The Annual - 1904 Sumner

Title

The Annual - 1904 Sumner

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Subject

Sumner County, Kansas--History

Sumner County, Kansas--Schools

Wellington, Kansas -- History

Wellington, Kansas--Schools

Sumner County, Kansas--Schools--Yearbooks

Kansas--History

Description

This was the 1904 Annual for the Sumner County High School. It includes ads from local merchants, photographs of school trustees, County Superintendent and photographs of the faculty and students.

Creator

Sumner County High School

The Senior Class Sumner County High School, Wellington, Kansas

The Monitor Press

Source

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Publisher

Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Date

1904

Relation

Sumner County High School Collection, Wellington Public Library, Wellington, Kansas

Format

application/pdf

Language

English

Type

Programs

Yearbook



Citation
Sumner County High School, The Senior Class Sumner County High School, Wellington, Kansas, and The Monitor Press, “The Annual - 1904 Sumner,” Wellington Digital Collections, accessed September 30, 2022, https://wellington.digitalsckls.info/item/50.
Text

The Annual

The Big Store
BOULDIN’S
The Big Store
CARRY THE BEST AND LARGEST LINE OF
Dry Goods and Shoes
IN SUMNER COUNTY
We make a Specialty of Ladies’ Tailored Suits, Skirts, Shirt Waists, Etc., Etc.
AT POPULAR PRICES
Always make Our Store Your Headquarters
Bailey..
LEADS FOR
Wellington,
Kans.
Fine photos
OVER GambRILL’S DEPART -MENT STORE
GRADUATE OPTICIAN
PERRY E. MILLER
THE
MAN
CAN FIT YOUR EYES WITH GLASSES TO YOUR SATISFACTION
GO SEE HIM AT ONCE
p
D
F. B. SNYDER
Druggist
FARM LANDS IN KANSAS RICE LANDS IN TEXAS
YOU GET WHAT YOU ASK FOR
STEWART & BARNES
WILL INSURE YOUR PROPERTY
AGAINST FIRE
AND TORNADOS
and your Growing Wheat AGAINST HAIL
WILL SELL YOUR FARM AND RENT YOUR CITY PROPERTY
SEE THEM
Wellington, Kansas
Wellington, Kansas
W.A. RENN & SON
COME AND TALK WITH us ABOUT THEM
Office opposite the Arlington Hotel Wellington, Kansas
If you trade with Gambrill you will never get robbed

fri,.-

HIGH SCHOOL
BUILDING
The
HIGH SCHOOL
ANNUAL-° 1904 °
ISSUED BY
The Senior Class Sumner County High School Wellington • Kansas
JOHN MORTON SCHWINN, Editor-in-Chief
Blanche Ward, Prudence Green, Lucy Teague, Urbin Angney Associate Editors
Prudence Green, Will Donahue, John Schwinn
Artists
Francis Monley, Business Manager
CLASS OF 1904
Harry Hunter__________________President Prudence Green_____________Vice President
Grace Whisenand_______________Secretary Urbin Angney____________________Marshal
Colors: Red and Black.
Flower: American Beauty Rose
Motto: Operae pretium est Yell: Whoac ! Boac ! Re ! Ri ! Roar !
Seniors ! Seniors ! Nineteen Four ! !
THE MONITOR PRESS
Property of
Wellington Public Library
Wellington, Kansas
R. H. BEHIMER
J. J. BOOTH
High School Trustees
R. M. HEASTY
A. A. LICHTENBERGER
Greeting.
Schoolmates, Alumni, and Friends of the Sum-
ner County High School: The deeds and exploits of the Class of 1904 are now history, and message to its Alma Mater is herein communicated.
'The purpose of these pages is not, as was Irving’s
in Salmagundi, “simply to instruct the young, reform old, correct the town, and castigate the age,” to the underlings, reform the profs, correct penmanship class, and castigate all those who do not buy this
We hope that our efforts will serve to brighten the last few hours of the fast-closing year and serve to remind you of the great and remarkable
CLASS of 1904

