of the world. I remember very vividly the first time I set foot in the Wellington Public Library.

Miss Anabel Williams, my first grade teacher at Old Third Ward, had one day imparted the exciting news to me, that I could find many books to read in a wonderful building, and furthermore could take them home with me for two weeks without paying a cent.

That afternoon instead of going home immediately, I walked the two blocks to the library, and with a rapidly beating heart, mounted the stairs on my wonderful quest. I didn’t know what to do, and the large “counter” looming just inside the door, stopped me in my tracks.

A very kind lady asked me what I wanted.

I simply stated that I wanted a book.

“Did I have a card?”

That bit of a questions ruined my dreams. I was completely crushed. I had never heard of a card that was needed.

The lady must have sensed my disappointment.

She promised me that I could take a book home with me, if I would also take a card home for my parents to sign. I was overjoyed, and after looking over several books, which the librarian showed me, carefully selected my first library book – “A Boy’s Life of George Washington.”

A new world was opened to me and I must admit



Page 16

that the gingerbread boy seemed pretty dull reading after that. For the next twelve years the Wellington Public LIbrary was as much a part of my education as any class in any school. By means of the library I explored the length and breadth of our country. I've fought every battle in the Civil War. I journeyed to every country in Europe. I found that there other newspapers in the country besides the Daily News. An in later years I discovered the rich history of Sumner County in the D. A. R. archives in the basement.

From that day until this I have been hopelessly under the spell of libraries, and I have a feeling I shall always be. I have visited some great libraries since that time, the Newbury of Chicago, the University libraries of Harvard and Princeton, the magnificent British Museum, the Louvre, too and our library here is Basil Switzerland, but perhaps the strongest attachment I have to any is to the library in Wellington, for there I met the world for the first time."

End of quote.
There is no way of knowing just what the W.P.L. has meant to hundreds of children of Wellington.

But I feel sure that the members of the Prentis Study Club who started the library, and many others of us who have given our time, money, and effort to support the library, throughout the years, cannot but know that the W.P.L. is a worthwhile project and should have our support in the years that lie ahead.



REFILING OF BOOKS at the City Library can become quite a chore but with the assistance of the Girl Scouts, librarian Olive McCoy finds the work a lot easier. Here, some of the scouts who are making library work a project are, from left: Kath-lee Welch and Judy Seimers of Troop 27; and Ruth Davis, Carol Jane Wallingsford and Linda Lamkin, Troop 41. Other Girl Scouts, not pictured, who are
in the Library Aide Service project, are Caryl Sue Howe and Jackie Sowders, Troop 41; and Johnie Mae Smith, Virginia Littou, Alice Cox, Mary Ann Willis and Janis Morris, Troop 27. Mrs. Don Welch is leader of Troop 27. She is assisted by Mrs. H. C. Seimers. Miss Nona Berghaus is leader of Troop 41. J — (Daily News Photo) Feb 1962
SENIOR HIGH BOOK EXHIBIT — The newest library books for high school readers are being shown to the student body of WHS this week in a book display representing 52 publishers. The exhibit includes some 235 titles, among them outstanding books in the fields of history, astronomy, mathematics and
literature. From Wellington the display travels to Kansas City schools. Examining some of the titles above are WHS students Harriet Schierling, LaVon Denny, Colleen Metzen, LaDonna Gleason, and Marilyn Stewart. (Daily News Photo by Tim Rogers)
LIBRARY ON WHEELS —The bookmobile makes a stop at the Wellington Public Library to unload a section of the latest titles. Driver Charles Reynolds offers a pair of volumes for the scrutiny of Mrs. Charles Gilliland and Well-
ington Librarian Olive McKoy. Mrs. Gilliland is Public Librarian at Hutchinson and the head of Grant Area 5, under whose auspices the Bookmobile program was put into effect. (Daily News Photo by Tim Rogers)
W D N Aug. 16, 1966,
Page 3
Society.
Eleventh Volume Of Encyclopedia Now at Library

The 11th volume of the Encyclopedia of World Art, currently being published by McGraw-Hill, has been placed in the Wellington Public Library by Mrs. Stewart Newlin, a former resident of Wellington now living in Lawrence.

This newest addition to the encyclopedia was given in memory of “Mr. Wellington,” Myron Vandenburgh.

When the encyclopedia is completed by Mrs. Newlin, it will be comprised of 15 volumes, totaling approximately 13,000 pages of text and pictures, of every culture, every major movement and figure in art since the beginning of recorded time.
Official County and City Paper Wellington Daily News
3-5-66
City Library Board Moves to Eliminate Rural Readers' Fee
The Wellington Library Board
has eliminated a fee formerly charged to residents outside the city limits for use of reading materials.

Since the facility is supported by city taxes, a small fee has, in the past, been assessed to non-Wellington (residents.
* * *
The library board, in its meeting this week, moved to abolish the fee in the apparent belief that such a move would encourage wider use of the library and help to create better community relations.

A new feature to be placed in service soon at the Wellington library is a phonograph record collection.

The collection has been made
possible through a memorial bequest from the estate of Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Barrett. Mrs. Barrett was a piano teacher in Wellington for many years.
* * *
At the session this week,
Charles E. Watson, Sumner County Attorney and president of the library board, joined the other members in a decision to hold a special meeting March 9 at 4:30 p.m. to plan redecoration work to the building.
In addition to Watson, the board members include Harold Pfalzgraf, vice president; Mrs. A. S. Champeny, secretary; Earl M. Peters, treasurer; Elton L. Hilt, ex-officio memer; Mrs. H. C. Davidson, Dick Winger and Gail Garrison.

Wellington Monitor Press
Then to Greensbur g.
Wellington Library News Notes 10-6-66
A NEW SERVICE AT THE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Wellington Public Library is participating in the new Number 5 Grant Area program. This Grant area consists of forty-eight libraries located in twelve neighbor counties.
At the present time a book mobile visits the library every two weeks and leaves fifty books for circulation. The books and book mobile are financed by Federal and state funds and there is no charge to the participating libraries.
This is an experiment in library cooperation and may be expanded later to include other services.
Wednesday was the second
visit the bookmobile has made to Wellington. The library patrons are enjoying the larger selection of books available through this rotating collection.
The Hutchinson Public Library has issued a list of 430 talking books which are available and will be sent out on the bookmobille to people wishing to order any of them for blind persons or bed patients unable to hold a book. Anyone wishing further information may contact the Wellington Public Library.
Wellington Daily News
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1966
The Bookmobile System

Books are the storehouses of man’s knowledge about himself and his universe. Anyone lucky enough to learn the wonder of books at an early age is lucky indeed; the world—any part of the world—is no farther away than the library.
In this connection, and speaking as lifelong book addicts, we hail the new bookmobile system which has been set up for the benefit of Kansas libraries and their patrons, including the library in Wellington.

Mrs. Olive McCoy, our fine local librarian, was telling us the other day that a woman who works adjacent to the library was mystified by the big vehicle that pulled up before the library every couple of weeks. “That man gets out,” Mrs. McCoy quoted the woman as saying, “And you all rush out and grab up armloads of books and take them inside. What’s going on, anyway?”

Well, Mrs. McCoy explained it to us, and we see it as an example of the continued effort being made to bring the widest possible variety of reading matter to library patrons.
Under a combined federal and state fund system, 12 counties and 48 libraries come within the jurisdiction of the bookmobile. The traveling book-bus makes a stop at each library at two-week intervals, leaving behind a selection of 50 books, encompassing every possible field —fiction, autobiography, science, sports—which are then made available to any one with a library card.

The rotation plan offers a wider selection of volumes than library budgets would normally allow. “It’s been a big help,” says Mrs. McCoy. “We have people who come in here and they’ve read everything in the place. Now we can offer newer and more unusual books to any one who wants them.”

To which we can only add “Vive la Bookmobile!”
WDN 9-27-65
Library Gets Copy Machine

The Wellington Public Library has joined the trend to automation by offering its clientele something new in the way of a do-it-yourself machine.
A Vico-matic photo copy machine has been installed at the library. It is coin-operated. For 25-cents, the customer can take home photo copies of pages from books, magazines or other reference materials.
Reproduction of letters, birth certificates, checks or any personal documents may be made conveniently.
The Vico-matic is completely fool-proof. Customers place the article to be copied face down on the glass plate, insert a quarter, press the button and in nine seconds a duplicate is ready. It is as easy as buying a candy bar.
The copying machine was installed at no cost to the city by the Image Company of Wichita. The librarian hopes the general public will make use of this service as well as the library customers.
Library Hour Change Listed
W.D.N. Sept 67
The Wellington Public Library will be open both mornings and evenings during the fall and winter seasons this year. Previously, there has always been a change of schedule with the opening of school, when the library was closed mornings and open evenings.
The Library Board of Trustees recently voted to have the library open longer hours to accomodate both early and late patrons. Mrs. Betty McGaughey who has been a part-time staff member has accepted full-time employment in the adult department in charge of circulation and reference work. So the library is now open 61 hours per week instead of 46 as formerly.
The Children’s Library will be open from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. on school days and from 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturdays. However parents are allowed to check out children’s books at the adult desk upstairs during other hours. Mrs. Pauline Mallory is the children’s librarian and her student assistant is Miss Lindsey McGee.
The library hours are as follows:
Monday through Thursday: 9:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Friday and Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
The library will be closed Labor Day. 4
126
Reflections of Sumner County, Kansas
Wellington Public Library
Wellington Municipal Golf Course Club House
Eisenhower Elementary
Box 86
Wellington, Kansas 67l52 May 3, 1977

To the Members of the Wellington Public Library Board:

During the years after she retired from the library, whenever she was riding by the library building, our mother, Nona Hart Dey, frequently expressed a wish that the grounds could be made more beautiful with flowering shrubs. With this wish in mind and with prior communication with library executives, monetary contributions rather than funeral flowers were invited from the public at the time of her death.

All members of our immediate family have now had the opportunity to study the proposed plans for landscaping the library grounds. Likewise we called on Mr. Charles Evanhoe, the designer at Hillside Nursery, to discuss the suggestions that developed from family members and found a complete rapport as to the feasibility and appropriateness of the substitutions desired. Mr. Evanhoe considered that the proposed shrubs were ideal for the period and classical design of the library. He quickly indicated desirable locations on a copy of the plan.

We would like to offer the following suggestions:
No. I — Eliminate the spirea at each side of the front steps and substitute instead on each side two abelia grandiflora (glossy abelia), an upright crape myrtle and two hypericum hidcote (sometimes called St. John's wort).
No. II — Eliminate the privet hedge. As we understood the designer, Mr. Evanhoe, he felt that the walk to the children's library detracted from the perfect symmetrical balance of the building and that the hedge would screen this walk. We think the hedge would accent the unbalance and that maintaining a hedge of that length could prove quite a problem.
No. III — At the end of the walk leading from the children's library to Jefferson street, add two winged burning bushes (euonymous alatus).
No. IV — In order to create a more attractive vista from both Jefferson and 7th streets, in the northeast corner near the other city buildings, add a sort of memorial garden of flowering shrubs such as forsythia, flowering quince, winter honeysuckle with perhaps the addition of some bulbs such as tulips and iris.
No. V — We heartily approve the replacement of the old elm trees with more attractive and suitable trees and the other elements of the plan.
We do not understand the estimate of $432.00 for 720 euonymus plants and wonder if this might be reduced in view of the added shrubs*
A list of the recommended substitutions and additions with costs per Mr. Evanhoe's informal estimates is attached. For information, notations of questions asked and answered received are also attached.

The total addition to the Nursery's previous estimate is approximately
$300.00 --- $200.00 of which is for shrubs in the otherwise untreated northeast
corner. The deletion of the privet hedge would be at a saving of about $150.00 of the original estimate.
You do not as yet have our family gift to the memorial planting, which will likely be a minimum of $200.00. When the plans are finalized and cost estimates arrived at, various members of our family want to pick specific plantings that will be in their own minds their special gifts.

We realize of course that the gifts in the memory of our mother are only a small part of the total costs and the library board will have to act in accordance with their budget restrictions, but it would be deeply appreciated by Mrs. Dey's children if the board would adopt and approve the plan as amended and contract at this time for at least some planting in the fall of 1977.

The landscaping would be a most fitting memorial to the devoted service
provided the public by Nona Hart Dey.

With deep appreciation tor your help and interests.
Edmund Hart Dey Joseph Elbert Dey Dorothy Ruth Dey
by:
Miss Dorothy Dey
Box 86
Wellington, Kansas 67152
RECOMMENDED CHANGES AND ADDITIONS to landscaping plan for the Wellington Public Library by Hillside Nursery, Wichita:

1. On each side of the library steps, use 2 abelia, 2 hypericum and 1 crape myrtle instead of 2 Vanhoutte spirea.
Costs: Abelia @ $4.50-6.00 say $21.00 4 hypericum @ $4.50 18.00
2 crape myrtle @ $4.50 or 13.50 say $27.00
66.00
plus labor @ 55% 36.00
$102.00
in place of: 4 Vanhontte spirea @ $7.50 30.00
plus labor @ 55% 16.00
$46.00 increase of $56.00
2. Plant two burning bush (dwarf, compact) at the street side of the walk from the children's library.
Costs: 2 @ $12.00 $24.00
Labor 13.00
$37.00
2. For the northeast comer, a right-angled small row of flowering shrubs to beautify and screen standing buildings
4 flowering quince — (upright, red only) @ $9.00 BB $36.00
2 forsythia @ $7.50 or $12.00 say $ 24.00 24.00
4 winter honeysuckle @ $7.50 to 9.00 BB say 36.00
1 redbud @ $25.00 up say 35.00
131.00
plus labor @ 55% 72.00
$203.00

(It is thought a club or circle could be encouraged to plant and maintain a row of flower bulbs in front of the shrubs.)
5. Review item for 720 euonymus vine type $432.00 and 4 c.f. bale of peat moss $59.50, plus labor of approximately $240.00, a total of $732.
Could this be reduced up to half in view of additional planting?
Question:
Magnolia Grandiflora — is this hardy enough under cold winters and hot winds?
Mr. Evanhoe said he could point out several thriving examples in Wichita.
Photinia — isn't it subject to mildew and black spot?
No, the variety — Photinia Frasieri ■— is supposed to be resistant to mildew
Frobel spirea?? — Is low growing, blooms red May-June and in fall is bright red-green
Abelia? blooms white for an extended period; attractive bush
Hypericum?----makes a good border 3-4 feet in height, bright yellow-cupped
flowers are produced in profusion in late spring and last until fall
Mugo pine? — Isn't it likely to be slow; wouldn’t Candian Yew be better?
Not in the location at the start of the walk where there is no shade. Too much sun is bad for yews.
10 Tamarix?-----It is tamarix juniper, a real low evergreen.
The (Trustees of the Wellington Public Library announced today that the landscaping

started two years ago is now finished and only time for the trees and shrubs to grow is needed to complete the project.

Several years ago the Library Trustees hired the Hillside Nursery of Wichita to design a plan to begin landscaping the library grounds. In explaining his plans, the landscape artist stressed that he tried to work out a design compatible with the architecture of the building. He felt the first need was to replace the elm trees that had. died and to plant back-up trees that would eventually take the place of the remaining old elms.
Thus three sugar maples, two sweet gum and two gingko trees and some holly bushes along the bare east wall were planted two years ago and the start of the landscape project began.

Thanks go to the Chisholm Trail Campers for their help. Last fall the local campers spent a day at the library planting tulip, iris and lycoris bulbs. In recent days they returned to furnish a complete spring clean-up for the library grounds.

Thanks also go to the friends and family of Nona Hart Dey for their generous contributions which made it possible to add many blooming shrubs to the landscaping project.

Fifty years ago, on Dec. 17, 1929, the local newspaper announced that landscaping at the library had been completed with the planting of junipers, arborvitae and tulip bulbs. As time went by, the gnarled old trees became anything but a scene to delight the beholder. During the years she was librarian, Mrs. Dey longed to replace the aged evergreens with flowering shrubs.

Thus at the time of her death in April 1977, a memorial fund in honor of Nona Hart Dey, a librarian at the Wellington Public Library from 1929 to 1958, was set up and the generous contributions of her friends and family were added to the fund for landscaping which had been established by the Library Trustees.

(library landscaping — p. 2)

These contributions which provided a number of additional blooming shrubs for spring and fall color.

Two mugo pines have been placed at the end of the front sidewalk, and identical plantings made on each side of the front of the building. These include two magnolia trees, columnar junipers, tamarix junipers, eunonymous, burning bushes, and abelias. Eunonymus coloratus has also been planted for ground cover and weed control.

On the west side near the walk leading to the Children’s Library, are two burning bushes, pyracantha and crepe myrtle to provide bright color in the fall.

At the back of the library, the family and friends of Mrs. Dey provided a memorial garden of forsythia, flowering quince, redbud and honeysuckle.

The Library Trustees and the many friends of Mrs. Dey who provided donated the additional funds hope the completed landscaping project will bring much pleasure to the people of the community for many years in the future.
Pauline Mallory To Retire from Library Wellington News 4-6-72
Two boys, carrying? between them a cardboard carton, edged down the steps to the Children’s Library and entered. One Room of the Wellington Public looked about doubtfully, “Where we going to put ’em while we get our books?”
The other spoke confidently, “On Mrs. Mallory’s desk. They’ll be safe there.”
And while they browsed, two baby skunks slept peacefully on the desk of the Children’s Li-
brarian, Mrs. Charles Mallory.
Someone else will occupy that “safe” desk after May 16, for Pauline Mallory is retiring after sixteen years at the library.
When interviewed, Mrs. Mallory said she had no thought of becoming Children’s Librarian when she took a part-time job with the library in May of 1956. In fact, there wasn’t a Children’s Room then. All books for children were stashed in one corner of the big room upstairs. But it
was soon apparent that Mrs. Mallory had two qualities that made her particularly valuable to young patrons — a love of children and of books.
And so, when the present Children’s Room was opened in February, 1962, it was not surprising that the Board of Trustees asked Mrs. Mallory to be the first Children’s Librarian. She remembers the delight of the boys and girls over having their own room. One said, “Gee, it’s pretty! down here. Better ’n upstairs.” The Children’s room is open Monday through Friday from 2 to 6 p.m., and Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. During the summer, it is open every day, except Sunday, from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
During her tenure, Pauline Mallory has seen many changes. “We now have over ten thousand volumes for children,” she said proudly. In the old days when a teacher gave an assignment, “Read a biography,” the children would come to Mrs. Mallory frightened by such an idea. Biographies were books grownups read. That fear no longer exists. There are shelves of biographies written for every grade level. “We even have books about famous Americans that third-graders can enjoy,” Mrs. Mallory said. She also called attention to a long row of books about Space. “These had not been written when the Children’s Room opened,” she said.
When asked about the Story Hour, Mrs. Mallory said, “That was started soon after we opened the Children’s Room. Mrs. Allen Felt went to Emporia and took a course in story-telling and
started it.”
Today the Story Hour is capably carried on by Neva Kabriel, for four and five-year-olds, from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. each Friday. From twelve children, the attendance has grown to over forty.
“Our Record Department is new,” Mrs. Mallory said. “We have 113 records that may be checked out.” These range from stories from the classics to Tubby the Tuba. There are many favorite musical ones. Mrs. Mallory says when she sees a boy or girl sitting rapt at the record player with head phones damped on, she knows he will soon be checking out another record.
But the Record Department is not the newest department of the Children’s Room. That distinction belongs to the Picture Department. Here a child may check out a framed copy of a famous painting. Subjects range from the Old Masters to Walt Disney. The fee is from 15 cents to 25 cents per month.
When asked what she was going to do with all her free time, Mrs. Mallory said that she and her husband, Charles Mallory, now retired, planned to travel. They will go to Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to see a granddaughter graduate. In September they will be fishing in the Ozarks. And in October they will travel to Phoenix to visit their son Tom, and soak up the sunshine of Arizona.
In the meantime, the Board of Trustees is accepting written applications for the position of Children’s Librarian of the Wellington Public Library. A prime requisite will be: love of children and of books.
Pauline Mallory Assists Young Readers

Wellington Public Library landscaping project completed
The Trustees of the Wellington Public Library announced today that the landscaping started two years ago is now finished and only time for the trees and shrubs to grow is needed to complete the project.
Several years ago the Library Trustees hired the Hillside Nursery of Wichita to design a plan to begin landscaping the

library grounds. In explaining his plans, the landscape artist stressed that he tried to work out a design compatible with the architecture of the building. He felt the first need was to replace the elm trees that had died and to plant back up trees that would eventually take the place of the remaining old elms.
Thus three sugar maples, two sweet gum and two gingko trees and some holly bushes along the bare east wall were planted two years ago and the start of the landscape project began.
Thanks go to the Chisholm Trail Campers for their help. Last fall the local campers spent a day at the library planting tulip, iris and lycoris bulbs. In recent days they returned to furnish a complete spring cleanup for the library grounds.
Thanks also go to the friends and family of Nona Hart Dey for their generous contributions
which made it possible to. add many blossoming shrubs to the landscaping project.
Fifty years ago, on Dec. 17, 1929, the local newspaper announced that landscaping at the library had been completed with the planting of junipers, arborvitae and tulip bulbs. As time went by, the gnarled old trees became anything but a scene to delight the beholder. During the years she was librarian, Mrs. Dey longed to replace the aged evergreens with flowering shrubs.
Thus at the time of her death in April 1977, a memorial fund in honor of Nona Hart Dey, a librarian at the Wellington Public Library from 1929 to 1958, was set up and the generous contributions of her friends and family were added to the fund for landscaping which had been established by the Library Trustees. These contributions provided a number of additional blooming shrubs for spring and fall color.
Two mugo pines have been placed at the end of the front sidewalk, and identical plantings made on each side of the front of the building. These include two magnolia trees, columnar junipers, tamarix junipers, eunonymus, burning bushes, and abelias. Eunonymus coloratus has also been planted for ground cover and weed control.
On the west side near the walk leading to the Children’s Library, are two burning bushes, pyracantha and crape myrtle to provide bright color in the fall.
At the back of the library, the family and friends of Mrs. Dey
provided a memorial garden of forsythia, flowering quince, redbud and honeysuckle.
The Library Trustee and the many friends of Mrs. Dey who donated the additional funds hope the completed landscaping project will bring much pleasure to the people of the community for many years in the future.