W. H. CARNES PRESTON WYCKOFF
High School Trustees
GEO. E. HOSICK, County Superintendent President Ex-Officio
ADA RICHARDSON.
Style, a staccato brunette; short and sweet. Deciso in manner. Her face is a measure of smiles, with two sharps beaming beneath her brows. She longs for a whole rest.
When a Senior Gits Through
Where’s a senior a-goin,’
An’ what’s he goin’ to do,
An’ how’s he goin’ to do it,
When he gits through?
Ma says she can’t tell
What we’re like to do!
An’ Pop says “Don’t git skeered Clean
Plum
Through.
S’posin’ he’d be say in’
His graduatin’ piece,
An’ the words ’ud slip away Slicker ’an any grease!
Ma says, she ist knows We ’ud start ag’in;
An’ Pop says, he “bets
’N’en you wouldn’t grin!”
S’posin’ he’d be fust
To mount the stage, alone,
An’ his galluses ’ud bust With a creaky groan!
Ma says, “Jest go on with What yer got to say;”
An’ Pop says, “Hitch ’em up— Ain’t no other way.”
S’posin’ he’d be ’plyin’
Per to teach a school, Pertenin’ he know’d all
Taught in Sumner school,— Ma says, “Yer larnin’
Shore ’ud daze’m all;”
An’ Pop says, “More’n like
They wouldn’t swaller ’t all !"
URBIN ANGNEY.
A rhapsody of brown eyes and yellow hair, with variations of freckles and sunshine.
THOS. W. BUTCHER, A.B., Principal, German.
EDMOND G. KELLEY, Mathematics.
GEORGE C. WAKEFIELD, History and Civics.
MAUDE A. PRICE, A.B., English.
BERTHA C. PRICE,
Reader in English.
CHARLES E. JOHNSON, A.M.. Sciences.
G. M. SHARRARD, A.M., Latin.
EUGENE GENTRY, Assistant in Latin.
S. L. ROMINE, Commercial Branches.
CLARA H. SCOTT,
Vocal Music.
FLORENCE C. WILSON, Elocution.
PRINCIPAL THOS. W. BUTCHER
The Board of Trustees
GEO. E. HOSICK, County Superintendent
President Ex-Officio
R. H. BEHIMER, Portland
W. H. CARNES, Wellington
A. A. LIGHTEN BERGER, Wellington
J. J. BOOTH, Conway Springs
PRESTON WYCKOFF, Corbin
R. M. HEASTY, Perth
The Faculty
WILLIAM SHULL.
A long, lank specimen of prehistoric man. His manner—somewhat lento. while his movements poca-a-poca-lento. Should be careful where he plants his feet, as they are likely to grow there. Dates back to the middle ages, but is a vertebrate.
S’posin’ he’d be chos’n
Fer the pres’dent’s-cheer,
An’ jest es the campaign was closin’
Sweep clean the hemisphere!
Ma says, she ‘‘jest ’lowed
He’d do somethin’ smart;”
An’ Pop says, ‘‘Now you’ll know
Where he got his start!”

Where’s a senior a-goin.’
An’ what’s he goin’ to do,
An’ how’s he goin’ to do it,
When he gits through?
Ma says, she can’t tell
What we’re like to do!
An’ Pop says, ‘‘Don’t git skeered
Clean
Plum
Through.
B.E.W.
G. M. SHARRARD
A junior whose name was Olmstead Got things slightly mixed in his head: His think-works ran down, Losing him in a town Where the principal product is lead.
GRACE WHISENAND.
"Come back to me, sweetheart!”
CHAS E. JOHNSON
MISS MAUDE PRICE
EDMOND G. KELLEY
GEO. C. WAKEFIELD


The HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY
Scene—Small room, with telephone.
Characters—A young, good-looking professor and some candidates for graduation.
[Enter Professor, followed by other characters at intervals of a minute or more. Door is closed.]
Professor. “Are you all—” [Door opens and two belated candidates tramp in.]
Candidates. “Are we late, Professor?”
Prof. [After the dust has settled a little.] “Not this—” [Bang-! Another pale face enters, struggling with small mountain of books.]
Pale Face, (exasperatingly) “Must I have a permit?”
Prof. “No, come in!”
Prof. “Now, Mr. C-----, will you lower those curtains, and Mr. A--, turn
off the steam, and Mr. D----, lower one of those windows from the top, and Mr.
H----, please straighten out the rug, but be sure not to shake it, as Professor
House has not cleaned it for some time.”
[Omnes faciunt.]
A fossil of the city high school. The first we heard of Rob was his voice in forte accents resounding through the halls. As the years rolled by it increased to fortissimo with an occasional fortzando. After his school career, he will teach oratory to the Indians.

ROBERT DEY.
The drum major of the class. Although rather gay and somewhat of a flirt, he is a perfect symphony of good nature and harmonic smiles.
HARRY HUNTER.

Hersagen auf Deutsch
S. L. ROMINE
MISS FLORENCE C. WILSON
EUGENE GENTRY
MRS. CLARA H. SCOTT
The High School Faculty
Prof. “Now how far had we read, Mr. A--------?”
Mr. A-----. (uncomfortably) “I-I-I didn’t quite finish the assignment,
Professor. I had a lot of other work to do.”
Prof, (severely) “Such a confession was needless, Mr. A----------; I only
wished to learn where we begin.”
Mr. A. (in I-feel-better-about-it tone) “Line 168.”
Prof. “All right, you may read if you please.”
Mr. A. “Er—” (B-z-z-z-m, b-z-z-z-t) [stops.]
Prof. “Keep right on while I answer that ’phone.” i “Don’t read so fast!”
Whispered Voices “Read slow!”
“Let up on that, can’t you?”
[Mr. A----loses his place and hunts for it while the Professor is at ’phone]
Prof, (at ’phone) “Hello-o-a-a-aw? Hello—No, this is high school. We haven’t lost any pink undershirts for you this week. Ne Plus Ultra is 139. (B-z-z-z-t)
[Professor comes back to his seat holding his ear.]
Prof. “How far did you get?”
Mr. A. “Not very far, Professor.”
Prof. “How did you read line 181?”
Mr. A. (reads) “Er *war mit eine Lust besessen.” (and translates) “He was filled with wind.”
Began her musical career by continually sandpapering her vocal chords until they produced dulcet, enchanting sounds. She is of a pianissimo nature, steadfast and adhesive in manner, and, being somewhat timid by nature, should not be left alone in the moonlight.
EULA GRANDBERRY
7 1/3 octaves high, twice repeated, with an 8va and de capo. An ideal Romeo, but no Juliet. His mustache was a song without words.
BASHFUL BATCHELDER.
[Candidates all smile audibly, Professor grins, and the horses tethered to the rack in front of building’ relax their countenances and show signs of equine mirth.]
Prop. “Did you look up that word ‘Lust’ Mr. A----?”
Mr. A. (sadly) “No, sir.”
Prof. “Well, it means desire, and that line reads ‘He was filled with a desire.’ ”
[Mr. A----, with pained countenance, watches the Professor inscribe a
geometrical figure under his name.]
Prof. “Now, Miss D------, you may con—” [Door opens and scared-looking
youth enters.]
Scared Youth. “Is Mr. Kelley in?”
Prop. “No. Did you wish to see him?”
S. Youth. “Oh, no—Oh, I mean—Oh, yes, sir.”
Prop. “All right; take a seat. Now, Miss D-------,—” [Door opens, and
Professor House hands letter to the Professor. Exit House to lower regions.]
[Professor reads letter and whispers to Mr. A---- “Another game.” EX'
eunt Professor and A---- to head of stairs, where they talk baseball and other
weighty matters. General rough house for ten minutes. Second bell rings and Professor appears at door.]
Prop. “Take the same lesson, with one hundred and twenty lines more, and everybody turn out to the ball game this afternoon.”
[Exeunt omnes.] J. S.
Equal to a whole brass band, bass drum and all. Displays much talent in playing the obligato to Mr. Dey’s fortissimo fog horn solos in the Dey-Monley aggregation.
FRANCIS MONLEY.
DAISY MARSHALL.
A wee modest floweret, as her name indicates. She is likened unto the lost chord written in a faint minor key.
Class Poem
WILL H. DONAHUE
To new green fields that before us rise, To our birthright of toil—a sovereign prize— To work with the strength that in us lies,
Till we gain the goal at last.
It matters not what station we hold May we still press onward with courage bold, As we take up the burdens oppressive and old That have humbled the ages past.
Perchance each one may not hear the call Of bugles resounding through fame’s wide hall, Nor waken the land as the shadows fall With deeds that make men free.
But we each inherit a daily life,
Where work and laughter apart from strife Down fruitful byways with gladness rife Stroll onward pleasantly.
Though ne’er may we tread the earth’s broad zones, Nor clamber where mountains rear lofty domes,
Yet may we not build us worthy homes Where the sons of industry smile ?
Though man may not reach the East or West
Nor be by travail or war oppressed
Nor of strength or riches or power possessed—
Yet his life may be worth while.
Fair meed of praise then to deeds that are grand ! But proudly applaud we the work of the band That has wrought the earth with stubborn hand To the fullness of harvest day.
Then profit we now by the examples they’ve shown That when to their gaps in the front we have gone We may profit indeed by the work they have done To speed us on our way.
Out to battle our grandsires went,
And on fields uncounted their lifeblood spent As they hurled the curse that oppression lent From the throats of a thousand guns.
Nor was it for gold nor gear they died,
Nor for king nor crown was their valor tried,
But the voice of the Freedom they’d cherished cried, At the end of the strife, “Well won.”