May 15, 1979
MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 1971
30,000 BOOKS AVAILABLE HERE TODAY
Aug 23, 1971
In Appreciation of the Public Library

Those of us who have been especially concerned with the production off the Wellington Centennial edition are most grateful to the City of Wellington, the many people who have served on the Library Board since 1916 and the staff of the Wellington Public Library, both past and present.
Without the resources available at the library, the material in this special edition of the News would have been impossible to secure. Many times in the last two years we have searched for information concerning events of the various events of the various eras of United States history that we might understand better some of the things that happened in Wellington. The information we needed about our town and county has been endless, and the items gleaned from microfilms of old and long since defunct newspapers invaluable.
So it is with much appreciation that the DAILY NEWS says thank you to the Wellington Library for all the help given in producing the Centennial paper.

WELLINGTON LIBRARY—
1971
On Oct. 30, 1924, Mrs. Noble
Prentis returned to Wellington to visit again the club site had visited so many years before when she had challenged a small group of gay, pleasure-loving young women that they
should find something worthwhile to do for their town.
After a delicious dinner at the Harvey House, the Prentis Club and their guests assembled at the home of Mrs. Sophia Knowles while Mrs. Prentis listened with great pleasure at the accomplishment her suggestion had brought about.
It is too bad that Mrs. Prentis cannot return today to see the real result of that long ago challenge.
The present library staff includes Mrs. Leroy McGaughey, Mrs. Charles Mallory, Mrs. Fred Erker and two student assistants, Patty Kreifels and Eli-
zabeth Locke. Serving on the Library Board are Mayor Herman Zoglmann, Mrs. Willard Voils, Mrs. C. E. Russell, Mrs. J. W. Garland, Mrs. Garland Mountz, R. G. Morris, R. J. Renn, and Howard Frazer.
As of Jan. 1, 1971, the annual circulation figures included 41,-059 adult and 23,759 juvenile or a total off 64,818. At the Wellington library 4072 people have a library card of which 738 are rural patrons. There are 30,477 books on the shelves; and 174 magazines and periodicals are received during the year. The average daily circulation figure is approximately 200 each day.
KANSAS STATE LIBRARY
State Capitol, Third Floor Topeka, KS 66612-1593 913-296-3296 800-432-3919 Established August 25, 1855

July 23, 1985
To: Library Directors in the 58 Kansas communities which have or have had a
Carnegie Library

From: Allen Gardiner, Chief Scribe of the State Library
Greetings! In case you haven't heard yet, November 25, 1985 marks the 150th anniversary of Andrew Carnegie's birth. And to help commemorate the occasion we have decided to publish a book! Andrew Carnegie gave money to build 58 library buildings in Kansas. Thirty-one of those buildings are still in use as libraries, while 27 have been vacated (at least 7 are torn down).
The book seeks to encompass not only the story of the library buildings, but the libraries themselves as public institutions. At first we were going to focus only on those which are still in use as libraries, but in order to have a clear picture of the Carnegie legacy — the book will be entitled The Carnegie Legacy in Kansas--we changed our minds and decided to write about all 58 communities. So, even where the Carnegie buildings have been abandoned for new, newer, or other buildings, the story of the library itself will be given, up to the present time.
I have spent considerable time poring over copies of the old Kansas Library Bulletin series (1932-1971), regional system newsletters, published statistical reports, and through the massive files of the Historical Society Library. And now I have composed a draft copy of the history of each library based on these sources.
In some cases I have been able to find pretty complete histories; in others, information has been amazingly scant. We intend to devote at least a page to each 1ibrary--giving the early history of the library, the story of the Carnegie grant and building (professional architectural descriptions are hoped for, whenever possible), the later story of the library, and a list of all the librarians.
What I am now asking each of you to do is to HELP me in what ways that you can. Please look over the enclosed draft, make additions and corrections, and return it to me. I am especially hopeful that you will be able to give the correct employment dates on the librarians and fill in the many gaps. Our records are quite incomplete (due to missing issues of various publications) so I was not able to learn as much as I had wanted to about each library.
Ah yes, photos! We will publish one exterior view of each library. The Historical Society has views of about 20 of the 58, and we have photos of about 4 others. Original views, when the buildings were new and not hidden by trees or shrubs, are the most desirable. I will note on your letter whether or not we have located a likeness which we think is good enough to print. If we have not, we are hoping that you will be able to provide us with one. If you want to have copies made, we will be using 4X5 prints, glossy preferred; or if you want to loan us a photo we will have a copy made and return the original to you. I am confident we will be able to find likenesses of all 58. . . at least we are off to a good start.

I wish I could tell you how exciting the preliminary research on this project has been! I have spent hours and hours piecing together the stories, and have come upon so many interesting ones. I believe this will make a truly marvelous story of the Carnegie legacy in Kansas.
I hope each of you will feel that way, too, even (or maybe especially) those who are no longer located in Carnegie buildings.
We would like to have these returned, with comments, photos, whatever, by September 1. Of course the sooner they are back the sooner I can write the final draft. Publication will be scheduled for November 1 at the latest.
If you have questions or comments, please let me know. We are always glad to hear from you.
Cheers!
WELLINGTON

The first library was opened by a lawyer named William Black in 1884-85, a small lending library. In 1895, Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson and W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and the various societies took turns operating it.

In the fall of 1899, Mrs. Noble Prentis suggested to the women that a public library be started. On New Year's Day, 1900, a big reception was held. The gentlemen were invited to attend, the price of admission being a book in place of the customary card. About 200 books was obtained in this manner. The library, under the sponsorship of the Prentis Club (named for Mrs. Prentis, the library founder), gained $340.48 in 1907 from the Lecture Course committee. The new city hall was completed and the club was given two rooms there for their library. In March 1908 it was agreed to organize a Wellington Library Association and incorporate it under the state law relating to public libraries. It was voted to maintain the name Prentis Library.

On May 16, 1914, the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board was held, and nearly a year later, on April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long Bell Lumber Co. for $3,500, and to set about to negotiate for a Carnegie endowment. On April 19, 1915, the Carnegie Corporation stated it would give $17,500 for a library building. J. H. Mitchell was the contractor. The board accepted the new building, of gray tapestry brick with trimmings of Bedford and Carthage limestone and red Spanish tile, on May 26, 1916. The dedication was held June 19, 1916.

Librarians: Miss Maude Barrett 1900 - 1902
Miss Katherine Hackney 1908 - 1916?
Miss Jeanne Flower Miss Kate Hackney Mrs. Lucy Nichols
Miss Marie Rowland - Jan 1932
Miss Florence Williams Jan 1932 - De 1938+
Mrs. Ruth Merryman 1940 -
[became Mrs. George Hepler, 1941] Se 1946+
Miss Ruth Warnock ± 1946 - Je 1948+
Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey
±Se 1952 - Je 1956+
Mrs. Fred (Olive) McCoy Je 1960 - 31 Dec 1970 (retired)
Mrs. Leroy (Betty J.) McGaughey
1971 -
McCoy, Olive "History of Wellington Public Library
Reviewed
Sources: The Wellington Daily News, Apr. 12, 1962.
The Wellington Daily News, Aug. 23, 1971.
Topeka Capital, May 27, 1916.
Kansas Library Bulletin (various issues)
Handbook of Kansas Libraries,AA 1902.
We do not have a photo and could sure use more (later) history.
KANSAS STATE LIBRARY
State Capitol, Third Floor Topeka, KS 66612-1593
913-296-3296 800-432-3919
Established August 25, 1855
August 28, 1985

Mrs. Betty McGaughey
Wellington Public Library
121 West 7th St.
Wellington, KS 67152

Dear Betty:

Thanks so much for sending the Dey history of the library, along with other "goodies." They have helped a lot. I am sending a copy of the final draft of the history that we will use in the Carnegie book unless you see something that should be changed, added or deleted. I thought the footnote was in order.

If you have any record of the architect, we can easily add it. I went back through the old newspapers until my eyes were sore but never did come across his name.

Do you want the pictures back? We will be happy to have them for the Heritage File, and will use the old postcard for the illustration in the book, but if you want them back we will return them. Let me know which is preferred.

Thanks for your help!
Yours truly,
Allen Gardiner
Libraries give knowledge for wisdom, ideas for innovation, and inspiration for freedom.
WELLINGTON
EARLY LIBRARY HISTORY

The first library was opened by a lawyer named William Black in 1884-85, a small lending library. In 1895, Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson and W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and the various societies took turns operating it. In 1898 the Prentis Study Club was organized and named for Mrs. Noble Prentis, of Topeka, wife of a widely known Kansas writer and historian, who was herself a leader in the Women's Federated Club movement. In 1899 Mrs. Prentis came to visit the club named after her and suggested that the young ladies find some worthwhile project to work on; thus was born the idea of a library for Wellington.

On New Year's Day, 1900, a big reception was held. The gentlemen were invited to attend, the price of admission being a book in place of the customary card.
About 200 books were obtained in this manner. The library was opened in the back of a shoe store and later to the bank building on Seventh Street.

When the new city hall was being built the club women were promised two rooms on the second floor, one to be used for the library. The Prentis Study Club members asked the mayor to arrange for the city to take over the library. The Wellington Library Association, with a capital stock of $5,000 sold at $1.00 per share was set up. The Women's Federation donated $1,200 for furnishings. In March, 1908, it was determined to incorporate the library under the state law relating to public libraries, but it was voted to maintain the name Prentis Library.

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY

On April 1,1914, at the spring election the voters approved the support of a public library by a vote of 3-1. In May, 1914, the new Wellington City Library board held its first meeting and voted to begin the process of erecting a library building. On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long-Bell Lumber Co. at the corner of Seventh Street and Jefferson Avenue for $3,500.00. The board had begun negotiations with Andrew Carnegie, and on April 19, 1915, the Carnegie Corporation stated that it would give $17,500 for a library building.

The name of the architect has been lost but the contract was awarded to J. H. Mitchell. The building was completed in December, 1915, but remained vacant for sometime due to a delay in receipt of the new furniture for the building. Meanwhile Miss Flower and Miss Hackney, the librarians, cataloged books. The library building was accepted from the contractor on June 12, 1916, was dedicated June 19, 1916, and was informally opened to the public July 1, 1916. (The new furniture had still not been received.)

DESCRIPTION OF THE BUILDING

a one-story structure on a raised basement The building is rectangular in a classical style. The exterior is of gray tapestry brick with trimmings of Bedford and Carthage limestone. The roof is of red Spanish tile. Stone columns frame the front door on either side.
Surmounted above them, on the entablature are the words "Carnegie Library" in high relief. The portico boasts an elaborate cornice.

LATER LIBRARY HISTORY

The library now owns 39,500 volumes and serves a population of 8,200. 78,478
items were circulated in 1984. The 1985 budget is $93,000. The library is a member of the South Central Kansas Library System.
WELLINGTON
LIBRARIANS
Miss Maude Barrett 1900 - 1902
Miss Katherine Hackney 1907 - 1916*
Gretchen Flower May 1916 - 1918
Lottie Ingram Aug 1918 - 1919
Miss Katherine Hackney Nov 1919 - Apr 1924
Miss Jeanne Flower Aug 1924 - Aug 1925
Mrs. H. Lucy Nichols Sep 1925 - 1929
Miss Marie Rowland 1929 - 1931
Miss Florence Williams Dec 1931 - 1940
Mrs. Ruth Merryman
[later Mrs. George Hepler] 1940 - 1946
Miss Ruth Warnock 1946 - 1948
Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey 1949 - 1958
Mrs. Fred (Olive B.) McCoy 1958 - 1971
Mrs. Leroy (Betty J.) McGaughey 1971 -
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Dey, Dorothy, "The Wellington Public Library," n.d. [Unpublished paper]
Handbook of Kansas Libraries, 1902.
Kansas Library Bulletin (various issues).
McCoy, Olive B., "History of Wellington Public Library Revealed,"
The Wellington Daily News, April 12, 1962.
Topeka Capital, Topeka, Kansas, May 27, 1916.
The Wellington Daily News, Aug. 23, 1971.

The early records are confusing as to who was librarian. The Wellington Daily News on July 1, 1916, spoke of Miss Flower and Miss Hackney cataloging the books, and on August 12 that year reported that Miss Flower had accepted a position in Wisconsin. Miss Kate Hackney was to continue as assistant librarian but a search was underway for a new librarian. The Dey history states that Miss Gretchen Friend, a librarian at [the then] Emporia Teacher's College, was hired to organize the new library but returned to Emporia in September and management of the library was turned over to Miss Hackney; Friend apparently remained an official library consultant while Hackney was listed as librarian. In 1918-1919 Lottie Ingram was listed as librarian while Kate Hackney actually "ran" the library.
'Storyline' now available
March 5, 1987 Wellington News
CUDDLES THE BEAR has arrived at the Wellington Public Library. Beginning today, the library is offering a new service to the youngsters of Wellington. "Storyline” is for children to use in calling Cuddles the Story Bear. By dialing 6-BEAR (6-2327) they can hear Cuddles tell a story three to four minutes long. The stories will be changer weekly. This service is being made possible by the members of St. Jude’s Episcopal Church, whose pastor is Father James Liggett. The congregation purchased the necessary answering machine for the library to commemorate the tenth anniversary here in Wellington. Mama Bear, who is actually Barbara Gaskill, the children's librarian, is in charge of this service and would like to invite persons to call Cuddles and cuddle up with a good story. This week's story is "The Little Red Hen." Pictured below are Gaskill (seated); Jackie Slack, a member of St. Jude’s; Fr. Ligget Betty Bean, president of the library board; Ed Mohney, senior warden of St. Jude’s and Jack Prilliman, librarian.
(Photo by Janet Johnson)
$2,000 donated to library Sept 17, 1987 Wellington News
ELEANOR SLATEN WALD, center, of Albuquerque, N.M. presents a $2,000 check to Greg Renn, chairman of the library board. Also shown is Jack Prilliman, librarian at the Wellington Public Library. The money will be applied to the fund to renovate part of the present facility and construct a new addition. Wald's grandmother, Ellen R. Ross Clayton, was a trustee on the library board in 1916 when the new Carnegie Library was dedicated.
........... (Photo by Janet Johnson)
Page 2 Mar 25, 1987_____
The Library Corner
By Jack Prilliman, Librarian_______
The Kansas Historic Sites Board of Review approved the nomination of the Wellington Public Library to the National Register of Historic Places. Any building in Kansas that is nominated for the National Register is automatically put on the Register of Historic Kansas Places.
The National Register of Historic Places is the Federal Government’s official list of historic properties worthy of preservation. Listing on the National Register provides recognition of the community’s historic importance and assures protective review of Federal projects that might adversely affect the character of the historic property.
Since 1981, the Kansas Historic Preservation Act (K.H.A. 75:2715-75:2725) has provided a strengthened review mechanism for projects undertaken by the state or any political subdivision of the state which affect properties listed on the National and Kansas registers of historic places.
The Wellington Public Library was nominated as part of a thematic nomination that includes all other eligible Kansas Carnegie Libraries. The Kansas Historic Sites Board of Review met on Feb. 21 in Topeka and reviewed each library individually. The Carnegie Libraries in Kansas (built between 1900 and 1917) are located throughout the state, with the greatest concentration being in the south-east. Many of the libraries constructed between 1900 and 1910 are expensive examples of the Beaux Arts style, with little focus on floor plan and space efficiency.
The libraries constructed after 1910 (Wellington Public Library was built in 1915) exhibit staid Neo-Classical facades and high space utilization, including full basements. None of the libraries are particularly large and many of the libraries are facing serious space shortages, increasing the possibility that insensitive additions will mar the character of the library buildings, or that the libraries will be torn down.
Most of the libraries stand very near to the central business districts in the towns and cities that they serve. Insensitive changes to their exterior in particular would completely alter the characteristics that these familiar landmarks embody. The interiors of many of the libraries have already been altered, beamed ceilings have been covered with acoustic tiles and the original varnished woodwork has been painted. Other changes, such as the replacement of windows, doors and staircases have occurred. In general, the nominated libraries maintain their original floor-plans and their original detailing, maintaining a high degree of structural and architectural integrity.
How will this nomination affect the Wellington Public Library’s LSCA Grant application and planned addition? Very little. The Library Board of Trustees selected an architectural firm noted for working with historic buildings.
This is why the new addition is designed to more or less stand alone while still being attached to the existing building. In this way the exterior of our present building remains the same as it was when it opened in June, 1916. The only changes being the addition of new entry doors and storm windows.
Both the Library Board and the architects have been aware of the pending nomination. Part of the mandatory procedures in filling out the grant was the notification of the State Historical Society. The planned addition shows great sensitivity to existing architecture and is designed to compliment our library.
Many other fine examples of early architecture; the Park House, some of the older buildings along Washington Street, the auditorium, the excellent museum and the many fine old homes make Wellington a city with a past - a past of which it can be proud.
These landmarks, along with fine schools and recreational facilities, make Wellington competitive for new industry and an attractive place for
Wellington News WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th, 1985
Library to celebrate birthday of Pioneer Andrew Carnegie

A celebration awaits you on Tuesday, Nov. 26 at the Wellington Public Library. The Library will mark the 150th birthday of Andrew Carnegie, steel industry pioneer and the man who built 1,681 free libraries across America.
The library will commemorate Andrew’s birthday in style. The Wellington Senior High Band will start the celebration at 8:15 with a short concert on the library lawn (weather permitting.)
During the day, refreshments will be served by the librarians in the children’s and adult departments. While visiting the library, every one
is invited to sign up for a book which will be given away at the close of the day. The beautiful book “Return to Kansas” by Hamill for the adults and an activity book for the children will be given away.
The librarians are asking the area residents to write a letter to the library telling how the Wellington Public Library has been an influence on their lives.
Betty McGaughey librarian, said, “We hope the entire community will help us salute Andrew Carnegie’s determination to bring the wonder of books to all citizens of this nation by joining in the birthday festivities.
he said. Painting problems were encountered, carpeting did not match and many other details held the constant attention of the library board, he said.
The project did stay within its budget for contingency items, a fact with which the board is more than pleased. The period the public was without access to the library was also kept to a minimum, he said.
“The staff should be commended for handling not one but two moves in interim facilities so smoothly,” he said.
said he has seen the inside of the building so many times he has nearly become numb to its impact.
“It’s like walking into home,” he said.
But impact it will.
“In the end the project speaks well,” Pfalzgraf said.
The building is listed as a historic building and all construction had to meet state approval. The building can be remodeled but the flavor of the 1916 era must be maintained, he said.
Local records do not reflect the
colors popular at the time of original construction — cream walls with Kelly green accents.
Crown molding on the ceiling near the entrance shines through a light coat of paint. However, markings on other ceilings show that at one point in the past 78 years moldings were removed in places. Wall shelves were saved and railings on the new stairways look an identical match to the original staircase. Other records do not reflect what lighting was originally used, so the
were long since replaced.
Pfalzgraf said the board worked to retain the aesthetic qualities of 1916, and yet make the library functional in 1994 and for years beyond. The building was heavily wired in anticipation of computer expansion. All heat and cooling is zoned for efficiency and the handicap accessibility is “state of the art.”
Also added is a meeting room which will house the children’s reading program and provide needed privacy for literacy tutoring, Pfalzgraf said. The room is also expected to
Library has history of public support
by Linda Stinnett