THE FOOTBALL TEAM
Now the nation spans the continent And reaches its arms to the Orient When the monarch gazes in wonderment
On the spire, the school, and the shop.
And the smooth-rimmed rail where the trail once ran
Praise we the work they’ve done.
And because they have toiled for noble names And striven to stand to their highest aims And snatched from the world a nation’s claims Has the whole world called, “Well won.”
Do we shrink from the tasks of our fathers’ hands?
Do we fear 10 inherit our fathers’ lands?
Is the goal too far? Is our pride unmanned That we fear to stand the test?
We know we must reap where they have sown,
And although the harvest may not be our own,
With the stubborn strength that our fathers have known Will we strive to do our best.
And we hear the voice of each bygone class with greetings come as we onward pass—
With the steady step we would keep to the last—
To the tasks that befall our lot.
And we pray that the line may be even still,
That our places with courage unawed we may fill,
That the hardest tasks we may do with a will,
And our class may falter not.
And never a task may we shun.
And we pray to our God when our work is through And we’ve done the best we'd the strength to do, Though we may not have won, may we still have been
And the river arched by the bridge’s span And the desert greened at the hand of man
Speak well of the work he’s wrought.
And because our fathers set fame at naught And tilled the land where their fathers fought And ruled the nation with careful thought
Then out to the work that our duty demands, To the college, the office, or well-tilled lands, All to the tasks that await our hands
And worthy of having won.
[true
DORA FORAKER.
Received a graduating present, a package containing sample copies of Johnson’s favorite chapel songs, “How Can I Leave You.” and “Forsaken,” a curl from Wakefield’s pompadour, a treatise on “How to Sit Down Gracefully.” by Miss Wilson, and—a boyish giggle from Sharrard.
Literary Gems
ETMORE, Earle—“His looks drew attention still as night.”
Wengler, John—“The world belongs to the energetic.”
Monley, Francis—“Confusion worse confounded.”
Schwinn, John—“Where more is meant than reaches the ear.” Shull, William—“One vast, substantial smile.”
Donahue,Will—“I awoke one morning and found myself famous.” Hunter, Harry—“Every honest miller has a golden thumb.”
Dey, Bobbie—“In all—himself.”
Carr, Harris—“Quiet as a nun, breathless with adoration.”
Angney, Urbin—“One of the few immortal names that were not born to die.” Angney, Haughey—“Give me liberty, or give me death!”
Whisenand, Grace—“So shines a good deed in a naughty world.”
Ward, Blanche—“Thou sayest an undisputed thing in such a solemn way.”
BLANCHE WARD.
The young lady with the firm marcato precipitato, and vivo manner. She speaks her mind some of the time, and sometimes all of the time.
WILL DONAHUE.
Poetical by nature. He would like to be an assistant to the universe. He is a great lover of music, his favorite song's being “Love’s Young Dream” and “Annie Laurie.”
Teague, Lucy—“A merry heart goes all the day.”
Richardson, Ada—“Two dark eyes and one black lock
Will point her out among our flock.”
Marshall, Daisy—“In maiden meditation fancy free.”
Dueker, Ottilia—“And wonder grew,
That one small head could carry all (s)he knew.”
Donahue, Edna—“Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore.”
Beitel, Annie—“The very pink of perfection.”
GRANDBERRY, Eula—“A voice that wakes the slumbering ages.”
Foraker, Dora—“Her voice was ever soft and low—an excellent thing in woman.”
Green, Prudence —“When she had passed, it seemed like the ceasing of exquisite music.”
BATCHELDER, Lynn—“There is honesty, manhood, and goodfellowship in thee.”

Woe to the vain deluded Soph Who laugheth not at the joke of Prof, For as sure and as certain as anything is He will be flunked in the very next quiz.
EARLE WETMORE.
Docile, with a semi-staccato manner. Can sing “Sweet Bunches of Daisies” and stand on his head.
OUR
BASKET-BALL
TEAM
LUCY TEAGUE.
A symphony of practicalities. The even tenor of her way unbroken by any hemi-demi-semi-quavers of frivolity.
Gold- Bricked

We are brickbats He poured us on his desk
Brought back His room was full of people
From Columbus When from his sack
In a sack Out fell the bats
By Prof. Johnson. How they did laugh!
He carried us Now let us tell
All the way How we came there
With his lot In that sack
With his lot Which Johnson carried back
But he thought From Columbus.
But he thought, At break of day
So he said Four little boys
We were Went walking.
Specimens As they passed by
For his museum. Us they did spy
It is true And seized us in a jiffy.
He never knew Then up spoke one,
How we came there. Won’t it be fun
Till from his sack, To fill up Johnson’s sack!
When he got back,
HARRIS CARR
Aspirations to be a hunter. When last seen
wandering along Slate creek “One Night in June" "Just as the sun Went Down” “In the
Shadow of the Pines” hunting “Minnies.”

ANNIE BEITEL
Makes you think of a faint, half-forgotten melody. Has a want-to-be-an-angel air, and a sweet allegretto giggle.
So each took one And on a run Started for the hotel. When they got there The office Was bare,
And in that sack Went all those Bats.
The boys
Tied up the sack,
But not like They found It.
But
When
Prof. Johnson awoke And
Thought of a joke,
He said to the clerk,
“Has anyone
Been having
Fun
With
My sack Of specimens,
Which I take back To Wellington?”
Up spoke the clerk:
“Indeed no one Has monkeyed With your Sacks.”
Then
Johnson he Took up the sacks And said, “Alacks!
How heavy They have grown;
They seem to weigh about a ton!” So
’Round the towns He carried Them,
Nor
Ever knew The difference Till he came back
OTTILIA DUEKER.
This little fraulein might be called an oratorio. A prodigy, whose ancestors were of the Tuttleli-fiemachergesellschaft von Zweitelesteschininon-ain-Papageiaufstromwartsplaudereien - Thuringenwald-spiegelflusz. Her favorite Lied is “Die Wacht am Rhein.”
EDNA DONAHUE.
A rythmic vesper bell. Chimes at twilight a berceuse and nocturne in the Forest of Arden.
And brought his You should run
Sacks For fear, or fun,
Of lead Whene’er you mention
And zinc— Columbus Bats
And Brickbats. To Johnson.
But
R. D.
The Signs of the Times
He was a tall, meditative youth, with light, listless eyes, a faltering walk, and an outward mien of hopeful dejection. He always carried a youthful library,—his long, ungainly arm having an enormous capacity, — and behind his ear was invariably poked a frayed pencil. He delved into books and made frequent visits of inquiry to members of the faculty and other storehouses of knowledge. He fasted often and burned much midnight kerosene in his tireless search for facts. Consequently his eyes grew sunken and his clothing hung loose upon its framework of bones. But no one pitied, no one applauded: it was May and he was preparing a Senior Oration. W.H.D.
JOHN SCHWINN.
Rag-time discord in 13 double flats. Would sound well if played on a barrel-organ, with baritone accompaniment of mule voices. Life-work will be waiter in a feed store, and should wear a false face when appearing in public.
PRUDENCE GREEN.
Prima virtuoso. Can reach high g without the aid of a step-ladder, and is a musical prodigy of the first water, 14 karats fine.
Proverbs
Ignorance of algebra excuseth no one.
The average senior’s hopes are raised oftener than his grades.
No junior drinketh to excess a the fountain of knowledge.
Put not the cart before the horse, or baseball practice before Virgil.
Blessed is the wind-jammer, for he talketh around the decrees of the profs
The rooter maketh more noise than the full-back who kicketh the goal.
He that findeth not wherewith to employ himself, let him advertise in the Annual.
Experience showeth that nothing is gained by whipsawing the prof into talking through the whole hour."
Believe not him who sayeth,"I work not for the grade but for the knowledge gained thereby,” but reckon him of the tribe of Ananias.
Haughey Angney.
Having his voice cultivated in the moonlight Can sing “Yu, la,” si, do and also, “I Can’t Tell Why I Love You, but I Do,’o,’o.”
An IdyI of the Trip to Columbus
JOHN WENGLER.
A wooden wind instrument. Speech accented, and written in hurry-up time. Life-work will be orator for a patent medicine, or live-stock auctioneer.
They met—
Day set
II
Ann heard—
Charge prefer
III
Dey sighed —
Ann cried.
IV
Breach healed —
Vow sealed.
After THE contest
Statistics
A wondrous list of mysteries is connected with the class of 1904. A fair look into their faces will astonish you, but just close your eyes, if you so desire, and hear some of the particulars that the census man has found out for us. Now if any one should have differences with the census man, or ‘‘feel touched or grieved,” tell the census man and he will give him satisfaction in a game of tiddledy-winks. This paper is a true copy of his personal accounts relating to the different members of the class.
He has placed our number at twenty-three. No one can truthfully deny this. The class therefore ranks equal in number to the class of 1902 and has only one senior aggregation which surpasses it: the class of 1901.
Great and small, thin and tall,
We’re most luminous of them all
When o’er this world we go in glee,
This odd bright number ‘‘Twenty-three.”
Whoac! Boac! Re! Ri! Roar!
Seniors! Seniors! Nineteen-four!
If they should stand themselves one on top of the other, the last one that went up might float the red and black banner in the air one hundred and thirty feet. Our tallest one reaches the top of almost any common-sized door.
This means a height of six feet two,
Standing erect without a shoe.
And, if every member in the class Should lie outstretched upon the grass,
there might be made a good goose fence extending two hundred feet in length, and having a gate five feet, two and a half inches wide, which would be the shortest length obtainable.
When the entire number is placed on the scales they weigh just a ton and a half, which gives an average of over twenty-three pounds in weight for every foot in height. As to the color of their eyes, there are ten having brown eyes, six with blue, four that have gray, and one who says she has eyes like a cat. Count the number of teeth in each one of the mouths and you will find the sum of seven hundred and thirty-six grinders and gnawers. Should a large pumpkin pie be placed before them, two hundred and thirty finger marks might be made in it all at the same time.
Thirteen of the class have parents who are engaged in agricultural pursuits.
From over the hills and through the woods Our county high school gets her goods,
For see how large they make the score In this gay class of nineteen-four.
Heap Big Junior Athlete
1905
Class Color: Flesh color.
C lass Motto: “Ich bin es," or “I am It.” Class Breakfast Food: Malted milk. Class Flower: Century plant.