The dream of a library started long before Wellington achieved the dream of a Carnegie library — and from the start the dreams have been followed by outstanding community support.
According to “From the Carnegie Legacy in Kansas,” by Allen Gardiner in 1985, the first library in Wellington opened in 1984-85. A lawyer named William Black, opened the community s first library at that time, a small lending library.
Ten years later, Katie Sniggs, Lula Frantz-Whiteson and W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and various societies took turns operating it, Gardiner reports. In 1898, the Prentis Study Club was organized and after the widely-known Kansas writer and historian it was named after, Mrs. Noble Prentis of Topeka, visited the club in 1899, she suggested the members find a worthwhile project to work on. They followed through with the idea of a library for Wellington.
A reception was held New Year’s Day 1900 and gentlemen in the community were invited to attend. The price of admission was a book - in place of the customary card of the time — and nearly 200 books were obtained. The library soon opened in the back of a shoe store and later moved to the bank building on Seventh Street.
Community funding of the library became an established tradition and was followed when the new city hall was built and two rooms on the second floor were promised to the club women. The club members asked the mayor to arrange for the
city to take over the library, Gardiner’s book says.
The Wellington Library Association, with a capital stock of $5,000 sold at $1 per share, was set up. The Women’s Federation donated $1,200 for furnishings and in March 1908 it was determined to incorporate the library under state law relating to public libraries. The club voted, though, to maintain the name Prentis Library.
In an expanding community, city voters gave 3-1 approval on April 1, 1914 to support a public library. In May the City Library Board held its first meeting and voted to begin the process of erecting a library building. On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long-Bell Lumber Co. at the corner of Seventh and Jefferson for $3,500, Gardiner said.
Within 10 days, the Carnegie Corporation stated it would give $17,500 for a library building. A building contract was awarded to J.H. Mitchell and the original building was completed in December 1915.
Ironically, there was a delay in opening due when new furniture did not arrive. Several pieces of new furniture already ordered for Wellington’s library will not arrive in time for the open house Saturday, Doug Pfalzgraf, board member, said.
The building was accepted from the contractor on June 12, 1916. It was dedicated June 19 and informally opened to the public July 1, Gardiner reports. At that point, the new furniture still had not arrived, he said.
In 1985, the Wellington Library Board of
Trustees began studying renovation and expansion needs of the Carnegie building, Pfalzgraf said. Nearly $200,000 was raised from private sources and in 1988 ground was broken to construct an exterior shell addition to the building.
Fund-raising began again, with nearly $256,000 raised from 1,816 private donations; $94,000 in grants from the state; and $150,000 in city tax dollars to go toward the renovation. Phase II of the project began in June 1993 and the dedication of the remodeled facility will be Saturday.
Exterior mortar repairs, landscaping and other work will be on-going, he said.
% sj« jfc
Librarians
Miss Maude Barrett, 1900-1902 Miss Katherine Hackney, 1907-1916 Miss Gretchen Flower May, 1916-1918 Lottie Ingram, Aug. 1918-1919 Miss Katherine Hackney, Nov. 1919-April 1924
Miss Jeanne Flower, Aug. 1924-Aug. 1925 Mrs. H. Lucy Nichols, Sept. 1925-1929 Miss Marie Rowland, 1929-1931 Miss Florence Williams, Dec. 1931-1940 Mrs. Ruth Merryman
(later Mrs. George Hepler), 1940-1946 Miss Ruth Warnock, 1946-1948 Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey, 1949-1958 Mrs. Fred (Olive B.) McCoy, 1958-1971 Mrs. Leroy (Betty J.) McGaughey, 1971-1986 Jack Prilliman, 1986-present
At present no new volumes are being added to the library's collec-tion, but readers will feel as if it has grown, he said. Under the old, cramped conditions many times books
were kept in storage unless requested. Now an increase of 40 percent in shelving space will allow patrons easier access to books.
“To that end we have more books,” said.
Staff members also have more and improved space in which to work, the librarian’s space to the right of the front entrance is all new furni-ture, designed with the 1916 flavor, j said.
The expansion and renovation came at very little cost to taxpayers, Pfalzgraf noted. The City of Welling-
child. He said he felt teaching children responsibility is commendable.
“But, hey, stop him/her from viewing television, don't forbid the reading of good books,” he said.
Fresh Start will only happen once. Books being check out starting the first day the library is open will be subject to fines and lost book fees, he said.
So, anyone denied the privilege of checking out books because of old fines or lost book fees, come back.
“We’ve missed you,” Prilliman said. “It’s a new beginning.”
Take advantage of it, but don’t abuse charging privileges.
“We want to loan you books, but we also want them back so someone else can borrow them,” he said.
Harvesting continues at a rapid pace
From Bev Hitt of the Department Of Human
Resources:
Despite
cloudy skies and cooler tempera-tures, harvest continued at a rapid pace in
Sumner and Harper counties yesterday.
Elevators reporting in the Wellington general area received over 1.5 million bushels with moisture running from 11-14 percent and test weights from 56-61 pounds. Percentage of wheat harvested ranges from 50 percent in northwest Sumner County to around 60 percent immediately south of Wellington. However, there are also fields still ripening in both Sumner and Cowley counties. Cutting won’t begin in those
fields until next week.
The Anthony area is estimated at 45-50 percent harvested with elevators including the Kiowa area taking in 1.3 million bushels yesterdays. Wheat is testing dry with weights between 58-62 pounds.
The area near Caldwell and the Oklahoma border reports 40-45 percent cut. Elevators received approximately 250,000 bushels with moisture from 12-13 percent and test weights holding at 58-60 pounds.
Workers and machines are in balance in the Wellington and Caldwell areas, however, Anthony is still in need of truck drivers with commercials driver’s licenses.
For more harvest information, contact Sam Beam in Anthony at 842-5202, Betsy Luder in Caldwell at 845-2455 or Cleo Seimers in Wellington at 326-7662.
12-17-29
LANDSCAPING AT
LIBRARY GROUNDS

Work Is Nearly Completed; Public Invited To Inspect Shrubs
Landscaping of the Wellington Public Library grounds has been practically completed and with the evergreens looming around the foundation and two of the sides of the plot of ground, a sort of a Christmas air is evident. The foundation planting has been made in the front part of the building. Various plants have been placed on either side of the steps leading to the buildings and both sides are identical, as to the size of the plants and the kinds.
Dwarf junipers, Arborvitas and Japanese juniper are outstanding in the foundation planting. These plants will never grow to a height where they will cover the window or interfere with the light of the basement from the sides of building. All of the plants of a different shade and the scheme is extraordinary.
Several hundred tulip plants have been planted, the colors of which were selected to correspond with the shrubbery of the founda- tion plants. In addition peren- nial flax plants are placed among the tulip bed and will bloom with the tulips in the spring. The blos- som will be of blue color.
On the east side of the grounds and on the north side, evergreen hedges are planted. They will be allowed to grow six or seven feet high before they are trimmed.
The purpose is to let the greenery grow to a height sufficient to off- set the flatness of the city build- ings.
In the northeast corner of the lot a flower bed is planned, in which there will be many differ- ent plowers will be planted. The hedges on either side will grow into the bed, thus offsetting the abrupt stop of the hedge.
The public is invited to inspect
the plants and the way in which they are set in the ground,
its

153
WELLINGTON
EARLY LIBRARY HISTORY

The first library was opened by a lawyer named William Black in 1884-85, a small lending library. In 1895, Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson and W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and the various societies took turns operating it. In 1898, the Prentis Study Club was organized and named for Mrs. Noble Prentis, of Topeka, wife of a widely known Kansas writer and historian, who was herself a leader in the Women's Federated Club movement. In 1899, Mrs. Prentis came to visit the club named after her and suggested that the young ladies find some worthwhile project to work on; thus was born the idea of a library for Wellington.
On New Year's Day, 1900, a big reception was held. The gentlemen were invited to attend, the price of admission being a book in place of the customary card. About 200 books were obtained in this manner. The library was opened in the back of a shoe store and later moved to the bank building on Seventh Street.
When the new city hall was being built the club women were promised two rooms on the second floor, one to be used for the library. The Prentis Study Club members asked the mayor to arrange for the city to take over the library. The Wellington Library Association, with a capital stock of $5,000.00 sold at $1.00 per share, was set up. The Women's Federation donated $1,200.00 for furnishings. In March, 1908, it was determined to incorporate the library under the state law relating to public libraries, but it was voted to maintain the name Prentis Library.
THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY
On April 1, 1914, at the spring election the voters approved the
support of a public library by a vote of 3-1. In May, 1914, the Wellington City Library board held its first meeting and voted to begin the process of erecting a library building. On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long-Bell Lumber Co. at the corner of Seventh Street and Jefferson Avenue for $3,500.00. The board had begun negotiations with Andrew Carnegie, and on April 19, 1915, the Carnegie Corporation stated that it would give $17,500.00 for a library building.
The name of the architect has been lost but the contract was awarded to J. H. Mitchell. The building was completed in December, 1915, but remained vacant for sometime due to a delay in receipt of the new furniture. Meanwhile, Miss Flower and Miss Hackney, the librarians, cataloged books. The library building was accepted from the contractor on June 12, 1916, was dedicated June 19, 1916, and was informally opened to the public July 1, 1916. (The new furniture had still not been received.)
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DESCRIPTION OF THE BUILDING
The building is rectangular, one story above a raised basement, in a classical style. The exterior is of gray tapestry brick with trimmings of Bedford and Carthage limestone. The roof is of red Spanish tile. Stone columns frame the front door on either side. Surmounted above them, on the entablature, are the words "Carnegie Library" in high relief. The portico boasts an elaborate cornice.
LATER LIBRARY HISTORY
The library owns 39,500 volumes and serves a population of 8,200. 78,500 items were circulated in 1984. The 1985 budget is $93,000.00. The library is a member of the South Central Kansas Library System.
LIBRARIANS
Miss Maude Barrett 1900 - 1902
Miss Katherine Hackney 1907 - 1916*
Miss Gretchen Flower May 1916 - 1918
Lottie Ingram Aug 1918 - 1919
Miss Katherine Hackney Nov 1919 - Apr 1924
Miss Jeanne Flower Aug 1924 - Aug 1925
Mrs. H. Lucy Nichols Sep 1925 - 1929
Miss Marie Rowland 1929 - 1931
Miss Florence Williams Dec 1931 - 1940
Mrs. Ruth Merryman
[later Mrs. George Hepler] 1940 - 1946
Miss Ruth Warnock 1946 - 1948
Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey 1949 - 1958
Mrs. Fred (Olive B.) McCoy 1958 - 1971
Mrs. Leroy (Betty J.) McGaughey 1971 -
Jack Prilliman 1986 1995
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Dey, Dorothy, "The Wellington Public Library," n.d.
Handbook of Kansas Libraries, 1902.
Kansas State Library. Kansas Library Bulletin (various issues).
McCoy, Olive B., "History of Wellington Public Library Revealed," The Wellington Daily News, April 12, 1962.
Topeka Capital, Topeka, Kansas, May 27, 1916.
The Wellington Daily News, Wellington, Kansas, Aug. 23, 1971.
*The early records are confusing as to the librarians. The Wellington Daily News on July 1, 1916, spoke of Miss Flower and Miss Hackney cataloging the books, and on August 12 of that year reported that Miss Flower had accepted a position in Wisconsin; Miss Hackney was to continue as assistant librarian. The Dey history states that Miss Gretchen Friend, a librarian at [the then] Emporia Teacher's College, was hired to organize the new library but returned to Emporia in September and management of the library was turned over to Miss Hackney; Friend apparently remained an official 1ibrary consultant while Hackney was listed as librarian. In 1918-1919 Lottie Ingram was listed as librarian while Kate Hackney actually "ran" the library.
The Wellington Daily News
Page 4------------------ Lifestyles --------------------------------—
McNeil honored for service
Donna McNeil was recognized for 10 years of service at the Library by the Friends of the Library Monday, May 10. Pictured are, from left, Library Board President Jan Brody, McNeil, Friends Vice President Alicea Deschner,
Friends Treasurer Robert Morris and Friends President Dolores B. Carr.
Photo by Christie Dillmon
City hears report on Harvey Street bridge, library addition
The City Council last night discussed plans for reconstruction of the Harvey Street Bridge and heard a progress report on the new addition at the Wellington City Library.
A motion was approved by Coun- cilman Neil Young that city staff proceed with financing arrangemen- ts and advertising for bids so the work could begin as soon as possible.
The bridge was closed last May due to structural weaknesses discovered during a routine inspection and Young said that it has created an inconvenience for residents in the area, a couple of businesses and the golf course.
Gary Shofner, an engineer for Cook, Flat and Strobel, briefly described plans for constructing a rigid-frame bridge that would enhan- ce waterflow capabilities in the Rock Island slough.
He said the structure was designed to parallel the slough with a 45-foot opening that would accommodate a “25-year flood-frequency storm” without flooding. His preliminary cost estimate for the entire project which includes the bridge, sewer work, guttering and approaches, totaled $267,700.
Shofner said that if the process advertising for bids was initiated promptly then a contract for the work could be awarded before March 1. The job would require between 75 and 90 construction days to complete.
City Manager A.B. Preston said the project would be mainly funded by issuing temporary notes that would be payable in four years.
Progress report on library heard
The Library Board has had to deal with several problems lately concerning construction of the new addition, according to one of the board members, but everything is under control and fundraising efforts will continue as usual.
Doug Pfalzgraf explained that construction on the new addition began in April of 1988 but last May it was determined that the general contractor was not paying the subcontractors. So in July the bonding company, which guaranteed the performance of the contractor, agreed to take over and see that the job was finished.
Since then he said the board identified 29 problems on a “punch list” which have all been either solved or
attended to.
The latest problem involves cracking in some of the exterior block veneer which was noticed after it had been waterproofed. Pfalzgraf said that it appeared the blocks began to crack from shrinkage as they dried out. Architect Dave Burke said it was apparent that the blocks were not properly cured and should be removed and replaced.
According to Pfalzgraf, the com-pany that sold them the blocks and the bonding company will be making a determination and decide on how to correct the problem. He said that the problem was “merely cosmetic” and did not affect the structural integrity of the building.
“Obviously the library board is fir- mly committed to bringing you a first-rate building,” Pfalzgraf said. “The people that have been so good to donate to us deserve a first-rate building and that’s why we are taking such a firm and hard position as it relates to this block veneer.”
The purpose of the library project is to create handicap accessibility to the existing library structure and to provide additional space, The project plans call for three phases. The project is currently in the first phase which includes $192,800 for an addition that includes
finished exterior and unfinished in- terior. Pfalzgraf said the funds for this portion were raised from donations, grants and accumulated savings.
The second phase will be to finish the interior. The third phase, which is optional, will include landscaping and some exterior work to the existing structure.
Water plant, turbine problems discussed
The council viewed a videotape of a large crack in the basement of the Water Production Plant that forced a shutdown last Thursday.
Director of Engineering Charles Soules said the crack was in the basement wall between the filters and the basement. The leak amounts to about 100,000 gallons a day and he said it must be leaking through the floor because it is not staying in the basement. This could cause considerable damage to the foundation.
“At best all we can do is patch the crack for a while and then do it again,” Soules said. “This problem could be a considerable expense and could keep the plant closed for
several months.”
While the plant is closed water is being routed through the well system. The question facing the council will be whether to temporarily patch up the problems at the water plant and make plans to con struct a new one with the lake project or to completely refurbish the current structure.
“We don’t know whether patching it will be good for six days or six years,” Preston said.
Preston said that when extensive repair was done in 1970 it was deter mined that a new plant should be built by 2000. He said the equipment in the plant that is still operable could be transferred to a new building.
Meanwhile, Mayor Gordon Tacket said that employees at Wolcott and Lincoln were startled Friday mor ning by what they thought was an ex plosion at the new 20 megawatt quick-start gas turbine followed by a loud noise sounding like air escaping.
Don McCracken, power plant chief engineer, said that an air leak on the high-pressure gas filter on the south side had caused the relief valve to blow which allows 250 to 400 pound of gas to vent off into the at mosphere.
“We shut off the main gas valve since we are requested not to use the unit until the grounding situation is resolved,” he said.
The “grounding situation” Mc Cracken refers to is an electrics problem which won’t allow the gas turbine to operate unless it is either tied into the city’s steam plan KG&E or both.
McCracken said that the sub-zero temperatures have also created another problem with freezing of air lines and other equipment.
“It seems that no thought was given to sub-zero temperatures by the engineering firm, the turbine ei closer was down in the 20s and the control room was down to degrees,” McCracken said.
New lights at Sellers Park
The city will join with the school district to purchase new lights at Sellers Park at a total cost of $32,37 according to Rod Conwell, director public works.
In a prepared statement Conwell said that the school district will make payments of $3,506.99 for three (Continued on page 14)
Library Position Open
Wellington News Jan 17, 1986
Director of Wellington, Kansas, Public Library, serving approximately 8,500 patrons with 40,000 volumes. Primary responsibilities include budgeting, supervisor of 3-5 library personnel, collection development and working with the public. Salary will depend upon qualifications. Degree from a ALA accredited library school or at least five (5) years library experience required. Position available March 15, 1986. Submit letter of application and resume’ to Search Committee, Wellington Public Library, 121 West 7th, Wellington, Kansas 67152. Affirmative Action-Equal Opportunity Employer.
Wellington TUESDAY, JUNE 24,1986
The Library Corner
EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the first of what will be a regular series of columns written the local librarian concerning current events at the Wellington Public Library. The objective will be to inform the public of what is available and the library's plans for the future.
By Jack Prilliman Librarian
We at the library, certainly encourage and welcome public responses, suggestions and criticism. This is your library. Its existence depends on tax dollars and we want to make sure that we are providing the services that meet the needs of the majority of those we serve.
It’s hard to believe that I have been here going on three months. It seems more like three weeks. I have learned a lot during this time and I would like to share some of what I have learned about your library with you.
It’s obvious that the library has been very capably managed during the tenure of my predecessor, Betty McGaughey. I have learned from the Annual Report that she submitted to the City Council at the end of 1985, that we had 3,877 patrons registered to borrow books from the library (borrowers are kept current by an ongoing weeding process.) Of those registered, 854 are considered to be living outside of the City.
Excluding the rural users, 37 percent of Wellington’s population (8,212) are currently registered to borrow books from the library. This is an impressive figure. In the library profession, 17 percent of the local population using the library is considered above average.
I also learned that 62,953 books were circulated in 1985. Again, allowing for those that might have been borrowed by rural patrons, there were seven books circulated for each man, woman and child residing in Wellington.
The library shelves hold 39,782 volumes and the library subscribes to 95 periodicals and eight newspapers.
The Trustees who have served on the board over the years have been leaders who have developed strong policies and met the challenge that all
library boards have to face sooner of later-that of the need for more space. Book collections multiply quickly, even with good weeding policies.
The present board members are now faced once again with finding additional space. They are also seeking to make the library accessible to the handicapped and older patrons. They are coping with these problems while also trying to maintain the integrity of the architecture of the Carnegie building. It is one of 31 of the original 59 that were built in Kansas and is still in use as a library.
Four full-time staff members, Barbara Gaskill, Mary Erker, Ramona McDaniel and myself keep the library open 58 1/2 hours a week (53 1/2 in the summer). We are fortunate to also have a college student, Debbie Porter, helping out this summer.
The library is governed by a board of trustees, made up of Betty Bean -chairman, Doug Pfalzgraf - vice chairman, Louise Leslie - secretary, David Carr - treasurer, Loretta Anderson, Kenneth Jones and Kaye Hampton and ex officio member, Mayor Richard Le-Juerrne.
Future columns will deal with specific library programs, book selection, future plans, book reviews and how you can become involved in the library.
I have confidence in the future of Wellington. It’s a great place. I’m proud and pleased to have been given the chance to see that the public library will continue to be a vital part of its growth.
WELLINGTON DAILY NEWS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1987
The Library Corner
_________By Jack Prilliman________
It has been quite some time since I wrote my last column. I enjoy writing about the library and I’ve missed not doing it. The past several weeks have been busy ones. Closing out the year means filing a lot of reports with various agencies. I have also been working with the Board of Trustees on a Library Services and Construction Act, Title II grant application.
In this column I’d like to discuss the reasons why the Board of Trustees has applied for a federal grant at this time. Title II of LSCA provides federal matching grants for the construction and/or renovation of public libraries. The act became law in 1965. Twenty-seven Kansas cities and towns used Title II funds to help construct new libraries, make additions or remodel their old libraries before funds dried up in 1972. Funding have been sporadic since then. Fortunately funds have been available for the past three years despite zero recommended funding.
Each state is given a certain amount of money to be allocated among various libraries who have filed applications with the State Library. This past year construction grants totaling $261,268 were awarded to eight libraries in Kansas. The largest single amount was $134,366 matched by $147,915 in local funds out in St. Francis. Other libraries receiving funds but in lesser amounts were Russell, Minneola, Louisburg, Hays, Eudora,
El Dorado and Baxter Springs.
The Kansas State Library is optimistic about funding again this year. The total amount of money available will probably be about the same as last year. Applications were asked for and will be reviewed sometime in April. Amounts granted by the LSCA Advisory Council are based on need, local support and the total number of applications received.
We have written before in this column about the problem older and handicapped citizens have in getting into the Wellington Public Library. The entry is impressive but the steps are a formidable barrier to many. Putting in an elevator in the existing building would take up precious space in an already overcrowded library. Using Minimum Standards for Small Public Libraries as a guide, we already have over 40,000 volumes crowded onto shelving that should only hold 30,000 books.
In addition to the two major problems just listed lets talk some about those that exist but are not quite as obvious or visible to you when driving by or visiting the library. The heating system dates back to when the library was built in 1915. It has been converted to a gas fired boiler. The asbestos covering has begun to peel and slake away. The furnace is not very fuel efficient. Windows in the children’s library on the lower level must be opened in order to maintain a comfortable
temperature on the main or upper level. The premium for boiler insurance continues to go up and is getting more difficult to find each year.
We are using two air conditioner units. A window unit cools the children’s library and a large free standing unit that hides the card catalog partially cools the upper level. It is necessary to use several electric fans to help cool the main level.
We work with a maze of electrical extension cords running from far too few outlets. The many multiple outlet plug-ins and extension cords create a hazard for both staff and patrons. It surely overburdens the present wiring system.
The antiquated rest rooms are not easily accessible to the public. They are in the basement and, again, stairs must be climbed. They serve their basic function but are unattractive and there is no hot water available.
Every bit of space in the library has been put to use. There simply is no more room for storage. Back issues of periodicals and newspapers are crammed into storerooms. I’m sure that the planners of the library back in 1915 planned for growth over the next 25 years. However, it is now 70 years since the library opened in June 1916 with about 5,000 volumes. They could not have foreseen the tremendous number of books that now come from publishers each year. It would be like our second-guessing the informational needs of Wellington in 2057.
The members of the Wellington Public Library Board of Trustees have certainly been aware of these problems as they have developed over the years. Many excellent people have served on the Board over the past 20 years — when the access and overcrowding problems have become acute. They have studied the problem thoroughly. Temporary measures were considered and rejected (as well they should) as not solving the long-term problems.
The present Board members, some who have served eight and 10 years, decided some time ago that the time had come to act. Last summer an architect knowledgeable in working with historic building was employed to do an evaluation and make some recommendations. The architectural firm of Breidenthal, Burk and Ehnen studied the structural soundness of the present building, did an analysis of how the existing space was used and made projections of future use. Late this past fall they presented the Board with their findings and three alternative plans.
The plans were studied carefully. The Board started meeting almost weekly for two months carefully making their decision. They chose to build an addition to the north side of the library and to renovate the existing facility at the same time. The addition will be approximately one-half the size of the present building and will allow for a street level entrance from Jefferson with an elevator in the entry way for those
needing it to reach the upper or main level. There will be room for expansion of the collection to 50,000 volumes and should adequately serve the needs of Wellington for the next quarter of a century.
The total cost of the proposed project is $425,000. Through judicious
investment of library booksale and , gift monies the library has $100,000 on hand for the project. The grant request is for $170,000. If the grant application is funded in full ($170,000) an additional $155,000 will have to be raised locally either through donations and/or a bond issue.
The Board of Trustees took their proposed plan to the City Council on Jan. 20. The council approved of the submission of the application and a resolution of support has been prepared.
This has been a courageous and noble decision that the Board members have made. They reviewed
the ramifications of going to the people for funds with the economy at such a low point. They weighed the benefits to Wellington that the ex- panded library would provide and are confident that the expanded library would provide and are confident that the citizens of Wellington are also looking to the future. A future that will see the library as a center equipped and ready to serve the educational, cultural and recreational needs of the community.
We have experienced good and bad economic times in the past and we surely will in the future. There is really no ideal time to raise money. The goal of the Library Board is to have a library ready to serve the needs of not just our own generation but for those generations of Wellingtonians to come. Look to the future and be prepared for it. If you are willing to do your part either through financial help or forming a Friends of the Wellington Library group let one of the Board members know.
If we all work together we can make the Wellington Public Library a vital part of the community. It has a long history of determination to succeed, come and be a part of its future.
Wellingtton News Nov 23 1988
Page 7____________________________________________________________________
Chisholm Trail Museum Board to honor Dorthea Miller