The parents of the remainder are of various occupations. There are two lawyers, two millers, one minister, one banker, one painter, one carpenter, one overseer of the city street sprinkling, and one superintendent of the Santa Fe railroad. These are men of almost all trades or professions necessary for the country’s welfare and enlightenment.
By tracing their descent, six are found to be of American descent; the ancestors of seven are from the Vaterland, nine from Merrie England, one from Canada, one from the land of “Bonnie Doon,” and one from the Emerald Isle, There is still one more whose great-great-grandfather was either a Chinaman, Mongolian, or a Hottentot: but there is this certainty, that he was a descendant of Adam. Thirteen of the graduates were raised among rustic environ-ments, nine in the city, and one in the “Alfalfa District.”
Kansas has the majority of those who call her their native state, although Missouri has three representatives, Arkansas, Iowa, Illinois, and New Hampshire one, and there is yet another who claims her raising took place in
hibernation.
The world will be bettered or injured by eleven more applicants for country schools next year. Eight intend to continue their school work, and the others are undecided. But we all hope to attend the World’s Fair in the meantime.
There are a dozen who have required but four years to finish their high school work. Four have spent five years, one five years and a half, and another six years. The remaining ones have taken just time enough to get through or
thereabouts.”

Most of the class prefer out-door exercises for their enjoyment rather than reading of books; but there is one whose chief amusement is being amused. Now in the following questions and answers regarding the more personal accounts by the census man, please let the guilty person look wise and on a picture-like expression.
What is your exact weight? “Dead weight on my father.”—Edna Donahue. Are you self-supporting? “Yes: I wear number nines.”—Dey. What are your ages, please? “Over sixteen.”—Blanche Ward and PruDENCE
Green.
What noted event in your life? “When but six years old I touched the but-

ART EXHIBIT
FROM
THE MUSEUM
YE Sophs
Class Colors: Blood red, black and blue.
Class Motto: “Life is checkered light and shade” Class Breakfast Food: Vigor.
Class Flower: Forget-me-not.
ton that blasted the first rocks of the tunnel on the M. K. & T. railroad in Missouri.”— EULA GRANDBERRY.
From what school did you enter the county high school? “Buzzards’ roost.” — Will Donahue.
Who are your favorite poets? “Burns and Donahue.”—Prudence Green. Favorite classic? “Mary had a little lamb.”—Schwinn.
What do you expect to do next year? “People.”—Francis Monley.
U. A.
A Toast
Here’s to the High School, trustee, and professor—
Here’s to our friends of the school year just passed— Here’s to the senior maid—kind fortune bless her—
Here’s to the youth who was brave to the last!
Here’s to our office-talks, troubles, and sorrows—
Here’s to our meetings and heated debates —
Here’s to the midnights we’ve “crammed” for the morrows-Here’s to the future that for us awaits!
Here’s to the freshman and here’s to the sophomore — Here’s to the “Annex crowd,” always alive—
Here’s to the Special and Teachers’ review course—
Here’s to our successors of nineteen and live!
W.H.D.
The Freshman
Class Colors: Pumpkin yellow and pea green.
Class Motto: “Ye are green wood: See ye warp not.”
Class Breakfast Food: Mother’s Oats.
Class Flower: Milkweed.
Positively his first appearance.
0ne Dey Menu

FIRST COURSE
Fried Sucker Sharrard Wheat
Hot Tongue Sauce
SECOND COURSE
Mashed Hearts Sopht Croquettes Freshmen Roast
Smothered Brains Hard Rolls
THIRD COURSE Be(i)tels on Half Shull
’Lasses Fritters Turnovers
FOURTH COURSE
Strained Relations Jumbles
Grandberry Sauce with Angney Crackers
FIFTH COURSE
Pound Cake Lady Fingers Faculty Ice
Can’t-elope with Seniors
SIXTH COURSE
Spirits of High School

Table Decorations: P. Green Favors: Daisy(s) and Batchelder Buttons
Kalendar
1903.
Sept. 14. Students arrive from alfalfa regions and locate laundry for celluloid collars.
Sept. 15. School opens. Freshmen inquire for freshman room.
Sept. 16. Customary lecture to Seniors by Prof. Butcher. Sept. 18. Official plums of the Senior class distributed. Result, some sour grapes.
Oct. 16. Seniors decide on pins.
Oct. 23. Jesse Wentworth falls up-stairs.
Nov. 6. Mr. Wakefield separates “gentlemen of bass” from the chorus.
Nov. 9. X illuminated in the algebra class.
Nov. 26. Everybody goes home for turkey.
Dec. 12. Seniors expect class-pins.
Dec. 21. Mr. Johnson christens Hollow-heads.
Dec. 24 to Jan. 2. Christmas vacation.
1904.
Jan. 2. The same old grind.
Jan. 20. Seniors anxious about class-pins.
Jan. 20-22. Half-term exterminations. Results, survival of the fittest.
Jan. 25. New green goods from the grades.
Jan. 25. New term begins (for profs).
Jan. 30. New term begins (for students).
Feb. 2. Haughey Angney offers to go in search of class-pins.
Feb. 10. Mumps.
Feb. 15. More mumps.
Feb. 28. Measles.
March 16. Prof. Johnson stuffs his pupils with a story.
April 1. Mr. Wetmore appointed as telephone boy.
April 3. Mr. Butcher addresses the school on Harvard.
April 5. Senior “spread” at Whisenand's.
April 11. More measles.
April 11. Harry Hunter carried fainting from the ’phone as
he gasps, “The pins---------!”
April 12. Country teachers arrive.
April 20. “Swing, Cradle, Swing,” sung by request of Freshmen.
April 21. Mumps and measles.
April 22. Prof. House takes an automobile ride.
April 28. More mumps and measles.
April 29. More mumps and more measles.
April 30. Willis wins the contest.
May 1. Mr. Johnson brings home his fine collection of Columbus brickbats.
4. Mr. Kelley and Mr. Batchelder become smooth-faced
boys.
5. Mr. Sharrard springs a new suit.
7. Straw hat appears at high school.
My.
May 23-25. Last ditch crossed.
May 24. Class day extraordinary.
May 25. Commencement exercises extra-extraordinary.
(We go to press wishing you prosperity enough to buy an Annual. )
Primer

LESSON I.
See the an-i-mal!
Yes, it is a bat.
Is it a-live?
No, it is a stuffed bat.
Where did it come from?
It dropped from the ceil-ing.
A rat chewed the string.
The bat’s hat-pin eye jarred out. The bad rat!
Senior Briefs
Existed—A Dey.
Environment—Urbin.
Extent—Foraker.
Filled—A Carr.
Avocation—Hunter.
Aspirations—An Earl, or at least a Marshall.
LESSON II.
Oh, see the white wea-sel!
Wea-sels are scarce an-i-mals.
The mu-se-um man worked a week.
He sewed a hun-dred pie-ces of hide to-geth-er; be-cause you know, lit-tle chil-dren, the wea-sel had been dead too long.
He an-nexed one hind leg of a fer-ret.
He sewed an-oth-er leg of a mink.
Pret-ty wea-sel!