Dorothea Miller has given 22 years of volunteer service to Wellington’s Chisholm Trail Museum, 17 of those years as director.
Following her resignation in September and in recognition of her undying dedication, the board of directors of the museum will honor Mrs. Miller with a reception on Dec. 4 from 2-4 p.m. at the museum.
Dorthea Miller
“Mrs. Miller is an outstanding individual in volunteer time,” said Alda Boyd, a museum board member. “If each individual would select just one area to give of their time, our local projects and organizations would benefit
greatly.”
Mrs. Miller has belonged to several community organizations and is currently a member of the Soroptimist Club and Inter Nos.
Awards and certificates overflow in Mrs. Miller’s scrapbooks and on her walls, said Mrs. Boyd. She was selected as Wellington’s Distinguished Service Award recipient in 1980. She was also chosen as one of 500 personalities of the world honored for exceptional contribution to the community and was named to the 1987 Personalities of the Americas.
She attended the Newton Public Schools and graduated in 1926 with an A.B. degree from Southwestern College in Winfield. It was at her alma mater that she was later employed as head librarian. She spent three years as reference librarian at Wichita State University and also taught school for seven years.
In 1948, she married Floyd Miller. They have four sons.
Mrs. Miller said that the musuem has been “dear” to her.
“I thoroughly enjoyed a part in making this historical and educational project a success,” Mrs. Miller said.
The four-story building with its 42 rooms of displays, a library of archives, is a constant challenge to keep an “old lady” active and thinking, using every ounce of talent and resource that I possess, she said.
This year, Mrs. Miller received an appreciation certificate from Gov. Mike Hayden and also a birthday card from President and Mrs. Ronald Reagan.
Sept 23, 1986, Wellington News The Library Corner
By Jack Prilliman

There is hardly a day goes by without someone using our microfilm collection. Sometimes a person just wants to look at the old advertisements, or else research an historical event. However, the majority of people are looking for obituaries. This past summer we’ve had people from California, Arizona, Texas, Illinois and Ohio who spent many hours at the readers searching for information about relatives.
We also receive requests through the mail, including one from Riyadh, Saudia Arabia (which we were able to fill). We can only fill mail requests if specific dates are given. We simply don’t have the staff time to do extensive researches.
In addition to the Wellington Daily News, which we have on microfilm from August 1902, the library owns the following: Wellington Monitor, January 1886-March 1892; Wellington Monitor Press, March 1892-December 1931; People’s Voice, September 1890-November 1917 (Wellington paper); Sumner County Press, September 1873-February 1892; Wellington Banner, September 1872-October 1872; Sumner County Democrat, April 1877-June 1881; Sumner County Standard, September 1884-February 1896; Sumner County Star, March 1895-October 1909; Wellington Vidette, May 1879-November 1879; Wellington Weekly Quidnunc, February 1887-September 1888; Wellingtonian, March 1881-October 1885; Wellington Republican, March 1886-August 1886; Belle Plaine Democrat, February 1873-September 1874; Oxford Times, June 1871-November 1871; Oklahoma War Chief, January
1883- August 1886; Industrial Age (Caldwell), July 1887-January 1889; Caldwell Post, January 1879-May 1883; Caldwell Standard, February
1884- September 1884; Caldwell* Free Press, September 1885-May 1886; Caldwell Times, June 1886-July 1887; Caldwell Weekly Advance, March
1894-December 1901; Caldwell Commercial, May 1880-May 1883; Caldwell Journal, May 1883-October 1892; People’s Press (Milan), January 1892; Milan Press, January 1892-June 1899; Milan Herald, September 1899-June 1900; Milan News, January 1911-February 1918; Milan Mirror, January 1923-March 1923.
In addition to the newspapers we have the Kansas Census of Sumner County for 1895, the U.S. Census of Sumner County for 1880, a roll of Sumner County vital statistics covering births, deaths and marriages for 1887-1911. We also have the microfilmed records kept by the Wellington Methodist church from 1875.
There has been a great amount of interest in genealogy over the past few years and it seems to be growing. People today have more leisure time to pursue their roots. For those with the time to spare, it can be both frustrating and rewarding.
If you are considering looking up your family tree and don’t really know where to start, I would like to recommend two good books owned by the library. “Know Your Ancestors; A Guide to Genealogical Research” by Ethel Williams, and “Finding Your Roots,” by Jeane Eddy Westin. Either one of these books will give you step by step instructions on how to proceed with your search.
I might add that most of our earliest relatives in Kansas came here from one of the eastern states (if not directly from Europe) and sooner or later you will need information from back there. The library can get you a microfilmed copy of the Federal Census of any county in existance all the way back to the first 1790 census taken by the Federal Government. There is a $3.50 charge for this service and the microfilm must be used in the library, however, it can remain here for two weeks before it must be returned.
If you would like to see your own local Sumner County newspaper added to our microfilmed collection, personal or memorial donations would be welcomed. They are not inexpensive. Currently, the price is around $30 a roll.
much of our present collection was acquired by gifts from Marie VanDeventer, Bud Yates, Helen Thomson and the Sumner County Historical Society.
In addition to our microfilm collection of newspapers, we have on our shelves copies of the Wellington City Directory dating back to 1884. There are some gaps, but it is fairly complete from 1906 to the present. We have the Sumner County Atlas for 1918, 1902, 1883 and 1887, and a few land ownership maps back to 1930.
So if you would like to trace your family history, the library might be a good place to start. Just be sure you have plenty of time and patience.
THE WELLINGTON DAILY NEWS
Mar 8, 1988
The Library Corner
By Jack Prilliman - Librarian

What a night it was — indeed. Those original 20 girls of the Prentis Club would have loved it. They too resorted to unusual projects to raise money for the library. They held a carnival in the new county jail and an open house where the young men of the city had to bring books in order to enter.
We were aware that we had a lot of support for our building project. Over the past year a lot of people have already given pledges or donations. However, a lot of those early supporters were our regular library users and that was a lot like asking a kid if he's in favor of ice cream. We began to find out very soon after the program started that the library meant a lot to a great number of you.
The program started taking shape several months ago. We tossed the idea around in board meetings. We even set aside a date and announced it only to postpone when it conflicted with other community programs.
The radio-telethon turned out to be a lot of fun for all of us. Even as the day grew closer and we had no firm commitment for refreshments, the word was passed to Kathy Vickers who in turn contacted some of the best cookie bakers in Sumner County. By showtime, we had enough goodies to satisfy the sweet tooth of everyone in town. We really did not get very excited (at least openly)
that Jim Lewis of Education Channel 8 is trying to contact Greg Renn and Ed Hunley for help with the station's next fund drive.
If you missed part of the show because of hopping back and forth to see what was happening with the Winter Olympics or if, heaven forbid, you missed the show, you missed the following outstanding numbers. Loretta Anderson was our talent scout and she found the very best. We started off with Hankie Holefelder’s piano students Ebony Deschaine, Kristin Doctor and Traci Anderson. They were followed by a puppet show with our own children's librarian, Barbara Gaskill and her helpers Kathy Vickers and Margie Taylor. The Methodist Church Bell Choir was simply amazing. Not a single tinkle out of place. Becky Kleiber treated us to her choral groups from Kennedy and Lincoln Elementary Schools. They were followed by the perennially popular Wellington High School Stage Band.
Students from Lana Kemp's School of Dancing bore witness to the maxim that practice makes perfect. One of her students, Rosalyn White, proved that you are never too young to start dancing. It was obvious that Thelma Coombs’ students Julie Hinshaw, Morgen Townsend and Nelson Townsend have spent many hours practicing and it certainly paid off. Three high school students demonstrated what it was like to be one of Louise Leslie’s Quiz Bowl team players. Kevin Chisham acted as moderator while Lori Burns and Steve Carothers attempted to answer questions that were related to the public library. Becky Kleiber also presented two piano students in recital — Melissa Tieszen and Megan Rutledge. Jennifer McMullin and Cara Crossman, two of Annette Lindal’s students, proved that even though the hour was late they could play some fine piano music.
Very appropriately, we wound down the evening with some fine music from the Methodist Men's Quartet followed by an exceptionally dramatic book review by Chris Hutchins.
We were asked several times how much money we hoped the radiotelethon would bring. This had been tossed around and it was decided to not set a goal. We did not allow ourselves to think about the phones not ringing.
At 10 p.m., we signed off the air with $14,256 in additional pledges or donations. We were delighted to see so many people drop by the library and share in the excitement.
Just as important as the money was the response. Those phones just wouldn't stop. It was a most joyful sound. It was not all entertainment. Our architect, Morrie Breidenthal, was here to explain what we have in mind by doing the project in three phases. First of all we will be able to provide full library service without moving out of the building while the addition is being put up. It had first been thought that we would have to relocate to a temporary location for
as much as seven months. Now the addition can be erected with a minimum of disruption. We will also assure ourselves of receiving the $50,000 federal grant.
Phase two will involve moving out of the building for about three months while the interior of our existing library (especially the lower floor) is completely gutted and rearranged. The heating, air conditioning, electrical wiring and plumbing needed jointly in both units will be installed during the second phase. It will cost about the same amount of money as the first one ($200,000).
The third phase will involve final touch-ups such as refinishing and cleaning the exterior of the existing building, tuckpointing mortar that has come loose, painting the metal cornices and possibly restoring the main entry by installing wooden doors similar to the original ones. There may be some additional landscaping where the construction will take place.
That’s just about all there is to tell about the radio-telethon that took place right here in the Wellington Public Library. A first in Kansas and possibly a first in the nation.
We applaud the talented performers. We thank the parents of those who were up later than normally allowed on a school night. Our deep appreciation to Loretta Anderson for her efforts as talent scout. To those of you who stopped by to see the action and enjoy the cookies and beverages, you were a great audience. Our appreciation to Mayor Tackett and councilmen who were able to stop by. If Ed put you on the spot, let us know. Thanks to the members of the library staff, our good friend and predecessor, Betty McGaughey, Ron Blevins, who hasn't found a problem yet that he won’t tackle. Members of the library board pitched in wherever there was something that needed doing and did it. We thank the school and the Methodist Church for the loan of equipment.
The entire thing would never have happened if it had not been for the generosity of the Mitchells in allowing us to use the television equipment and cable channel 5 or the Hundleys for the air time and the use of their equipment. Phil Brown heard us out last fall and offered encouragement and made valuable suggestions. Phil was understanding when we had to cancel out and was ready to give it a try the second time around. Ed Hundley? How on earth can you begin to thank the unflappable Ed. We never met a person so devoted to his community and its future. He has been right there with | help and support.
We would not be thanking all of these people if we didn’t consider the efforts of Feb. 23 a success. You know who really made it succeed? Of course you do — it was you, you out there watching and listening. If you had not kept those phones ringing with your pledges, you challenges and your show of support, we wouldn't be writing this.
AN.) DAILY NEWS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11,1987
The Library Corner
By Jack Prilliman
I have just finished eating my lunch in the crowded room that we use for storage, for mending, processing books and the staff lounge. It now houses our newest service, Storyline.
It was interesting and satisfying to hear the click of the tape as yet another caller dialed the magic number, 6-BEAR, and heard Cuddles, our storytelling bear, tell the children’s story of the week. After the tape ended there would be a brief whirring as the tape rewound and waited patiently for the next call. Unfortunately, we do not have the call counter working as yet. The one thing we do know for sure is that it is being well used.
One youngster called the library’s number Saturday to say all she got from BEAR was a busy signal. She was told to keep trying and Cuddles would take her call as soon as the line was available. The story this week lasts a little over three minutes and then after just a few seconds for rewinding is ready for the next call.

The stories will be changed each Friday afternoon. The primary goal of the Storyline program is to entertain youngsters and get them to associate the library with the place to go for reading materials. Cuddles always ends each story with an encouraging invitation to come to the library for other stories that they can check out and take home.
We want to thank Bruce Ewing for his time and effort in making the machine operable for what we wanted. I think that Bruce saw the advantages in such a program and was determined not to give up until he had it going. His efforts paid off and Cuddles has been answering the phone twenty-four hours a day since last Wednesday.
Our deep appreciation and thanks goes to the congregation of St. Jude’s Episcopal Church for purchasing the machine for the library. They wanted to do something for the Wellington community on their tenth anniversary here. It should be of great satisfaction to them to know that over the years their gift will bring smiles of happiness to many Wellington children when they call 6-BEAR and hear Cuddles invite them to cuddle up and hear a short story.
We hope that others of you, either organizations or individuals, will also think of the library and the impact that it can have on a community. It is a good library but it can be even better. What we need is easy access and space. Space to provide programming for both children and adults. There are all sorts of things that we can do; lunch hour brownbag book talks, lectures and classes given by experts in various disciplines and crafts. We could have family hours where mom and-or dad could attend activities with their children. This program could open up interaction within the family that could continue at home.
Perhaps we are thinking big — why not? No one has ever gotten anywhere without trying new things. Wellington can grow. As the Chamber of Commerce points out, even new industry in Wichita can bring
growth to Wellington. Many people do not want to live in large cities. They want to live in smaller communities and commute. These people are moving to communities with quality cultural and educational programs.
The Wellington Public Library can help provide these services. However, before we can, we must have the space and easy accessibility to do it. The Library Board has applied for matching federal funds but we must look to the community for financial help. We will need local funds regardless of the outcome of the grant application. We are determined to move ahead with or without the grant. Won’t you, too, make a commitment to Wellington’s future an let us know if you are willing to make a financial pledge toward the growth of the library? We have not officially started a fund drive but it would be encouraging and deeply appreciated if we had some indication of local financial support before we start.
Come on, let’s help make more programs like Storyline available. Programs that can promote reading. Let’s make the library one that Wellingtonians can visit and point to with pride.
Library receives $1,000 donation
DILLON'S MANAGER DENNIS ELSTON, presents a $1,000 check to Greg Renn, president of the Board of Trustees of the Wellington Public Library. The Dillon Foundation made the donation to the library building fund. The Library Board has reached an agreement with architects, Breidenthal & Burk, to proceed with construction plans for the new addition. The tentative schedule calls for the completion of construction documents by March 16, and the advertising for bids by March 23. Actual start of construction is planned for May 1. An additional $200,000 is still needed to complete the total project, which includes remodeling of the present facility. Donations should be sent to the Library Fund, Wellington Public
Library.
Jan 13, 1988 (photo by Janet Johnson)
Wellington Public Library:
Come celebrate Andrew Carneigie's 150th birthday Tuesday, November 26, 1985.
Schedule of Celebration:

Wellington Senior High School Band will play at 8:15 A.M. Registration for books to be given away. ''Return to Kansas'' by Hamil - Adult. Activity Book for children. Area residents are asked to write a letter describing how the Wellington Public Library has influenced their lives. Birthday cake and cookies will be served.
Clearing begins
May 9, 1989 Wellington Daily News

THE WELLINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY will hold groundbreaking ceremonies tomorrow afternoon at 3:30 for the new addition to the back of the library. To prepare for the groundbreaking a subcontractor was clearing the trees away this morning. Jack Prilliman, librarian, said that he has guessed that the trees were planted when the library was landscaped in 1916. He said that a lumber company was located on that site before 1915 A that he does not think the trees would have been there at that time.
(Photo by Linda Stinnett)
KANSAS STATE LIBRARY
913-296-3296 800-432-3919 Established August 25, 1855
August 28, 1985

Mrs. Betty McGaughey
Wellington Public Library
121 West 7th St.
Wellington, KS 67152

Dear Betty:

Thanks so much for sending the Dey history of the library, along with other "goodies." They have helped a lot. I am sending a copy of the final draft of the history that we will use in the Carnegie book unless you see something that should be changed, added or deleted. I thought the footnote was in order.
If you have any record of the architect, we can easily add it. I went back through the old newspapers until my eyes were sore but never did come across his name.
Do you want the pictures back? We will be happy to have them for the Heritage File, and will use the old postcard for the illustration in the book, but if you want them back we will return them. Let me know which is preferred.
Thanks for your help!
Yours truly,
Allen Gardiner
Libraries give knowledge for wisdom, ideas for innovation, and inspiration for freedom.
WELLINGTON
EARLY LIBRARY HISTORY

The first library was opened by a lawyer named William Black in 1884-85, a small lending library. In 1895, Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson and W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and the various societies took turns operating it. In 1898 the Prentis Study Club was organized and named for Mrs. Noble Prentis, of Topeka, wife of a widely known Kansas writer and historian, who was herself a leader in the Women's Federated Club movement. In 1899 Mrs.
Prentis came to visit the club named after her and suggested that the young ladies find some worthwhile project to work on; thus was born the idea of a library for Wellington.
On New Year's Day, 1900, a big reception was held. The gentlemen were invited to attend, the price of admission being a book in place of the customary card.
About 200 books were obtained in this manner. The library was opened in the back of a shoe store and later to the bank building on Seventh Street.
When the new city hall was being built the club women were promised two rooms on the second floor, one to be used for the library. The Prentis Study Club members asked the mayor to arrange for the city to take over the library. The Wellington Library Association, with a capital stock of $5,000 sold at $1.00 per share was set up. The Women's Federation donated $1,200 for furnishings. In March, 1908, it was determined to incorporate the library under the state law relating to public libraries, but it was voted to maintain the name Prentis Library.

THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY

On April 1,1914, at the spring election the voters approved the support of a public library by a vote of 3-1. In May, 1914, the new Wellington City Library board held its first meeting and voted to begin the process of erecting a library building. On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long-Bell Lumber Co. at the corner of Seventh Street and Jefferson Avenue for $3,500.00. The board had begun negotiations with Andrew Carnegie, and on April 19, 1915, the Carnegie Corporation stated that it would give $17,500 for a library building.
The name of the architect has been lost but the contract was awarded to J. H. Mitchell. The building was completed in December, 1915, but remained vacant for sometime due to a delay in receipt of the new furniture for the building. Meanwhile Miss Flower and Miss Hackney, the librarians, cataloged books. The library building was accepted from the contractor on June 12, 1916, was dedicated June 19, 1916, and was informally opened to the public July 1, 1916. (The new furniture had still not been received.)
DESCRIPTION OF THE BUILDING
The building is rectangular a one-story structure on a raised basement
in a classical style. The exterior is of gray tapestry brick with trimmings of Bedford and Carthage limestone. The roof is of red Spanish tile. Stone columns frame the front door on either side.
Surmounted above them, on the entablature are the words "Carnegie Library" in high relief. The portico boasts an elaborate cornice.
LATER LIBRARY HISTORY
The library now owns 39,500 volumes and serves a population of 8,200. 78,478
items were circulated in 1984. The 1985 budget is $93,000. The library is a member of the South Central Kansas Library System.
WELLINGTON
LIBRARIANS
Miss Maude Barrett 1900 - 1902
Miss Katherine Hackney 1907 - 1916
Gretchen Flower May 1916 - 1918
Lottie Ingram Aug 1918 - 1919
Miss Katherine Hackney Nov 1919 - Apr 1924
Miss Jeanne Flower Aug 1924 - Aug 1925
Mrs. H. Lucy Nichols Sep 1925 - 1929
Miss Marie Rowland 1929 - 1931
Miss Florence Williams Dec 1931 - 1940
Mrs. Ruth Merryman
[later Mrs. George Hepler] 1940 - 1946
Miss Ruth Warnock 1946 - 1948
Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey 1949 - 1958
Mrs. Fred (Olive B.) McCoy 1958 - 1971
Mrs. Leroy (Betty J.) McGaughey 1971 -
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Dey, Dorothy, "The Wellington Public Library," n.d. [Unpublished paper]
Handbook of Kansas Libraries, 1902.
Kansas Library Bulletin (various issues).
McCoy, Olive B., "History of Wellington Public Library Revealed,"
The Wellington Daily News, April 12, 1962.
Topeka Capital, Topeka, Kansas, May 27, 1916.
The Wellington Daily News, Aug. 23, 1971.
WELLINGTON CARNEGIE LIBRARY NOW LISTED AS HISTORIC SITE
The Wellington Carnegie Library has been entered in the National Register of Historic Places as of June 25, 1987, according to a news release from the Kansas State Historical Society.
Joseph W. Snell, State Historical Preservation Officer, says the listing of the Wellington Library provides recognition of the community's historic importance and assures protective review of Federal projects that might adversely affect the character of the historic property. If the property is listed in the National Register, certain Federal investment tax credits for rehabilitation and other provisions may apply.
“Listing in the National Register does not meet that limitation will be placed on the properties by the Federal government. Public visitation rights are not required of owners. The Federal government will not attach restrictive covenants to the properties or seek to acquire them,” Snell said.
Snell further stated that listing on the Register of Historic Kansas Places is an automatic condition of National Register nomination. Since 1981 the Kansas Historic Preservation Act (K.S.A. 75:2715-75:2725) has provided a strengthened review mechanism for projects undertaken by the state or any political subdivision of the state which affect properties listed on the national and Kansas registers of historic places. The law states that no governmental entity shall undertake a project which destroys, alters, or isolates national and state register properties and their environments until the State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) has been given notice of such a project and has been given the opportunity to investigate and comment upon the proposed project. Under the law, application for permits and changes which have the potential to adversely affect national and state register properties must be reviewed by the SHPO for their appropriateness before the permit is granted or the zoning change occurs.
Likewise, projects activities carried out by individuals, firms
and/or organizations that receive financial assistance from any state agency or organizations that receive financial assistance from any state agency or local governmental unit and involve properties listed on the national or state register must be reviewed by the SHPO for their impact on those historic properites.
The one-story, buff brick building sits on an ashlar cut, limestone foundation. It is a rectangular structure with a pantiled truncated hipped roof. Three bays comprise the building's facade and rear. A gable roofed, pedimented entry pavilion projects form the facade's center bay.
Limestone block quoining comprises the lower two-thirds of the door surround. A limestone architrave employing a carved banding within recessed panels which the surmounted by a reed moulding and has a scrolled limestone keystone comprises the upper third of the surround.
Two-limestone Doric columns stand in antis within the pavilion, abutting its brick wall piers. Large modillion blocks and an egg and dart moulding course comprise the entablature's cornice. Two acanthus cartouches conclude the entablature treatment. A wooden, vegetal cartouche stands in the center of the pediment’s wooden tympanum. Stone steps lead up to the doorway. Originial cast iron lightposts stand on the limestone abutments which flank the door.
Brick pilaster with limestone egg and dart capital mouldings define the building's outer corners and the window bays on the facade and rear elevations. The building's main brick body is laid in a rusticated manner, with every fifth course being recessed.
The interior of the library maintains its original open floor plan and vestibule entrance. The first floor pillars retain their marble wain-scotting.
The above description was taken from the formal nomination form submitted to the National Register of Historic Places and is not a complete listing.

----- A mystery is solved........
By Dorothy Dey

Did you ever have something happen that seemed so unbelievable if you read it in a paper, you would not believe it?
Last summer while digging through old files at the library to find material for the Kansas State Library book, that happened to me.
By chance I came across the official letter from the Carnegie Foundation that notified the Wellington Library Board they would be granted $17,500.00 to build a library building.
I read and reread that letter. I found it so incredible I could not believe it.
In 1915, a stamp cost a penny, a dime would buy five pounds of sugar and a lady could purchase a new dress for a dollar. $17,500.00 then would probably be equal to a million dollars in construction costs today.
Yet here was an official notification from a huge New York Corporation spending hundreds of thousands of dollars all over America...and the letter was full of misspelled words.
I asked myself again and again how could the Carnegie Foundation send out a letter like that. I found the

letter so fantastic that, since our mother was at the library many years and our family has always been interested in the library, I zeroxed and sent copies to my two brother.
Several weeks later I received a letter from my brother Joe who has lived in Bermuda for many years. He enclosed a feature article cut from the “New. York Times” which he had happened to read. In the middle of the article he had marked with colored pencil three lines.
“Andrew Carnegie before World War 1 spent a tidy sum of $250,000 to promote the very limited reform sponsored by the American Sim-plified Spelling Board.”
Look at that letter again. All those words that normally end in a silent “e” with the “e” left off. The word building used several times with a completely useless “u” omitted. Incurred is usually spelled with two “r’s” and an “e” is completely clear with one “r” and the “e” omitted and spelled “incurd.”
How many American school children do suppose there are today who wish Mr. Carnegie had been as successful reforming English spelling as he was building libraries?
CARNEGIE CORPORATION
OF NEW YORK
576 FIFTH AVENUE NEW YORK
JAMES BERTRAM
Secretary
April 19th 1915
Mrs, Ellien R. Clayton,
Secy., Library Board,
Wellington, Kansas.
Dear Madam:-
Responding to your communication on behalf of Wellington, Kansas, if the City agrees by resolution of Council to maintain a Free Public Library at a coat of One thousand seven hundred and fifty Dollars ($1,750) a year, and provides a suitable site for the bilding,
Carnegie Corporation of New York wil be glad to git Seventeen thousand, five hundred Dollars ($17,500) to erect a Free Public Library Bilding for Wellington, Kansas.
It should be noted that the amount indicated is to cover the cost of the Library Bilding complete, redy for occupancy and for the purpos intended.
Before any expenditure on billing or plan is incurd, the approval of proposed plans by Carnegie Corporation of New York must be secured, to obtain which pleas send tentativ plane for inspection.
Very truly yours,

CARNEGIE CORPORATION OF NEW YORK

By James Bertram
Secretary
Antique Weekly — Tri State Trader
April 15, 1985
LAST ON THE LIST of Carnegie Libraries was this one built at Hebron, Ind. Completed in 1922, the building is still in use as originally built.
(Photo by Lewis Coe)
Carnegie Created Free Libraries
It is impossible to observe National Library Week (April 14-20) without noting the contributions of Andrew Carnegie.
Carnegie, whose income hit $50,000 a year by the time he was 33, decided a few years later that there was no point in the further pursuit of money. Instead, he turned to philanthropic projects of which the library gifts were the most ambitious.
Carnegie was to discover that even giving money away is not easy if you do it right. Building libraries would have seemed beyond controversy, yet Carnegie was severely criticized on several counts. Labor leaders said he should have paid the money to his employees. With an attitude that might sound curious today, some communities turned down the offer of a free building, apparently thinking it was somehow demeaning to accept such a gift. Other critics said, with more logic, that a building alone was not a library and Carnegie did not give money to buy books. This last criticism overlooked the fact that the
building gifts were intended to be merely the catalyst that would push local groups into establishing libraries. Communities were required to guarantee funding for maintenance and were expected to raise the money for books and salaries of librarians.
The Carnegie Foundation, starting in 1898, gave a total of over 39 million dollars to 1400 communities for the purpose of building library buildings. Over 500 of the buildings were in areas where previously there had been no library of any kind. The state of Indiana led the list of Carnegie recipients, with 155 communities getting free buildings. By coincidence, the town of Hebron, Ind., was also the last to receive a Carnegie grant before the program ended on November 7, 1917. Hebron received a grant of $10,000 on Sept. 14, 1917. Delays incident to World War 1 resulted in the building not being finished until 1922. The original building is still in use as a library and has been maintained in excellent condition. — Lewis Coe
The world at your beckoning
By Paul Hawkins______________________
Special to The Wichita Eagle
Nearly a century ago, Scottish immigrant Andrew Carnegie sold his steel company and used the money from the sale to further education, culture and peace. Carnegie money helped construct some 1,400 buildings for free public libraries throughout the United States. A self-made man, Carnegie understood that books and libraries change lives.
Carnegie was not alone in recognizing the value of libraries for education, economic development and the quality of life. Nationwide, people of all ages and occupations use their local public libraries as well as other libraries located in schools, universities, community colleges, corporations, businesses, federal agencies, hospitals and prisons. Even readers who are remote from a library, like Kathleen Whitmer of the Double L Ranch in Kingman County, get books by mail through the South Central Kansas Library System in Hutchinson.
“There’s a world of information available from libraries,” says Whitmer. "From books recorded on cassettes to best sellers, repair manuals, starting a business in your home, picture books for pre-schoolers or the status of a bill in the Kansas Legislature, libraries help so much."
Since 1863 when the first public library was legally established at Seneca, Kansans have provided tax support for library services. That’s why basic services, such as borrowing a book, calling the reference department for an address or listening to a children’s storyteller are free at public libraries.
The information highway
Even before the Information Age, Kansas libraries recognized that no single library could ever have all the books that readers wanted. In the 1970s, Kansas libraries established a statewide network, KICNET, to encourage resource sharing and to identify, borrow and loan library materials. Hutchinson Public Library, Wichita State University Library and Wichita Public Library are among the top 10 providers of interli-brary loan service in the state. Last year, the staff of the three libraries gathered and delivered more than 83,000 books, photocopies of magazine articles and other library materials to fulfill the information needs of thousands of people.
KICNET is just one of the valuable sources of electronically stored and accessed information available to libraries and research facilities. Eventually, Kansas libraries will be connected to the INTERNET, which serves as a link to more than 5,000 networks of computerized databases. The databases include everything from weather reports to the complete text of the Koran. Students, business people and other researchers will also benefit from the proposed National Research and Education Network, which is being considered by the U.S. Congress. Through NREN, Kansans will have the freedom to travel electronic highways to information destinations around the world.
The ‘answer people’
Kansas libraries serve individuals who are information savvy as well as information starved. In addition to faculty and students, Wichita State University librarians Arlene Moore and Thomas DePetro assist engineers, chemists, attorneys and consultants who require highly technical and specialized information. Moore works with the patent and trademarks library, and DePetro handles the aviation and engineering collection. Research associates with Wichita’s National Institute for Aviation Research and field consultants from the Kansas Technology Enterprise Corporation rely heavily on WSU’s library to support economic development.
At the Hutchinson Public Library, Jean Gaeddert coordinates the adult literacy program. Gaeddert trains volunteers who provide free reading instruction and matches them to persons who can’t read or who want to improve their reading skills. Since 1979, the lives of more than 150 adults in the public library literacy program have been
File photo
Discovery lies within easy reach at any public library.
Since 1863 when the first public library was legally established at Seneca, Kansans have provided tax support for library services. That’s why basic services are free.
Paul Hawkins
changed because they learned how to read.
Moore, DePetro and Gaeddert are just a few of the experts in south central Kansas whose specialized knowledge of library resources help solve problems and save time. Whether the subject is government or genealogy, these “library answer people” know where to look and how to avoid the debris of the information explosion. Whether the request is from a parent doing homeschooling, a person with a disability or someone looking for the latest Danielle Steele novel, librarians have the answers or know how to find them.
The lasting effects
Here are other examples of how libraries and librarians change lives:
During a weekly story hour, Colwich Community Librarian Nancy Maus, encourages children, ages 4 to 5, to develop a love of reading. “Everything hinges on reading,” says Maus. “Children who have been read to are so much more receptive to thinking about what they see and hear. Reading opens their minds and expands their horizons.”
Leslie George, librarian at Goddard High School, teaches students to conduct computer database searches. "Students need to be acquainted with these types of research skills. In the future, they’ll be expected to use them in business, industry and medical settings.”
Ginger Stiggins, a former Wichita public school librarian, remembers an elementary school student who was looking for a book. “The little boy told me his father was an alcoholic. He wanted me to find him a book that would help his dad stop drinking.”
Although it’s not a school library, the Westlink Branch Public Library serves hundreds of students in northwest Wichita. “In the afternoons and evenings, there are students here from parochial and public schools like St. Francis Elementary, Northwest High School, Bishop Carroll High and Wilbur Junior High
School. The library is a place to study, get materials for class assignments or just find something fun to read,” says library manager Linda Scott.
“Many of the residents of this facility have never availed themselves to a library,” says Dr. Donald J. Martin, librarian at the El Dorado Correctional Facility Inmate Library. “Now that they are restricted, they turn to books and magazines. The library and reading are a discovery.”
In a letter to the Wellington Public Library Board, 85-year-old Dorothy Geddes Gropp of Greenbelt, Md., writes: “As always, the enclosed check is in appreciation of the many wonderful hours I spent in the old Carnegie Library while growing up in Wellington from 1913 thru 1925.”
If Gropp returned to Wellington, she’d see the library in the midst of a $700,000 expansion and renovation project The building project will allow the Wellington library to retain its 77-year-old Carnegie heritage, expand its 35,000 volume collection and accommodate new technologies such as a computerized catalog. But more important, the renovated and expanded public library will offer every Wellington resident the opportunities and resources for life-long learning that were so important in Dorothy Geddes Gropp’s life.
Books change lives. Libraries change lives. Just visit a library and read for yourself.
Paul Hawkins is the regional library consultant for the 130-member South Central Kansas Library System, headquartered in Hutchinson. For more information: Paul Hawkins, Regional Library Consultant, South Central Kansas Library System, 800-234-0529, Ext. 113.
DAILY PRAYER
Prayers can be too selfish, Lord. Turn our minds first toward you to remember your love before rehearsing personal needs. Amen.
Tempo
Carnegie's legacy built on need for
know ledge
Continued from first Tempo page be called The Gospel of Wealth.” Carnegie believed that a fortune is a trust to be administered for the good of mankind. As he put it, “To die rich is to die disgraced.”
At the time, some critics said Carnegie might have simply distributed money to the poor, but that would nave rubbed against his Scots Calvinist grain. No, the money should go to institutions and causes that would help people who wanted to help themselves. He, after all, had done just that.
Andrew Carnegie was born in 1835 to a poor weaver and his wife in Dunfermline, Scotland. In later life, he recalled fondly the times his father read to the other men of the village. After the family immigrated to America and settled in what is now a part of Pittsburgh, young Carnegie spent Saturday afternoons in the study of Col. James Anderson, who opened his large private library to working boys of the area. Carnegie, who had no formal schooling past the age of 12, completed his education in Anderson’s study. More important, Carnegie’s love of reading and literature grew from those happy Saturday afternoons.
“It was when reveling in the treasures opened to us,” Carnegie wrote later,
‘that I resolved if ever wealth came to me that other poor boys might receive opportunities similar to those for which we are indebted to that noble man.
So, like the 7,689 organs he donated to churches or the aid he gave to the Simplified Spelling Board, his library grants originated in a personal interest. But libraries also suited his bootstrap outlook on life.
“I chose free libraries,” he said, “as the best agencies for improving the masses of the people, because they give nothing for nothing. They only help those who help themselves. They reach the aspiring, and open to these the chief treasures of the world—those stored up m books.'’
Looking back over his career as a philanthropist, he divided the time into what he humorously called his “retail” and “wholesale” periods. His first libraries, which he began to give away in 1886, went to the towns and cities with which he had personal or professional connec tions—Dunfermline Braddock, Homestead and Duchesne, three Pennsylvania towns where he had steel mills. Pittsburgh refused his first offer, but nine years later the city was pleased to accept $1 million for a main library and seven branches.
These first libraries were really community centers of which a library was only one part. The buildings could have a gymnasium, a music hall, and an art gallery , the Carnegie Institute in Pittsburgh was charged with providing
rooms for scientific research and the dissemination of technical knowledge.”
By the time his “retail period ended m 1898, he had donated money for only 16 buildings. These “retail” grants were larger than the average grant during his “wholesale” period, which began at the turn of the century at about the time he sold his interest in Carnegie Steel [which eventually became U.S. Steel]. After the sale he had a vast fortune at his disposal and that is precisely what he intended
to do with it
Maywood Public Library in 1921. It is one of five Carnegie library buildings remaining in the Chicago suburbs
Cartoonists portrayed Carnegie as Santa with a bag of library buildings.
Until World War I put an end to his library work he made an average of 60 grants a year. In 1903 alone he gave money for 204 libraries. The majority were in the United States, but Camegies are scattered throughout the English-speaking world. There were still large grants—New York received $5.2 million in 1901 for 65 branch libraries—but now the majority were similar to the $12,500 given for the Maywood library
Most of the libraries are in small Midwestern towns. Indiana received 164 building grants, the most of any state. Illinois’ 105 grants totaled $i.6 million, one of the top five state totals. The only states without Carnegies are Rhode Island and Delaware.
Approving editorial cartoonists portrayed Carnegie as a Santa Claus whose bag was stuffed with library buildings. Mr. Dooley, that favorite fictional saloonkeeper of turn-of-the-century Chicago. asked one of the regulars in his tavern if “Andhrew Carnaygie'' had given him a library yet. No Mr Hen-nessy answered he hadn’t
He will.”’ said Mr. Dooley Ye'll not escape him. Befure he dies he hopes to crowd a libry on ivry man, woman an’ child in th’ counthry. They’re tearin’ down gashouses an’ poorhouses to put up libries. Befure another year, ivry house in Pittsburgh that ain’t a blast-furnace will be a Camaygie libry.”
As the number of his grants increased, the features he required in his libraries diminished. He wanted communities to
An artists rendition of Carnegie's first library in Braddock, Pa., in 1889
use his money for no other purpose than to build a library, and not a fancy one at that. A fellow Scotsman, James Bertram, was responsible for all correspondence regarding the libraries, and at times his exasperation with the grandiose plans of Anytown, U.S. A., erupted in his replies:
“A request for $30,000 to erect a library building for 5,000 people is so preposter ous that Mr. Carnegie cannot give it any consideration.”
Or: “Mr. Carnegie would like to know whether it is the committee or the architects who are to blame for putting up a monument instead of a Library Building.”
Carnegie could be caustic, too. He wrote across the plans submitted for a library in Denver: “I am sorry to have my money wasted in this way. Too many pillars.”
Although library boards often wrote entreating letters to Bertram asking for more money to meet unexpected expenses. Carnegie rarely increased the original gift. And, incredible as it seems, a well-made two-story library such as Maywood’s could be built and furnished for slightly more than $18,000. Today, an addition to Geneva’s Carnegie library [built for $8,000 in 1908] is going to cost almost $900,000.
Carnegie’s check-writing binge coincided with a unique moment in American history. After the closing of the frontier
in the 1890s, the small towns of the West and Midwest were busy with the chores of providing basic public services. And, with the rapid expansion of the big, industrial cities, the nearby railroad suburbs, such as Maywood, were rapidly outgrowing their original public buildings. When the May wood library board asked for a grant, the library was jam med into a room in the village hall.
“By the 1890s, libraries nad already been built in many cities of the Northeast,” said Timothy Rub, curator of a recent exhibit on Carnegie libraries at Carnegie’s old mansion in New York, now the Cooper-Hewitt Museum. “So you don’t find many Carnegie buildings there. But in the new and growing towns of the Midwest, libraries had to compete for limited funds against some very important things, such as sewers, roads and the like. All those improvements required taxation, and many politicians felt that a library should not be supported with additional taxes.”
So Carnegie saved them the expense of constructing a library. By today’s standards, his grants came with no strings. He did not interfere in the community’s choice of books for the library and, for the most part, did not impose uniformity of design. In 1911, Bertram issued “Notes on the Erection of Library Bildings”
[ written in the simplified spelling Car negie favored], which suggested the most
To the editor:
In today’s edition of the Wel- ington Daily News, there is an ad- rtisement by the board of trustees the Wellington Public Library rich details the rationale used by the board in seeking a two-mill, three-year tax levy to assist in com- pletion of the library project. Some readers of today’s edition may be puzzled as to why the library board placed an advertisement to explain position.
The board submitted the exact language used in today’s advertise-ment to the Daily News as a
proposed letter to the editor under
the belief that the library project is a fundamental issue of community in- terest. That letter was rejected by the Daily News because it was signed by each board member which
violates “policy.” Nor could the letter be submitted on behalf of the board signed only by the president of the board because that too would violate Daily News policy. The alternatives offered by the Daily News for publication as a letter to the editor were not acceptable to the board.
The board does not pretend to un- derstand the logic behind the Daily News editorial policy, but does believe that it is important that the
community which is being asked support the mill levy understand in the board’s own words why the mill levy is being requested at this time. As a result, as individuals, we have paid for today’s advertisement and
trust that it assists in your evalua- tion as to the merits of both the project and the mill levy request.
H. Douglas Pfalzgraf

WELLINGTON DAILY NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1992
An open letter to the community
Dear Citizens,

As you may have read in the City Council report in the January 22 Daily News, a protest petition in reference to the City Council’s approval of a three-year, two-mill levy for the Wellington Public Library has been validated. The City’s proposed expenditure would generate approximately $48,000 a year over the next three years. The library project consists of PHASE I, WHICH IS NOW COMPLETE AND PAID FOR, and Phase II, which is the finishing of the new structure and the complete renovation of the existing structure. Of the approximately $600,000 total cost of the project, $450,000 WILL HAVE BEEN RAISED THROUGH GRANTS, DONATIONS, AND SAVINGS. We are asking the City for the additional $145,000 from the mill levy to help complete the project.
The project was commenced in earnest in 1984 after considerable discussion regarding several significant deficiencies inherent in the EXISTING FACILITY, WHICH WAS BUILT IN 1916. The first and foremost of the CONCERNS was the complete inaccessibility for the HANDICAPPED. A second concern was the condition of the existing structure, particularly the mechanical systems, including an inadequate, OLD, BOILER-TYPE HEATING SYSTEM. A third concern was the lack of SPACE for increased shelving and much-needed programs such as literacy enhancements and large-print publications for the SIGHT-IMPAIRED.
To address these and other issues, the then members of the Board and staff consulted with librarians and trustees at other Carnegie libraries where projects to solve similar problems had been undertaken. An architect who specializes in Carnegie library renovations was retained. After lengthy consideration and review, and once the existing structure was determined to be structurally sound, the course of action which has been followed (to renovate and expand, not build anew) was adopted.
In a good faith effort to exhaust other sources of revenue prior to turning to the City for help, our initial intent was for the Library to be funded with as little of local taxpayers’ money as possible. The COMMUNITY has responded to the Library project with astounding GENEROSITY. To date over 2,000 different individuals, groups, and businesses—specifically, 37 groups and clubs, 43 businesses, banks, and churches, and 1,951 individuals —have contributed to the project. Programs from bake sales to ice cream socials to telethons have produced funds for the Library.
In early 1987, the Board submitted a grant proposal, gave a presentation in Topeka for Title II federal funds, and received $50,000. We went again to Topeka in 1989 and were denied any funds. In addition, we applied for 67 private grants throughout the United States. We were finalists for three of those grants: the Knight-Ridder, Pfizer, and Kresage. Due to the generosity and patience of the community, Phase I was completed this fall despite the difficulties encountered when the general contractor became insolvent and problems with the exterior block veneer necessitated removal and replacement by the bonding company for the insolvent general contractor. As the contractor’s bond coverage covered those costs, no additional funds were used to correct these problems.
With donations of $125,000 on hand, the Board then considered how best to address Phase II’s estimated cost of $396,000. We agreed that, after previous federal grant applications, there appeared to be no realistic chance of receiving additional Title II federal funding without some formal monetary participation from the City of Wellington. As a result, we reviewed the matter extensively and in October recommended to the City Council a three-year, two-mill levy. In November the Council approved the mill levy on the condition that the Library received additional federal funds. Also in November the Board presented and received A FEDERAL GRANT OF $44,000 CONTINGENT UPON OUR BEING ABLE TO COMPLETE THE PROJECT WITH CITY FUNDING AND DONATIONS.
Prior to the filing of the protest petition, we were finally in a position to complete the Library project. With City funding, donations, and the federal grant, we totalled about $320,000 of the necessary $396,000 to complete the project. Our meeting in January was to bring our architect in to begin completion proceedings. With most of the balance between $320,000 and $396,000 being shelving, furniture, etc., we felt the building project could be completed and that raising the balance was certainly reasonable and attainable. With the filing of the protest petition, both the mill levy and the $44,000 in
federal funds will be lost if the issue is not favorably voted upon.

States. We were finalists lor three of those grants; the Knight-Ridder, Pfizer, and .
Kresage. Due to the generosity and patience of the community, Phase I was completed this fall despite the difficulties encountered when the general contractor became insolvent and problems with the exterior block veneer necessitated removal and replacement by the bonding company for the insolvent general contractor. As the contractor’s bond coverage covered those costs, no additional funds were used to correct these problems.
With donations of $125,000 on hand, the Board then considered how best to address Phase II’s estimated cost of $396,000. We agreed that, after previous federal grant applications, there appeared to be no realistic chance of receiving additional Title II federal funding without some formal monetary participation from the City of Well- ington. As a result, we reviewed the matter extensively and in October recommended to the City Council a three-year, two-mill levy. In November the Council approved the mill levy on the condition that the Library received additional federal funds. Also in November the Board presented and received A FEDERAL GRANT OF $44,000 CON- TINGENT UPON OUR BEING ABLE TO COMPLETE THE PROJECT WITH CITY FUNDING AND DONATIONS.
Prior to the filing of the protest petition, we were finally in a position to complete the Library project. With City funding, donations, and the federal grant, we totalled about $320,000 of the necessary $396,000 to complete the project. Our meeting in January was to bring our architect in to begin completion proceedings. With most of the balance between $320,000 and $396,000 being shelving, furniture, etc., we felt the building project could be completed and that raising the balance was certainly reasonable and attainable. With the filing of the protest petition, both the mill levy and the $44,000 in federal funds will be lost if the issue is not favorably voted upon.
The Board of Trustees of the Library, both past and present, have worked diligently on this building project for the last eight years. We have received helpful suggestions from many in the community as to fund-raising ideas, and several of the ideas have been adopted to attempt to increase contributions still further. We respectfully submit that careful analysis has been made in formulating the Board’s belief that the $145,000 generated by a two-mill, three-year levy is well worth the benefit that this $600,000 renovation and addition project will give to citizens of all ages in the community. A NO VOTE ON THIS MILL LEVY ISSUE, AND THE RESULTING LOSS OF FEDERAL FUNDING, WILL IN ALL LIKELIHOOD RESULT IN THE NEW NORTH ADDITION BEING EMPTY AND THE EXISTING BUILDING REMAINING THE SAME AS IT IS TODAY FOR MANY YEARS TO COME.
It is our understanding that some, or all, of the proponents and carriers of the petition, who are Acy Cody, Conita Cody, Rocky DeLano, Ruth Larimore, and Jacqulyn Slack,
represented, to many who signed the petition, that they are not against the Library project but instead just desire an opportunity to vote on the issue. That argument would seem to belie common sense and merely serves as an apparent guise to appear supportive to gain signatures on the petition so as to avoid having to address the real issues, such as the dire need for handicapped accessibility, etc., and the loss of federal funding.
However, the petition has now been filed, and in recognition of the democratic process, the Board believes that, even in these difficult economic times, a vast majority of voters will consider the overwhelming benefits and fundamental values of the Library project when these are weighed against its minimal and short-term tax consequences: WHICH IS $145,000 COST TO THE TAXPAYERS FOR COMPLETION OF A $600,000 PROJECT.
In closing, the Board extends its sincere thanks to the Mayor, City Council, and the community for their unwavering support throughout this lengthy project, and we seek your continued SUPPORT OF THE LIBRARY WITH A FAVORABLE VOTE ON APRIL 7, 1992.
SINCERELY,
Greg S. Renn
H. Douglas Pfalzgraf
Jan Korte
Kenneth Jones
Bob Weir
Louise Leslie
Sylvia Whitney
The Board of Trustees
Wellington Public Library
The preceding was paid for by the Board of Trustees of the Wellington Public Library.


Wellington's Carnegie Library to open in
its glor
THURSDAY, JUNE 16,1994
by Linda Stinnett

Sunday will be the 78th anniversary of Wellington’s Carnegie Library’s dedication to the community — on the same weekend the renovated and expanded building reopens to the public in all its glory.
An open house to allow the public to view the masterpiece, is set for Saturday from 1-5 p.m., according to Librarian Jack Prilliman. The library board chose not to have the open house Sunday, on the day of the original dedication, due to the Father’s Day holiday.
Since 1985 the board has been involved in the project to enlarge and renew the original structure, according to Doug Pfalzgraf, board member. The project began that year, when the beginning signs of functional failure and problems of handicap accessibility came up, he said.
For two years the board studied the problem and then hired a architectural firm. Fund-raising began and $200,000 was given from differing sources in the community — $25,000 in private donations; $50,000 in grant money; and $125,000 in library seed funds — to start the venture which had been designed as a three-phase project, Pfalzgraf said.
In 1988 ground was broken to start the exterior shell of the addition to the building. That work was finished and fund-raising began again so work could progress on the interior. The third phase — which will be completed later — is exterior renovations to the existing building and grounds, Pfalzgraf said.
For nearly a year the library has been in temporary housing as the interior underwent extensive renovation. Three times the books have been moved, twice to temporary locations and once back to the library after construction was fin-
Wellington has a spectacular Carnegie Library and as such was recently honored in the Architectural issue of library buildings 2001, in the Dec. issue of Library Journal. An application was submitted upon completion of the South entrance last spring.
The vestibule was recessed to allow for easier access to the building, tile flooring was replaced, new walls smoothly finished, and the ceiling lowered by Gordon Construction Company. They made a lasting impression with the installation of solid wood doors, framed and finished by beautiful lathe work.
Duane Hickerson of PBA Architects of Wichita, KS expertly preserved the look of the original tile, having it recreated and repeating patterns in etched glass doors, and in stained glass design. Duane is wonderful to work with, diligent and thorough. Ditto for Gordon’s, who stayed on schedule, and weathered any storm, including a 60 mile per hour windy day which powdered all of us with fine dust!
It was June 1994 when Wellington moved back into the Carnegie Library after extensive renovation, from new tile roofing to forest green carpeting and all points in between.
The addition was funded by a community drive and LSCA matching funds, and took several years to complete. A Children’s Library was added, a community room developed and the elevator made all areas accessible. The building encompasses 8928 square feet.
Philanthropy is alive and doing well to support
such additions and renovations as our library has seen over
the past ten years. Continued local support through contributions
and memorial funds allows for more materials,
technology, and access for all citizens.
Local legal services freely given, support of businesses, and involvement of board members have benefited the library greatly.
Thank you, citizens of Wellington for the continued support of a wonderful community library with full service for all ages.
Come check us out!
153
WELLINGTON
EARLY LIBRARY HISTORY
The first library was opened by a lawyer named William Black in 1884— 85, a small lending library. In 1895, Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz-Whitson and W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and the various societies took turns operating it. In 1898, the Prentis Study Club was organized and named for Mrs. Noble Prentis, of Topeka, wife of a widely known Kansas writer and historian, who was herself a leader in the Women's Federated Club movement. In 1899, Mrs. Prentis came to visit the club named after her and suggested that the young ladies find some worthwhile project to work on; thus was born the idea of a library for Wellington.
On New Year's Day, 1900, a big reception was held. The gentlemen were invited to attend, the price of admission being a book in place of the customary card. About 200 books were obtained in this manner. The library was opened in the back of a shoe store and later moved to the bank building on Seventh Street.
When the new city hall was being built the club women were promised two rooms on the second floor, one to be used for the library. The Prentis Study Club members asked the mayor to arrange for the city to take over the library. The Wellington Library Association, with a capital stock of $5,000.00 sold at $1.00 per share, was set up. The Women's Federation donated $1,200.00 for furnishings. In March, 1908, it was determined to incorporate the library under the state law relating to public libraries, but it was voted to maintain the name Prentis Library.
THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY
On April 1, 1914, at the spring election the voters approved the
support of a public library by a vote of 3-1. In May, 1914, the Wellington City Library board held its first meeting and voted to begin the process of erecting a library building. On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long-Bell Lumber Co. at the corner of Seventh Street and Jefferson Avenue for $3,500.00. The board had begun negotiations with Andrew Carnegie, and on April 19, 1915, the Carnegie Corporation stated that it would give $17,500.00 for a library building.
The name of the architect has been lost but the contract was awarded to J. H. Mitchell. The building was completed in December, 1915, but remained vacant for sometime due to a delay in receipt of the new furniture. Meanwhile, Miss Flower and Miss Hackney, the librarians, cataloged books. The library building was accepted from the contractor on June 12, 1916, was dedicated June 19, 1916, and was informally opened to the public July 1, 1916. (The new furniture had still not been received.)
154
DESCRIPTION OF THE BUILDING
The building is rectangular, one story above a raised basement, in a classical style. The exterior is of gray tapestry brick with trimmings of Bedford and Carthage limestone. The roof is of red Spanish tile.
Stone columns frame the front door on either side. Surmounted above them, on the entablature, are the words "Carnegie Library" in high relief. The portico boasts an elaborate cornice.
LATER LIBRARY HISTORY
0f
The library owns 39,500 volumes and serves a population of 8,200.
78,500 items were circulated in 1984. The 1985 budget is $93,000.00.
The library is a member of the South Central Kansas Library System.
LIBRARIANS
Miss Maude Barrett 1900 - 1902
Miss Katherine Hackney 1907 - 1916* Donna McNeil
Miss Gretchen Flower May 1916 - 1918 2005
Lottie Ingram Aug 1918 - 1919
Miss Katherine Hackney Nov 1919 - Apr 1924 Kim Wiens
Miss Jeanne Flower Aug 1924 - Aug 1925 2005 - 2013
Mrs. H. Lucy Nichols Sep 1925 - 1929
Miss Marie Rowland 1929 - 1931
Miss Florence Williams Dec 1931 - 1940 Sara Dixon
Mrs. Ruth Merryman 2013 - 2015
[later Mrs. George Hepler] 1940 - 1946
Miss Ruth Warnock 1946 - 1948
Mrs. DeWitt C. (Nona Hart) Dey 1949 - 1958
Mrs. Fred (Olive B.) McCoy 1958 - 1971
Mrs. Leroy (Betty J.) McGaughey 1971 - 1986
Jack Prilliman 1986 1995
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Dey, Dorothy, "The Wellington Public Library," n.d.
Handbook of Kansas Libraries, 1902.
Kansas State Library. Kansas Library Bulletin (various issues).
McCoy, Olive B., "History of Wellington Public Library Revealed," The Wellington Daily News, April 12, 1962.
Topeka Capital, Topeka, Kansas, May 27, 1916.
The Wellington Daily News, Wellington, Kansas, Aug. 23, 1971.
*The early records are confusing as to the librarians. The Wellinqton Daily News on July 1, 1916, spoke of Miss Flower and Miss Hackney cataloging the books, and on August 12 of that year reported that Miss Flower had accepted a position in Wisconsin; Miss Hackney was to continue as assistant librarian. The Dey history states that Miss Gretchen Friend, a librarian at [the then] Emporia Teacher's College, was hired to organize the new library but returned to Emporia in September and management of the library was turned over to Miss Hackney; Friend apparently remained an official library consultant while Hackney was listed as librarian. In 1918-1919 Lottie Ingram was listed as librarian while Kate Hackney actually "ran" the library.
City Library, Wellington, Kans.—7
WELLINGTON
WINFIELD
Page 2_______Wellington News
Feb 26, 1992
—Deaths-Services—
Lucile Adele Renn

Lucile Adele Renn, 89, died Monday, Feb. 24, at Friendship Manor in Wellington.
She was born on June 12,1902, in Wellington, the daughter of Adele Susan (Galli) and Emmett Wimer.

She was a lifelong Wellington resident. She attended Wellington schools and graduated from Sumner County High School with the class of 1920. She then attended and graduated from Christian College for girls in Columbia, Mo.

She married George S. Renn on Aug. 22, 1922, in Wellington.

Renn was active in community affairs and some of her memberships include: The First United Methodist Church; Eastern Star; Charter member of the 8 & 40; member of and past president of the American Legion Auxiliary; member of and past president of E.T. Chapter, P.E.O.; Library Board; Canteen chairperson during World War II; and Canteen chairperson of the Civil Defense.

She was preceded in death by her parents; husband, George, on April 30, 1974; and son, Bob, in 1988.

Survivors include her daughters, Peggy Richards of Houston, Texas, and Nancy Leas, of Wellington; eight grandchildren; and 12 , great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held Friday at 11 a.m. at the First United Methodist Church with the Rev. Alan Lindal officiating. Interment will be in the Prairie Lawn Cemetery.

Memorials have been established with the Wellington Library and the First United Methodist Church. Contributions may be left at the funeral home where friends may call tonight from 6 until 9 p.m. and on Thursday from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m.
Arrangements made by Hawks Funeral Home.
Page 5 THE WELLINGTON (KAN.) DAILY NEWS
1901-There Was No Library
FIRST LIBRARY, BUTTREY SHOE STORE
New City Hall, 1907 Library in Room on the
Although there was no public library in Wellington on the day the DAILY NEWS was first published in 1901, the idea was already well developed and the beginning of such a library was taking shape.
In 1895 Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz Whitson and Mr. W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and loan library which was placed first in Coverdale’s clothing store and then in a little frame building south of the ANTLERS Hotel.
People in town donated furniture, books and some money and the young people’s societies of the different churches furnished the necessary labor, each society being responsible for one week at a time. For a-bout four years the room was open evenings. For a small fee young people could come to the reading room where refreshments were available and spend an evening reading or playing games, but the place was actually more of a youth recreation center than a real library.
In 1899 a group of young girls just out of high school decided to organize a club. Since at that time Mrs. Noble Prentis was a greatly admired Kansas woman, they named their club after her. A short time later Mrs. Prentis found it possible to visit the club which had done her such honor and during her visit suggested to the young women, mostly interested in dates and good times and parties, that if their organization was to be worthwhile, they should find a real objective for their energies. So the Prentis Club decided to establish a library for Wellington.
On New Year’s Day, 1900, they held a big reception at the F. K. Robbins home and invited all the gentlemen of the town to come and bring a book for the library.
Harry Buttrey offered the Prentis Club members a few shelves in the rear of his shoe store, and so with books and shelves, the young ladies were in business and Wellington had a real lending library.
The library was only open on Saturday afternoons and at first the young ladies took turns working at the library. Later Miss Maud Barrett was elected librarian and served for two years.
In the meantime on June 22, 1899, the county commissioners had let the contract for $16,754 for the new stone county jail that stood so long on the C street side df the courthouse square.
When the building was completed, the Prentis Club members saw a wonderful opportunity to further their library plans and secured permission to put on a huge house warming carnival to dedicate the new building. Everybody came to the gala affair and quite a tidy sum was added to the library fund.
1907 - NEW CITY HALL -NEW ROOM FOR LIBRARY
In 1907 the Lecture Course committee turned over their entire season’s profits of $340.48 to the Prentis Club library and since the new City Hall was now completed, the club was gi-
ven two rooms on the third floor for their public library and a social hall provided they would furnish the rooms.
In February 1908 Mayor W. T. Hubbard called a public meeting to discuss some different arrangement for the library which had grown too much for one small club of young women to handle successfully and shortly afterwards the Wellington Library Association was organized and incorporated under the state law as relating to public libraries. At that time it was voted that the library would be called the Prentis Library.
A number of organizations and individuals donated money for furniture and books to equip the new library on the third floor of the City Hall and the Santa Fe gave a gift of $500 worth of books. Miss Katherine Hackney was elected librarian to work each Saturday afternoon the library was open and her salary was to be whatever she collected in fines on overdue books.
A MILLIONAIRE HELPS OUT THE LIBRARY
On May 16, 1914 the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board was held with Mayor George H Hunter serving as president, M. C. Burton as vice president, Mrs. Ellen R. Clayton as secretary and E. B. Roser as treasurer. Other members were Mrs. E. T. Hackney, Mrs. W. H. Maddy, H. L Buttrey, Miss Maude Price, and W H. Burks. For the next twenty years Mr. Burks and Mrs. Hackney served faithfully as library board members until the public library was firmly established.
At that time Andrew Carnegie had inaugurated his program of sprinkling his name all over America in the form of grants to build library buildings that would henceforth be called by his name. On April 10, 1915, the Wellington Library Board voted to purchase the Long Belt Lumber Company property at the corner of 7th and Jefferson for $3,500.
In accordance with the provisions of a grant of $17,500 received from the Carnegie Foundation, the city hereafter agreed to spend ten per cent of that a-mount, or $1750 each year to maintain the public library in Wellington.
Today, due to rising and inflated costs, growth in population and increased library services, the public library spends every year for operation and maintenance almost as much as the whole building cost in 1916.
But library service is one thing a town can ill afford to do without. A number of years ago a member of the Wellington library staff received a letter from a former resident that so well expressed what a library means to a town. “Libraries have always fascinated me. They house so many mysteries of the world. I remember very vividly the first time I set foot in the Wellington Public Library. Miss Anabel Williams, my first grade teach- er at old Third Ward, had one day imparted the exciting news
to me that I could find many books to read in a wonderful building and furthermore could take them home with me for two weeks without paying a
cent.
“That afternoon instead of going home immediately, I walked the two blocks to the library, and with a rapidly beating heart, mounted the stairs on my wonderful quest. I didn’t know what to do, and the large counter looming just inside the door stopped me in my tracks. A very kind lady asked me what I wanted. I stated simply that I wanted a book. ‘Did I have a card. That bit of a question ruined my dreams. I was completely crushed. I had never heard that a card was needed. The lady must have sensed my disappointment. She promised me I could take a book home with me if I would also take a card home for my parents to sign. I was overjoyed, and after looking over several books carefully, I selected my first
book, ‘A Boy’s Life of George Washington. A new world was open to me and I must admit that the gingerbread boy seemed pretty dull reading after that.
“For the next twelve years the Wellington Library was as much a part of my education as any class at school. By means of the library, I explored the length and breath of our country. I fought every battle in the Civil War. I wandered through every country in Europe. I found that there were other newspapers in the world besides the WELLINGTON DAILY NEWS. And in later years I dis-
covered the rich history of my own town and county.
“From that day to this I have been hopelessly under the spell of libraries and I always shall be. It has been my great privilege to visit some of the greatest libraries in our own country and Europe, but the strongest attachment I have to any is to the public library in Wellington for there I met the world for the first time.”
AS THE YEARS HAVE GONE BY
Public librarians seem to have a habit of not roving very much if those who have served our Carnegie Library are typical. Since 1916 the librarians have been Miss Jeanne Flower, Miss Kate Hackney, Mrs. Lucy Nichols, Mass Marie Rowland, Miss Florence Williams, Mrs. George Hepler Miss Ruth Warnock, Mrs. De-Witt Dey, Mrs. Fred McCoy, and Mrs. Leroy McGaughey.
Modern library service has changed a great deal in the seventy years since the time when the Prentis Club members set a few books on shelves in the Harry Buttrey’s shoe store.
Today the beautiful upstairs reading and reference rooms, the delightful children’s library down stairs, the microfilm reader and an abundance of films of old records and newspapers, the gorgeous paintings, the music records, projectors, copying service, and many thousands of books and periodicals of every type offer marvelous resources for people of all interests and all ages.
In 1901 there was no library; in 1971 Wellington has a public library that far exceeds anything a person could have dreamed of seventy years ago.
In Appreciate
Those of us who have been especially concerned with the production of the Wellington Centennial edition are most grateful to the City of Wellington, the many people who have served on the Library Board since 1916 and the staff of the Wellington Public Library, both past and present.
Without the resources available at the library, the material in this special edition of the News would have been impossible to secure. Many times in the last two years we have searched for information concerning events of the various events of the various eras of United States history that we might understand better some of the things that happened in Wellington. The information we needed about our town and county has been endless, and the items gleaned from micro- films of old and long since defunct newspapers invaluable.
So it is with much appreciation that the DAILY NEWS says thank you to the Wellington Library for all the help given in producing the Centennial paper.
WELLINGTON LIBRARY-1971
On Oct. 30, 1924, Mrs. Noble Prentis returned to Wellington to visit again the club she had visited so many years before when she had challenged a small group qf gay, pleasure-loving young women that they
WELLINGTON (KAN.) DAILY NEWS MONDAY, AUGUST 23, 1971
.
New City Hall, 1907 Library in Room on third floor
30,000 BOOKS AVAILABLE HERE TODAY
In Appreciation of the Public Librarv
Those of us who have been especially concerned with the production of the Wellington Centennial edition are most grateful to the City of Wellington, the many people who have served on the Library Board since 1916 and the staff of the Wellington Public Library, both past and present.
Without the resources available at the library, the material in this special edition of the News would have been impossible to secure. Many times in the last two years we have searched for information concerning events of the various events of the various eras of United States history that we might understand better some of the things that happened in Wellington. The information we needed about our town and county has been endless, and the items gleaned from micro films of old and long since de funct newspapers invaluable.
So it is with much appreciation that the DAILY NEWS says thank you to the Wellington Library for all the help given in producing the Centennial paper.
WELLINGTON LIBRARY-1971
On Oct. 30, 1924, Mrs. Noble Prentis returned to Wellington to visit again the club she had visited so many years before when she had challenged a small group of gay, pleasure loving young women that they
should find something worthwhile to do for their town.
After a delicious dinner at the Harvey House, the Prentis Club and their guests assembled at the home of Mrs. Sophia Knowles while Mrs. Prentis listened with great pleasure at the accomplishment her suggestion had brought about.
It is too bad that Mrs. Prentis cannot return today to see the real result of that long ago challenge.
The present library staff includes Mrs. Leroy McGaughey, Mrs. Charles Mallory, Mrs. Fred Erker and two student assistants, Patty Kreifels and Eli-
zabeth Locke. Serving on , the Library Board are Mayor Her-man Zoglmann, Mrs. Willard Voils, Mrs. C. E. Russell, Mrs. J. W. Garland, Mrs. Garland Mountz, R. G. Morris, R. J. Renn, and Howard Frazer.
As of Jan. 1, 1971. the annual circulation figures included 41,- 059 adult and 23,759 juvenile or a total of 64,818. At the Welling- ton library 4072 people have a library card of which 738 are rural patrons. There are 30,477 books on the shelves; and 174 magazines and periodicals are received during the year. The average daily circulation figure is approximately 200 each day.
Page 8 THE WELLINGTON (KAN.) DAILY NEWS