SING a song in chorus
Here before you ail,
Three and twenty seniors
Just about to fall.
When the program’s started
We wish you all would run,
For settin’ on the stage here Isn’t any fun.
JUNIOR NOTES
Chalk Dust
I. Where did Professor Kelley’s mustache go?
(a) Give 20 causes and 40 results.
(b) Give 10 leaders on each side, and decisive battles.
II. Name 7 causes of the death of Tyler.
III. Tell all you can of the Roundheads, also apply to present day:
10 causes and 15 results.
IV. How does the Reign of Terror compare with examination
week? Number of lives lost.
V. What color of necktie did Columbus wear when he discovered America?
VI. Why is a rat?
Nature Study
Scene—A nest in a large tree on Slate creek. Mother bird is talking- to her young. (Great commotion among the other birds and cries of: “There comes Professor Johnson! Flee!”)
Mother Bird. “Hide in the nest, dearies. If Professor Johnson gets you he will stuff you and put you in a glass case.”
(Enter Professor Johnson, soliloquizing ) “Look at those young mocking birds. I’ll get them all and make a fine group out of them. I hope that bird class will stay away till I get them. They always show up at the wrong time.” [Starts climbing. Mother bird begins to sing.]
Enter bird class, headed by Miss Price, coming to see what kind of bird is.)
Professor Johnson (extricating himself from a thorn) takes a sneak, muttering to himself: “Foiled again!” H.H.
THEY
PLAY
BALL
Yells
Sis-s-s ! Bo-o-m ! ! ! Who-e-e-e ! Sumner ! ! !
Nigger ! Nigger ! Hoe Potater ! Half-Past Alligator ! !
Ram ! Bam ! Bully Nigger !
Chick-a-waw-dah !
Sumner County High School.
Rah ! Rah ! ! Rah! ! !
Razzle! Dazzle! Hobble! Gobble!
Zip! ! Boom! ! Ah-h!
Sumner County High School, Rah! Rah! ! Rah! ! !
Boom-a-lacca! Boom-a-lacca!
Bow! Wow! Wow!
Chick-a-lacca! Chick-a-lacca!
Chow! Chow! Chow! Boom-a-lacca! Chick-a-lacca! Who are we?
Sumner County High School ! Don’t you see?
ELLIOTT WILLIS represented the High School and the Cadmus society in the oratorical contest of the high schools of the state. Mr. Willis is a sophomore and a member of the Y. M.C.A. That he is an orator of no mean ability is shown by the fact that he has won first place in both the local and state contests.
WANTS.
Advertisements under this heading 12 1/2 C per line: minimum charge of 30c. Cash must accompany copy to insure insertion.
FRESHMEN ATTENTION ! We are mak-ing special prices on Rubber Rings and Infants’ Supplies of all kinds. Make our store your headquarters when in the city.
Students’ Supply House.
Dedicated to________________________

To the diamond he goes for base ball,
To the chorus he comes to bawl bass; Beside Juliet he seems rather small.
For he has to smile up to her face.
First Base: “Our new catcher is good on fouls.” Short-Stop: “Yes, his father is in the poultry business.”
Finis
Our most successful year has just passed and it is with a feeling of pride that we look back upon it.
The enrollment broke all previous records. Two new profs were added to faculty row, and among our students have been several from other states. Our contest in oratory was a heart-warming and ear-rending one, and pur orator, although the prize was withheld on account of technicalities, won first place at the state contest. Our athletes have been successful in all lines of sport.
Although our “Head” has been absent during almost the entire year, the new man in the office has made things hum and has shown his ability to run a school that is a winner.
And now, as members of the graduating class, we deem it fitting that we offer a few suggestions for the years that are to follow:
The school needs a gymnasium, especially for the girls.
It needs a larger assembly room, one in which the solid bodies are not packed so tightly as to hinder the circulation of pure ozone through the interstices during chapel.
We need a museum in which to place our handsome exhibit.
We need a commodious library and reading-room, and more recitation rooms.
Then the carpet in the office ought to be taken up and have the dust of ages beaten from among its folds.
Come and see for yourselves our other urgent and crying needs.
Next year Mr. Butcher will be back, and among other optional courses, will offer one in economics. We shall have a larger staff of instructors and we hereby, with our parting breath, bespeak an unprecedented attendance.
Here’s tears for our parting, honor for your achievements, apologies for the untruths of our contributors, and—the hat for a contribution to the Annual.
Why of Course, if you want
Good Reliable Goods
YOU SHOULD TRADE WITH
Jacob Engle,

Hunter Milling Co
Wellington - Kansas

Wellington
Roller Mills

SAYLOR & MEYER
. . . FOR...
Clothing, Gents’ Furnishings
and Shoes
Property of
Wellington Public Library
Wellington, Kansas

SUMMER EXCURSIONS VIA THE |
COLORADO, June to September : WORLD'S FAIR, St, Louis, Season $21.85
60-Day, $18.20; 15-Day, 16.40 Santa Fe
Home-Seekers' every 2d and 3d Tuesday.
W. F. TYLER, Agent, Wellington, Kansas
GELINO
hardware Co.
CO.
Stoves, Tinware, Etc.
GARLAND STOVES, QUICK MEAL, STEEL RANGES AND QUICK MEAL GASOLINE STOVES
Tinwork of all kinds done on short notice.
Wellington, Kansas
YOU SHOULD PATRONIZE . . .
Lichtenberger’s
Barber
and Bath Rooms
FOR A SATISFACTORY SHAVE OR BATH
SHORT ORDER MEALS
SERVED AT
Plummer's
Only first-class Short Order House in the city. Everything served in season.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT !
BIG CASH CLEARING SALE
LADIES' $3.50 SHOES for $2.50 LADIES' 2.50 OXFORDS, 1.75 MEN'S 4.00 SHOES, 2.98

Big Shoe Store DEANS Big Shoe Store

Original Format

Small bound booklet/yearbook, 6 3/4" wide X 9 3/4" Tall, in printed cover