FIRST LIBRARY, BUTTREY’S SHOE STORE
New City Hall, 1907 Library in Room on third floor
1901--There Was No Library
Although there was no public library in Wellington on the day the DAILY NEWS was first published in 1901, the idea was already well developed and the beginning of such a library was taking shape.
In 1895 Mrs. Katie Sniggs, Mrs. Lulu Frantz Whitson and Mr. W. H. Schulte sponsored a reading room and loan library which was placed first in Cov-erdale’s clothing store and then in a little frame building south of the ANTLERS Hotel.
People in town donated furniture, books and some money and the young people’s societies of the different churches furnished the necessary labor, each society being responsible for one week at a time. For a-bout four years the room was open evenings. For a small fee young people could come to the reading room where refreshments were available and spend an evening reading or playing games, but the place was actually more of a youth recreation center than a real library.
In 1899 a group of young girls just out of high school decided to organize a club. Since at that time Mrs. Noble Prentis was a greatly admired Kansas wo-men, they named their club after her. A short time later Mrs. Prentis found it possible to visit the club which had done her such honor and during her visit suggested to the young women, mostly interested in dates and good times and parties, that if their organization was to be worthwhile, they should find a real objective, for their energies. So the Prentis Club decided to establish a library for Wellington.
On New Year’s Day, 1900, they held a big reception at the F. K. Robbins home and invited all the gentlemen of the town to come and bring a book for the library.
Harry Buttrey offered the Prentis Club members a few shelves in the rear of his shoe store, and so with books and shelves, the young ladies were in business and Wellington had a real lending library.
The library was only open on Saturday afternoons and at first the young ladies took turns working at the library'. Later Miss Maud Barrett was elected librarian and served for two
years.
In the meantime on June 22, the county commissioners et the contract for $16,754 ie new stone county jail stood so long on the C side Of the courthouse e.
When the building was com-pleted, the Prentis Club mem-saw a wonderful opportu-nity to further their library and secured permission t on a huge house warm-ing carnival to dedicate the new building. Everybody came to the gala affair and quite a tidy sum was added to the library
- NEW CITY HALL — ROOM FOR LIBRARY
1907 the Lecture Course Committee turned over their en-tire season’s profits of $340.48 to the Prentis Club library and the new City Hall was completed, the club was gi-
ven two rooms on the third floor for their public library and a social hall provided they would furnish the rooms.
In February 1908 Mayor W. T. Hubbard called a public meeting to discuss some different arrangement for the library which had grown too much for one small club of young women to handle successfully and shortly afterwards the Wellington Library Association was organized and incorporated under the state law as relating to public libraries. At that time it was voted that the library would be called the Prentis Library.
A number of organizations and individuals donated money for furniture and books to equip the new library on the third floor of the City Hall and the Santa Fe gave a gift of $500 worth of books. Miss Katherine Hackney was elected librarian to work each Saturday afternoon the library was open and her salary was to be whatever she collected in fines on overdue books.
A MILLIONAIRE HELPS ' OUT THE LIBRARY
On May 16, 1914 the first meeting of the Wellington Library Board was held with Mayor George H Hunter serving as president, M. C. Burton as vice president, Mrs. Ellen R.
Clayton as secretary and E. B. Roser as treasurer. Other members were Mrs. E. T. Hack-ney, Mrs. W. H. Maddy, H. L Buttrey, Miss Maude Price, and W H. Burks For the next twenty years Mr. Burks and Mrs. Hackney served faithfully as library board members until the public library was firmly established.
At that time Andrew Carnegie had inaugurated his program of sprinkling his name all over America in the form of grants to build library buildings that would henceforth be called by his name. On April 10, 1915, the Wellington Library Board voted to purchase the Long Bell Lumber Compa-ny property at the corner of 7th and Jefferson for $3,500.
In accordance with the provi-sions of a grant of $17,500 re-ceived from the Carnegie Foun-dation, the city hereafter agreed to spend ten per cent of that a-mount, or $1750 each year to maintain the public library in Wellington.
Today, due to rising and in- flated costs, growth in popula- tion and increased Library ser- vices, the public library spends every year for operation and maintenance almost as much as the whole building cost in 1916.
But library service is one thing a town can ill afford to do without. A number of years ago a member of the Welling- ton library staff received a let- ter from a former resident that so well expressed what a lib- rary means to a town.
“Libraries have always fas- cinated me. They house so ma- ny mysteries of the world. I re- member very vividly the first time I set foot in the Wellington Public Library. Miss Anabel Williams, my first grade teach- er at old Third Ward, had one day imparted the exciting news
to me that I could find many books to read in a wonderful building and furthermore could take them home with me for two weeks without paying a
cent.
“That afternoon instead of going home immediately, I walked the two blocks to the library, and with a rapidly beating heart, mounted the stairs on my wonderful quest. I didn’t know what to do, and the large counter looming just inside the door stopped me in my tracks. A very kind lady asked me what I wanted. I stated simply that I wanted a book. ‘Did I have a card. That bit of a question ruined my dreams. I was completely crushed. I had never heard that a card was needed. The lady must have sensed my disappointment. She promised me I could take a book home with me if I would also take a card home for my parents to sign. I was overjoyed, and after looking over several books carefully, I selected my first
book, ‘A Boy’s Life of George Washington. - A new world was open to me and I must admit that the gingerbread boy seemed pretty dull reading after that.
“For the next twelve years the Wellington Library was as much a part of my education as any class at school. By means of the library, I explored the length and breath of our country. I fought every battle in the Civil War. I wandered through every country in Europe. I found that there were oth er newspapers in the world besides the WELLINGTON DALLY NEWS. And in later years I dis-
covered the rich history of my own town and county.
“From that day to this I have been hopelessly under the spell of libraries and I always shall be. It has been my great privi- lege to visit some of the great- est libraries in our own country and Europe, but the strongest attachment I have to any is to the public library in Wellington for there I met the world for the first time.”
AS THE YEARS HAVE GONE BY
Public librarians seem to have a habit of not roving very much if those who have served our Carnegie Library are typical. Since 1916 the librarians have been Miss Jeanne Flow-er, Miss Kate Hackney, Mrs. Lucy Nichols, Miss Marie Rowland, Miss Florence Williams, Mrs. George Hepler Miss Ruth Warnock, Mrs. De-Witt Dey, Mrs. Fred McCoy, and Mrs. Leroy McGaughey.
Modern library service has changed a great deal in the seventy years since the time when the Prentis Club members set a few books on shelves in the Harry Buttrey’s shoe store.
Today the beautiful upstairs reading and reference rooms, the delightful children’s library down stairs, the microfilm reader and an abundance of films of old records and newspapers, the gorgeous paintings, the music records, projectors, copying service, and many thousands of books and periodicals of every type offer marvelous resources for people of all in- terests and all ages.
In 1901 there was no library;
in 1971 Wellington has a public library that far exceeds any- thing a person could have dreamed of seventy years ago.
Wellington Daily News
Tuesday, April 17, 2001
Wellington Public Library is getting a facelift with a new entryway.
By Tracy McCue
Wellington Daily News writer

Wellington Public Librarian Donna McNeil calls the new entryways currently under construction as a “when we could” project.
“When we could,” projects are a lot like “get around to it” projects and distant cousins to the “honey-do” projects.
In other words, the library board has been waiting several years to construct a much-needed entryway.
The new project will include two sets of double doors and tiled floor. One set of doors will be wood encased by a steel frame.
The project, being built by Gordon’s Construction, Inc. of Wichita, is expected to be finished in 30 days.
The entryway doors are being funded through donations and the leftover funds from the library construction project.
Wellington’s library underwent extensive remodeling in 1993 and 1994. The entryway was not included in the project, although the old steel frame was in need of replacement McNeil said.
“It was leaking air and was rather unsafe,” McNeil said.
While the entryway is under construction, people entering the building are urged to use the west entrance. The library will continue with its regular operating hours.
A construction worker is pictured above working on the library entryway.
ANDREW CARNEGIE
By J. Massey Rhind
P. P. CAPRONI & BROTHER, Inc.
Bust........2 feet 1 inch high Galleries and Offices:
Pedestal....3 feet 6 inches high 1914-1920 Washington St., Boston
ANDREW CARNEGIE
By J. Massey Rhind
Ivory Color Bronze Color
Bust. . . $28.00 $35.00 P. P. CAPRONI & BROTHER, Inc.
Pedestal. . 18.00 22.50 Galleries and Offices:
Packed F. O. B. Boston 1914-1920 Washington St., Boston
Chicago Tribune November 1985 ---
-----------»-----------------------
Tempo
Carnegie legacy built on a need for knowledge
By Stevenson Swanson
On a typical late afternoon at the Maywood
Public Library, children flip through the card catalogue or wander among the shelves, looking for books for their school papers. An elderly couple browse among old books that are being sold for 25 cents each. A woman who has arrived early for an evening lecture sits quietly in the last row of folding chairs in the makeshift lecture room, which is a comer of the fiction collection. In the computer room, a recent addition, a boy who has returned to resume a computer game is told by his friend, “I killed you while you were gone.”
None of this is extraordinary. That’s the point. No one is walking around the library slack-jawed in utter amazement that such an institution exists for the free use of all. Libraries are everywhere and
for everybody.
This happy state of affairs was not inevitable. At one time, readers had to pay a subscription fee for the privilege of borrowing a book. By the late 19th Century, free libraries were clearly the coming thing, but their permanent presence on the American scene was guaranteed by the old gentleman whose bemused face stares out from a portrait in the Maywood library and who is memorialized by a plaque in the entrance that says, “This library was erected through the generosity of Andrew Carnegie A.D. 1905.”
The Maywood library, a two-story, red-brick building with pillars flanking the entrance in a style sometimes called “Carnegie Classic,” is one of 1,679 libraries in this country for which Carnegie gave construction money. Between 1881 and 1917, the Pittsburgh steel tycoon gave away $56 million for the building of 2,509 libraries in the English-speaking world.
At one time, there were 16 Carnegie libraries in the Chicago suburbs [none were built in the city]. Five of the buildings are left, of which the Maywood library most resembles its original appearance. Another Carnegie building in the area, the recently remodeled library of Naperville’s North Central College, received its funding from a different sluice of the Carnegie philanthropic reservoir.
Although the Carnegie buildings that have been razed were as sturdy and foursquare as an Iowa farmer, times had passed them by. Inadequate facilities for new electronic equipment, lack of space for growing collections, and the need to make libraries accessible to the handicapped have contributed to the attrition. But in this sesquicentennial year of Carnegie’s birth—he was born in Scotland this day in 1835—no librarian, architectural historian or average bookworm can deny the enduring legacy of his generosity.
“Aside from the creation of the public school system, the creation of the Carnegie libraries has had the most important, biggest impact on public education in this country,” said Robert Gangewere, editor of Carnegie Magazine, the publication of Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Institute. “Carnegie put in place an operating system that influenced . . . the people who want to learn, the kind of people who make a difference in a country.”
“I think Carnegie made a lot of people realize that a library is somewhat like a public school system,” said Beth Mueller of the Suburban Library System, a state-funded association of libraries from O’Hare to the Indiana border. “It’s a right, not a privilege. He’s certainly colored my thinking that way.”
But why did Carnegie do it? Why was a personal fortune of $300 million burning a hole in his pocket? And why, from among all the causes and organizations he might have supported, did he choose libraries? An old saying sums up the answers: “What’s bred in the bone comes out in the flesh.”
In two articles he wrote for the North American Review in 1889, Carnegie propounded what came to
Chicago Tribune, Monday, November 25, 1985 Section 5 3
logical arrangements of bookshelves, circulation desks and leading areas; the pamphlet advocated the open plan still seen in most libraries. But towns were not required to follow the notes. Although the neoclassical facade of pillar and pediment as seen in the Maywood building was typical of many Carnegie libraries, they were built in as many styles as architects could imitate.
“The feeling you get from these buildings is that you’re somebody,” said Gangewere. “You feel you’re in a temple of learning, a serious place.”
Practically the only condition on Carnegie's grants was his requirement that towns budget an amount equal to at least 10 percent of his grant annually for maintenance, salary and book acquisition. Carnegie had given money for the building because his intention was to make libraries freely accessible to all, but the care and guidance of the library was the town’s business. The novelist William Dean Howells said Carnegie did not give feed with the gift horse.”
But that attitude offended the apostle of self-help. No institution, he said, could become a success without the hard work and tax dollars of dedicated local people. His requirement had a far-reaching effect on the way public libraries are funded in this country.
“Often enabling legislation for taxation had to be passed before the grant could be made,” said Rub. “Carnegie forced many communities and states to consider the whole notion of support for libraries.”
Carnegie and his libraries had their critics. H. L. Mencken lobbed a dead cat at the choice of books the “local wowsers” put on the shelves. It was, he said, as hard to find a good book in a Carnegie library as it was in a Boston bookstore.
But that complaint was not meant for Carnegie. Criticism of his donations came mainly from labor leaders, who took the attitude that Carnegie’s wealth was the result of the low wages he paid his workers. If the skinflint wanted to do some genuine good, they said, he would give his fortune away in the form of higher salaries.
Samuel Gompers, the founder of the American Federation of Labor, took a cynical view of Carnegie’s attempts to buy his way into heaven and the history books, but had to admit that Carnegie “might put his money to much worse acts.
“Yes, accept his library,” he advised one local unionist. “Organize the workers and secure better conditions, and then workers will have some chance and leisure in which to read books.”
Modern criticism of the libraries focuses on things Carnegie could not have anticipated. Besides the problems of space and accessibility, the old buildings’ multistory layouts necessitate additional staff to monitor all floors. Their big windows, which were useful in an era of dim indoor illumination, are ruinous in an era of cost-efficiency and energy-consciousness. And, like any old building, things are always breaking down.
But instead of tearing down old Car-negies, towns are finding it cheaper and more popular with their citizens to remodel or add onto the buildings. Geneva’s library district held a referendum in 1981 on whether to move the library and sell its attractive one-story stone building; the proposal failed. Last year, another proposed bond issue to renovate the old building passed with 70 percent of the vote
In any event Carnegie s benefaction appears to be a gift that has kept on giving As Mueller, of the Suburban Library System, said, “The development of libraries probably would have happened without Carnegie, but it would have been a lot slower.”
“Subtract 1,800 libraries from the United States at the turn of the century
and All that implies for self-education
Bridging the Urban Landscape: Andrew Carnegie: A Tribute http://alphaclp.clpgh.org/CLP/exhibit/camegie.html
Andrew Carnegie: A Tribute
""My heart is in the work."" Andrew Carnegie
Neither a rags-to-riches biographical sketch nor a perfectly scanned-in image of Mr. Carnegie could serve as as great a personal tribute to the great Founder of Libraries, the earnest Champion of Peace and the resolute Captain of Industry as presenting his own words online—available electronically and immediately to the whole world through the World Wide Web. He would be tickled pink.
Mr. Carnegie loved to promote his ideas and opinions in print. As one of America's most successful businessmen and, perhaps, the world's richest man, it can be assumed that he felt his opinions and advice were not without proven merit. In fact, his journalistic career had begun early when the young man found himself barred from free membership in Col. James Anderson's "Mechanics' and Apprentices' Library." In 1853 Carnegie took the matter to the pages of the Pittsburgh Dispatch, and, as Joseph Wall notes in his definitive biography of Andrew Carnegie, the victory the young man won through his letters to the editor left a lasting impression:
It was also his first literary success, and for Andrew nothing else that he had known in the way of recognition by others had been quite as exhilarating as this experience of seeing his
1 of 3 01/28/97 13:20:49
Wellington, KS Carnegie Library Page 2 of 4
interests of the community. Effectively trained personnel will modify or create new systems as necessary to insure that each member of the community derives the maximum benefits from the resources of the library.
* Services
Story Time for 3-5 year olds Toddler Time for 24 and 36 months of age Summer reading program for first-fifth grades AYAL youth (12-15) volunteer group Library presentations and puppet shows for all
ages
Service at area nursing homes Home service for the homebound
* Preschool Services
Spring Preschool Story Time (3, 4 & 5 yr. olds}
Pre-register in January
Fall Preschool Story Time (3, 4, & 5 yr. olds) Pre-register in August
Books & Babies (babies up to 24 months) Pre-register in January and August
Toddler Time (toddlers 25-36 months)
Pre-register in January and August
Childcare Resource Box Age-appropriate Toy Boxes (1 mo. - 36 mos.) Learning Videos and Book / Tape Sets Culture Boxes
Board Books, Alphabet Books, Early Readers
* History
The first library was opened by a lawyer named William Black in 1884-1885, a small lending library. In 1895 Mrs, Lulu Franz-Whitson and W. H. Shulte sponsored a reading room and the various societies took turns operating it. In 1898, the Prentis Study Group was organized and named for Mrs. Noble Prentis of Topeka, wife of a widely known Kansas writer and historian, who was herself a leader in the Women's Federated Club Movement. In 1899, Mrs. Prentis came to visit the club named after her and suggested that the young ladies find some worthwhile project to work on; thus was bom the idea of a library for Wellington.
On New Year's Day, 1900, a big reception was held. The gentlemen were invited to attend, the price of admission being a book instead of the customary card. About 200 books were
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/towns/Wellington/library.html 11/26/2005
KU Reading Program Awards
Preschool Story Time
Wellington, KS Carnegie Library Page 3 of 4
obtained in this manner. The library was opened in the back of a shoe store and later moved to the bank building on Seventh Street.
When the new city hall was being built, the club women were promised two rooms on the second floor, one to be used for the library. The Prentis Study Club asked the mayor to arrange for the city to take over the library. The Wellington Library Association, with a capital stock of $5,000.00 sold at $1.00 per share, was set up. The Women's Federation donated $1,200.00 for furnishings. In March 1908, it was determined to incorporate the library under state law relating to public libraries, but it was voted to maintain the name Prentis Library.
* The Carnegie Library
On April 1, 1914, at the spring election the voters approved the support of a public library by a vote of 3-1. In May 1914, the Wellington City Library board held its first meeting and voted to begin the process of erecting a library building. On April 10, 1915, it was voted to buy a site from the Long-Bell Lumber Co. at the comer of Seventh Street and Jefferson Avenue for $3,500.00. The board had begun negotiations with Andrew Carnegie, and on April 19, 1915 the Carnegie Corporation stated that it would give $17,500.00 for a library building.
The name of the architect has been lost, but the contract was awarded to J. H. Mitchell.
The building was completed in December 1915, but remained vacant for some time due to a delay in the receipt of the new furniture. Meanwhile, Miss Flower and Miss Hackney, the librarians, cataloged books. The library building was accepted from fne contractor on June 12* 1916, was dedicated June 19, 1916, and was informally opened to the public July 1, 1916. (The new furniture had still not been received.)
- Allen Gardiner, The Carnegie Legacy in Kansas
In 1986 the Library Board of Trustees and community became involved in a project to enlarge and renew the original structure; June 6,1987, the Wellington Carnegie Library was entered in the National Register Of Historic Places; 1988 ground was broken to start the exterior shell of the addition to the building. For nearly 2 years the library was in temporary housing as the interior underwent extensive renovation. The interior of the library maintains its original open floor plan and vestibule entrance. The first floor pillars retain their marble wainscoting.
* Useful Links
Webster - Dictionary Interface & Merriam-Webster Dictionary Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases
Bartlett's Quotations
USGS Atlas
Yellow Pages Sq. Foot
Reference Desk Library Spot
* Wellington References
The WPA Guide to 1930s Kansas (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1984 -http://skyways.lib.ks.us/towns/Wellington/library.html 11/26/2005
Nearly a century ago, Scottish immigrant Andrew Carnegie sold his steel company and used the money from the sale to further education, culture and peace. Carnegie money helped construct some 1,400 buildings for free public libraries throughout the United States. A self-made man, Carnegie understood that books and libraries change lives.
Nationwide, people of all ages and occupations use their local public libraries for education, economic development, personal fulfillment, and to improve quality of life. There is a world of information available from libraries.
J. H. Mitchell and Son built the Wellington Public Library in 1913-1915 for the cost of $17,500. It is located at 121 West 7th Street. A $700,000 renovation, restoration and addition to the library was completed in June 1994. Today the library contains 9,000 sq. ft., houses 50,000 books, serves the population of 8,515 locals and supports outlying areas.
Wellington, KS Carnegie Library Page 1 of 4
Wellington
Carnegie
Library
121 W. Seventh St Wellington, KS 67152
Fax (620)326-8193 or (620) 326-2011 Wellington,Kansas / wlibrary@idir.nct sutv. com
* Hours
9:30-6:00 Monday & Wednesday 9:30-8:30 Tuesday & Thursday 9:30-5:00 Friday 9:30-4:00 Saturday
* Mission
The mission of the Wellington Carnegie Library is to provide resources and services necessary to meet the evolving educational, recreational, and informational needs and
http://skyways.lib.ks.us/townsAVellington/library.html 11/26/2005
HISTORY OF THE
PRENTIS CLUB
Written By

Berthe S. Van Voorhees
HISTORY OF THE PRENTIS CLUB

Written by Berthe S. Van Voorhees

In 1932, the members of the program committee suggested that this group might be interested in having a history of the Prentis Club read on this happy occasion. Now, do not be alarmed by the size of this volume. Most of the pages are blank. In fact, too may of them are blank for this to be worth of the name “history”.

Can you imagine what a task it would be to write the history of a 37-year old club who were not historically minded enough to preserve any of their records, not even the secretary books? A few years ago, when women’s clubs began to grow history conscious, Katharine Luening was appointed by our president to collect items of interest in the club, and all members were asked to assist her in every way possible. This collection of the miscellaneous items form the nucleus of this record.

With the passing of Katharine, I was given the task of continuing the work and getting it into book form, this book is lovingly dedicated to Katharine in the memory of her loving service to the club she loved so well.

The first three years we had no year books, and Vida Price Franklin, aunt of the Hoge girls, furnished us with outlines of our lessons. We did not have

Page 1
even a list of our charter members when this book was started. During the two years of World War I we did not have program meetings, but spent our time sewing and knitting for the Red Cross, hence we had no year books for those years.

All the records we had of these five years were newspaper clippings saved by individual members. Being of an optimistic turn of mind, I thought Ida or Myrtle or Ethel could fill in the gaps of my own memory, but optimism suffered a severe jolt. One of the early members would tell me that a certain girl was a charter member. Another one, equally as truthful and intelligent, would say, “Oh no, she joined several years later” and still another would say, “I don’t recall that she was ever a member”, and so it went!!

Just among ourselves - I would not admit it to an outsider -- it had me worried. “Can it be possible” I thought, “that we Prentis girls have reached the age when our memories are failing?” Perish the thought! and then I remembered a remark made by an old lady in a novel by Bess Streeter Aldrich, and I hastened to the library and checked out a copy of “The Clutters”. I will not take the time to tell the entire story, but will briefly relate the circumstances that I had in mind.

Grandmother Clutter and her six married sons were planning a reunion. There were to spend one happy day together. For weeks Grandmother had looked forward to the event and she prayed that nothing would happen to prevent it being a happy occasion. The day arrived, and as they sat around the

Page 2
table together, the aged mother looked over her group of splendid, successful men and her heart swelled with pride. They discussed their boyhood days, arguing as they had always done. They talked of the current topics of the day and each told something of interest in his work. Then they launched upon the topic so dear to the hearts of all adults of all generations -- the shortcomings and follies of the young generation. Everything was worse than it was in their day.

And now the day of which Grandma had dreamed for so long had come and gone, and she sat in her chair by the fireside reviewing the events and conversation of the past few hours. She tried to visualize each one as he had sat before her; but everything was a blur. Instead of his face, there appeared the face of a rosy-cheeked boy. those boyish faces were much more clear than were the faces of the stalwart men who had just left her.

Vainly she tried to call them back to her, but all she could see were six little boys playing about her knees. At last, she sank back into her chair and with a smile of resignation said, “Now, I am old. I am an old woman, for the memories have become real and the realities have turned to dreams.” Well! That story made me feel better. Our memories are certainly not real. We are still living in the future. Old age must be a long way off.

If, as I read, you will mentally insert such phrases as “it is alleged” “ I am quite positive” or “it must be true” you will save me much repetition and perhaps, avoid legal entanglements. This record may be incomplete; but I assure you that it is “hysterically” correct. Any corrections or additions will be

Page 3
gladly received, but beware of your memories being too real or you may find yourself pigeon-holed with Grandma Clutter.

To Ida Hoge and Ethel Showalter is due the credit of organizing the Prentis Study Club. Although they were young girls, they realized that a woman’s cultural education should not end with graduation from school. So they talked it over with a number of other girls who thought they would be interested in a study club, and then called a meeting at the home of Ida and Blanche Hoge. At that time, the Cary Circle was the only women’s club in the city.

Other meetings were held in the Showalter home and twenty girls promised to join, but when it came to the organization meeting, two of them failed to appear. They were not very enthusiastic over the idea of becoming cultured, so there were 18 members at the first regular meeting at Maude Barrett’s. Ethel Showalter was elected President; Edna Robbins, Vice President; Ida Hoge, Secretary and May Myers, Treasurer. Other members were Myrtle Nelson, Mabel Klein, Blanche Hoge, Kate and Lottie Wheeler, Gertrude Caldwell, Maude Barrett, Bessie Walker, Bessie Hemphill, Florence Wilson, Effie Smiley, Laura Bixby, and Berthe Showalter.

The club was named for Mrs. Caroline Prentis whom we considered the typical Kansas Club Woman. The first year we quoted Rossetti, Keats, Browning, Scott and Tennyson. In fact, we must have learned almost everything about Rossetti at the first program meeting on November 7, 1898.

Page 4
The program follows:

Music: Bessie Walter
Paper: Life of Rossetti
Paper: Rossetti, his friends
Paper: Rossetti, a painter “Selections from Rossetti’s poems”

Maude Barrett read a letter from Mrs. Prentis, also her autobiography, which she said was the only one she had ever written. Refreshments were followed by adjournment. In reflecting upon this program after a lapse of years, I wonder why our meetings did not turn into slumber parties.

However, we did have our frivolous moments as some of us recall. And we had our parties every four to six weeks, but they were not allowed to interfere with our regular meetings. Now our guest nights in our year books, printed in bold print, and they take the place of our regular meeting. We always invited enough mem to “go around” even though they did not date some of our members. We would ask eligible newcomers to town or men who were not going steady with some non-member. The evening after each formal party we held a “scrap party” to which we invited only the special friends of our girls. We served scraps from the night before and everything was informal and we had more fun at the scrap party than at the first.

The fall of 1899, Mrs. Prentis paid us a visit and we held a reception for

Page 5
her in the Barrett home. We all fell in love with this gracious, silver haired woman whose life had been so rich and fruitful. She gave us some motherly advice and the burden of her message was that, if we wished to grow and thrive, we must have a goal. We must devote part of our means and our time to the betterment of our community. She suggested welfare work, such as taking magazines to the County Poor Farm; Christmas baskets to the poor and upon learning that our city had no public library, she suggested that we assume that project as our special responsibility. We tried to follow all of her suggestions but the last one made the deepest impression on us. We had no assets except our youth and enthusiasm. With those two attributes and added to them a goal worth fighting for, something is bound to happen. The spark was kindled and for eight years we almost lived and breathed for the library. When we got together, our main topic of conversation was how to raise money for our project.

(Now, I will read the article from the Wellington paper about the first books collected for the library.)

BRILLIANT NEW YEARS RECEPTION BY MOST POPULAR LADIES OF THE CITY, JANUARY 1, 1900.

“The Prentis Study Club received yesterday in the home of Miss Edna Robbins for the benefit of the public library. The reception was a success in all ways. About two hundred books were received, and as many gentlemen were royally entertained. The gentlemen were asked to bring a book, instead of the usual “calling card”. As the gentlemen came into the house, they were

Page 6
admitted by Master Quay Barnett and directed to the room which was used as a cloak room. Coming down the stairway into the reception room, a scene of rare beauty met their eyes. The house was darkened and gas lit. they were greeted at the door of the first reception room by Miss Robbins, the hostess, and Miss Ellie Smiley, President of the Club. They then passed to a table in front of a fast filling book case where they were met by two young ladies, who relieved them of their books, and requested them to write their names in the books they presented. After examining the books, each one of which was received by the young ladies with enthusiasm, the guests passed into the back parlor, where a frappe was served in front of the bay window. The window seat was piled high with cushions and invited the weary to pause and watch the gay scene. From the back parlor there were invited o the dining room where they were served a dainty repast of cold tongue buttered sandwiches, coffee and cake by the young ladies in charge, the room was decorated with carnations, the club flower and bows of turquoise blue ribbon, the club colors.

The club colors were pinned to the gentlemen’s coats by Miss Laura Bixby, who was clothed in a turquoise blue gown to match, the passed from the dining room again to the cloak room to make room for the incoming guests. Instrumental or vocal music rendered by members of the club filled the rooms at all hours of the afternoon. A few personal friends of the club were entertained in the evening. (This was one of the scrap parties).”

The 200 books received on this New Years Day were the beginning of the Wellington Library. Harry Buttrey offered us the use of several shelves in

Page 7
the back of his shoe store and the Prentis Library was born. Everyone took turns serving as librarian on Saturday afternoons and then Maude Barrett was elected librarian, a service she performed for two years.
In July 1905 the library was moved to the council chamber in the city building and continued to operate from there. All of the library fines and a porting of dues were set aside for the purchase of new books. In everything we attempted, we had the loyal support of the citizens of Wellington, the papers were willing to give us free publicity. Harry Woods was especially generous in this respect and he was continually praising the Prentis girls for their service to the town.

And so the years passed. We had watched our child from her infancy until she grew to be a healthy, normal youngster of eight years; but she had out-grown our ability to provide for her as good parents should. So we called for help. Through the Federation of Womens Clubs, we turned her over to the city. Mayor T.A. Hubbard accepted our gift in the name of Wellington, and he appointed a committee to organize a Wellington Library Association, which was called the Prentis Club Library, in honor of the Prentis Club. Our books and $250.00 which was in our library fund was turned over to the City, the library functioned until the Carnegie Library was opened in 1916. Throughout the years, several members of the Prentis Club have served on the Library Board.

On March 1, 1900, Wellington bachelor’s entertained us at the Arlington Hotel. From the MONITOR PRESS: BANQUETED THE PRENTIS GIRLS.

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“A number of young bachelors, having been recipients of various courtesies at the hands of the Prentis Study Club, turned entertainer’s themselves and reciprocated some of the attention showed them, with a banquet at the Arlington Hotel, which ranks as one of the upper-crust functions of the season. The hosts, decided to test the proficiency of the guests in the knowledge of Shakespeare, which is one of the subjects studied by the club, introduced a series of questions in riddle form that required tor they answers an appropriate quotation from the great dramatic works. Miss Effie Smiley, the Club President proved to have the greatest store of Shakespearian epigrams at ready command and was awarded the first prize. An interesting method of choosing supper partners was then introduced. Each of the gentlemen was represented by a little pasteboard figure hung on a string stretched across the room, and the ladies selected their partners by hitting his image with a small rubber ball. the ladies all managed to hit somebody, but not usually the one aimed at. The banquet was served in the large dining room and an elaborate menu was served. (Unquote)

On May 2, 1900, the County Jail was completed and the Prentis girls, by some forte of diplomacy obtained permission from the County Commissioners to open the building with a county fair, inviting all the citizens of the county to come and inspect their new building. the proceeds from the entertainment, you may readily guess, was to be used to finance the library. The evening was

enjoyed by many people from all over the county. It had been well advertised and we were rewarded by having $300.00 proceeds. Ida Hoge and Ethel Showalter were business managers and Effie Smiley and Gertrude Caldwell

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were finance committee. The rest of us served as barkers for different exhibits. We sold cake, candy popcorn, peanuts, red lemonade, ice cream and coffee. When our supply ran low and no more could be purchased, the problem was solved by the simple process of division and the sales went merrily on. Mulvaney, the street vendor, lent us his rag doll rack with rubber balls and a thriving business was carried on in one of the cells. there was a fake art exhibit in one cell and a menagerie of baby rabbits, chickens, pigeons and kittens in another. A late sleet came up before the show was over and we had to give our babies special care to keep them from chilling. We had a wheel of fortune, a fortune teller and a snake eating man -- Bosco the snake eater. One of our friends carried a hand organ on which was perched a monkey carrying a tin cup and collected pennies for the fund. Everyone had a good time, especially the Prentis girls. But after the crowd departed, consternation reigned, the money bags were missing. Everyone searched frantically, but to no avail. The next morning, the money was found in a table drawer where one of the girls had put it for safekeeping.

The fall of 1906, the members of the Wellington Lecture Club, requested the Parentis Club to take charge of the finances for that year, with the understanding that the club could keep for the library fund, everything above expenses. This was quite a responsibility, since it very frequently happened that expenses exceeded profits. We accepted, and that netted the library fund $340.48, which was the largest sum added at any one time.
Please permit me to give a few statistics pertaining to our members.

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Ethel Showalter, in addition to being the first President, was also the first bride, the first mother and first grandmother. Florence Lynch, being the first Prentis baby, was given a shower when she was about three months old.

The first bridal shower was given at the home of Mabel Piatt in honor of Mable Klein before her marriage to Charles Havens. From that time on, every bride was giving a shower. From that time on, for many years, each member gave the bride a sterling silver spoon with the donor’s name engraved in the bowl. Ida Hoge was the only member to hold continuous membership throughout the years.

The custom of giving a dinner honoring the mothers of our members continued for years and on June 11, 1924, the mothers returned the courtesy by entertaining the members at a breakfast at the home of Mrs. S.W. Spitler.

During World War 1, in addition to our Red Cross work, the club adopted a French war baby, and helped with her support. We had several touching letters from her mother expressing appreciation for our help. (Quote) “during the situation in which we have found ourselves” (Unquote).

One of our members, Mildred Mulets Metcalf, made the supreme sacrifice for her country, having died as a result of her war duty. Two of our members, Olive Spitler Hitchcock and Lottie Wheeler McKee gave their lives that another life might begin.

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We have had many fine teachers on our rolls. Others have made a success of the business world; still others have chosen home-making as their career. In 1934, Maude Renn Rothrock had the distinction of being chosen the Poet Laureate of the 5th District Federation of Clubs.

We have contributed gifts to hospital patients and veterans and sent money for the relief of the unfortunate. When St. Lukes Hospital was built, one room was furnished by the Prentis Study Club. When a member of the club passes away, a book is placed in the local library in her memory.

We read in our early records, “that the Prentis Club was organized for the literary achievement alone.” I wonder of we have attained the heights to which we aspired in our youth. I seriously doubt it, but in viewing things from the viewpoint of a mature mind, I am sure that we have accomplished greater things than if we had devoted our time to the story of literatures alone.

The club has never turned a deaf ear to any worthy cause, whether it be a urgent need in our community, the call of our country in time of war, or the cry of a hungry child across the seas. When Mrs. Prentis pleaded the cause of service she must have made a deep impression upon the hears of those 20 young girls, for in their small way, they have tried to follow the ideals which she upheld.

This history is as accurate an account as I can give with the records available. I promise that when we celebrate our 70th Anniversary in 1968, we

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have prepared this program will be perfectly content to sit in our rockers and listen to you kids recount the story of the Prentis Library. However, I will
NOT promise that there will be no corrections or additions suggested by the Old Guard.

Berthe S. Van Voorhees

Oct 30, 1924 - New
Mrs. Noble Prentis - guest of Prentis
Mrs. W. L. Fossett read a history of the Wellington Library taken from a special story written by Mrs. VanVorhees for the Wel-lington Daily News of November 16, 1934. After a visit by Mrs. Caroline Prentis, for whom the club was named, the members be came interested in civic affairs and decided upon the establishment of a library as their special project. On New Year’s Day of 1900 the club entertained with a reception at the home of Edna Robbins (Mrs. H. W. Herrick of Winfield), a charter member, and asked each guest to bring a book. Thus the library had its beginning and was called the Prentis Library until it was taken over by the city. The club held markets and bazaars to earn money
to buy books. The members took turns keeping the library open on Saturday afternoon. Other interests of the Club have been those suggested by the Federation of Women’s clubs with which it has been affiliated for many years.

Through The Years
FIFTY YEARS AGO TODAY

Perry E. Miller enjoyed a visit this morning from his brother, S. F. Miller of Tonkawa. Together they left for Kansas City this afternoon, where they will attend the combined meeting of the Kansas and Missouri Associations of opticians.

Mrs. Maude Sanders Stewart and Mrs. Sim Nof-singer of St. Louis will be in town tomorrow for a short visit.

The Prentis girls made over $50 at their market Saturday which they gave for the benefit of the public library.

W. M. Ferguson and Councilman Wyatt are in Oklahoma.

W. A. Renn left Sunday morning for Texas. On the same train was his son, Walter, who is just back from Boston.
* * *
Wellington Daily News Fri Apr 12, 1912
p. 3 The Prentis Library in the City
Building will now be open each evening from 7:30 to 9:30 and everybody (over) is invited to take advantage of this opportunity to have access to
the books and magazines there. Books can only be taken out on Saturday afternoons as usual.
Ed T. Hackney, president
Kate Luening, Secretary
Monitor-Press May 15, 1912
The Cary Circle and the Prentis Club have decided
to equip a restroom in the library room in the city
hall for the convenience of women visitors
to the city.


Wellington Daily News, Friday April 12, 1912; p. 3 - The Prentis Library in the City Building will now be open each evening from 7:30 to 9:30 and everybody is invited to take advantage of this opportunity to have access to the books and magazines there.

Books can only be taken out on Saturday afternoon as usual.
Ed T. Hackney, president Kate Luening, secretary



Wellington Daily News; Oct 30, 1924

Occupying a prominent place among the activities of the Prentis Study Club was the courtesy extended Wednesday evening to the
woman for whom the club was named at its organization twenty-six years
ago, Mrs. Noble Prentis, now of Denver, Color., for many years a resident
of Topeka and one of the noted women of the state. The hostesses and
their guests assembled at the Harvey House at seven.





House at seven thirty and were served a lovely three course
dinner.
After the dinner the women went to the home of
Mrs Sophia Knowles.
Mrs. Prentis was quite eager to learn of the various phases
of the work the club has been doing since her last visit here
many years ago = - heard
with delight how the first project she suggested to young of the Prentis Club had culminated in the fine well developed library.

Mrs. Prentis also told of her travels which have extended from coast to coast and recounted and recent especially delightful meeting with President Mr. Calvin Coolidge.
From Personal interview

Present board

Mayor Herman Zoglmann, Mr. R. G. Morris, Mrs. Willard Voils, Mrs. C. E. Russell, Mr. Howard Frazier, Mrs. J. W. Garland, Mr. R. J. Renn Mrs. Garland Mountz
Mrs. Leroy Betty - lib Mrs. Chas. Mallory - children
Mrs. Fred (Mary) Erker - assistant
1970 - adult - 41, 059 Juvenile - 23, 759
Total - 64, 818;
Average daily circulation, over 200 per day
4, 072 borrowers
738 are rural